Hot answers tagged

42

You could install a circular ceiling medallion over the hole and run the light fixture through the middle of it. This would avoid having to match the paint of the surrounding ceiling. Or here's an even simpler, 10", white trim piece.


23

The white marks are joint compound (aka "drywall mud") - kind of like plaster. The stripes are where separate sheets of drywall are joined with tape and mud and the little splotches are where screw holes have been covered over with mud. Those actually are good places to install your storage rack because they indicate the locations of the lumber framing that ...


20

There is no problem with installing junction boxes above a suspended ceiling, as long as the box is less than 100 in.³ and securely fastened. National Electrical Code has this to say... National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 3 Wiring Methods and Materials Article 314 Outlet, Device, Pull, and Junction Boxes; Conduit Bodies; Fittings; and Handhole Enclosures ...


20

Usually at least one of the "claws" is spring-loaded, and can be pulled straight out to release the glass.


20

You've hit on three viable options. I'll make some notes on each so you can decide. Run a cleat across the gap Requires perhaps the most damage to the finished ceiling, but simple and fairly easy A 2x6 laid flat against the ceiling will carry the weight just fine (avoid boards with large knots) Four 3-1/2" by 3/8" lag screws, properly piloted into the ...


20

It's impossible to say with any confidence without knowing the details of your house's construction. If there is a regular room above (not an attic) the ceiling you want to hang the rings from, normally those ceiling joists above are also the floor joists of the room above. If it was constructed to modern guidelines those are going to be pretty strong - if ...


19

I vote for the solution of providing blocking in the attic but will suggest a technique which is very much easier to install than some of the other answers here. A side on looking picture will get the idea across quickly. First trip to the attic to access the situation should include making measurements for spacing between the ceiling joists and the ...


19

Spackle might work, however it is specially designed for repairing holes and cracks and is more expensive than the product that is normally used for doing a skim coat: regular joint compound or topping compound. You should do a bit of research and plan to practice with wide trowels/mud knives if you intend to do this yourself. Hanging the drywall is not the ...


18

Terminology-wise those look like bolts. Removing-wise, look in the attic above the room for bolt-heads, first. If they are not though the joist, they are probably a "lag/machine combination", and you put two nuts on, tightened against each other, then use a wrench on the upper one to back them out. Putting them in is the same, but you put the wrench on the ...


16

Like any other repair to sheetrock/plasterboard/drywall. Turn power off (the breaker, not the switch) to the fixture and drop the trim out of your way. Either cut out a larger area and make a large patch, or add some wood strips behind and fit a small patch, then fill the joints (force joint compound into them with a small drywall knife), tape, and mud (...


16

How tall are your ceilings? You're going to be putting huge stresses on the ceiling when you're swinging, even doing simple giants, to say nothing of any sort of move that has a "landing" - all that "jerk" you feel in your shoulders is being transmitted right up to the framing. As a former gymnastics dad, I've watched the rings rig as it ...


14

It may not be termites but it looks likes some kind of insect infestation. I would contact either the building owner or a local pest exterminator. What ever the tunnels are made of is likely building material. I would recommend doing this quickly before there is structural damage to the building.


13

I have the same one...the definitive answer is as Grant says. One of the clips pulls out enough to remove glass! No screws or screwdrivers needed.


12

Nail holes in a joist wouldn't concern me unless it affected a significant proportion of the joist. You can safely drill a hole 1/3 of the width of the joist in the middle for running wiring. Cracking or sagging that is allowing the home to go out of level/plumb is a concern. It's best to get a structural engineer to evaluate this problem. The standard ...


12

The cable with the white wire that's connected to the two black wires is a switch loop: Normally wires with white insulation are used only for neutrals, but code makes an exception to allow for use of the white wire in a cable used as a switch loop as a hot rather than a neutral. If you'll look closely in the drawing, the whites used as hots are wrapped ...


11

Utility Knife Position a 2'- 4' level (or other straight edge) along the line you'd like to cut. With the straight edge in place, gently draw the utility knife along the line. You don't have to press too hard, just enough to cut through the paper on the face of the drywall. Draw the utility knife repeatedly through the groove you scored in the previous step....


11

The easiest option would be to run a new cable directly from the switch, up to the ceiling fixture. You'll want to either install a larger box and a new switch, or a double switch, so the light can be controlled independently. If you're working in a home constructed of solid wood framing, you should be able to run the new cable fairly easily. Since you didn'...


10

The overkill direction (which is actually appropriate for some circumstances, such as a ceiling that needs to hold up a lot of insulation, as for an attic above) is to run 1x3 strapping opposite to the joists. An advantage in the application I mention is that this strapping can be on 12 inch spacing, so the drywall can be attached with a screw every foot, ...


10

I would assume it's because you have plaster ceilings that use metal lath.


10

Yes, you should install covers on the boxes. You should be able to pick up covers at the local hardware or big box, fairly cheap. Just make sure you measure all the boxes, and note their shape, before heading to the store. If the mounting screws are not in the boxes, you'll also have to pick up some of those. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 3 Wiring ...


10

The type of bolt that you show and the size comparison that you demonstrate in the second photo would indicate that these were installed for ceiling hooks of the type pictured below: Indeed if the ones in your ceiling seem solidly placed then the hook was installed using the ceiling joist type of bolt/screw as shown in the right part of the picture. The ...


9

Drywall is easy to patch without having to cut it back to expose a joist. Here's how: Cut a piece of thin wood to a length that is a couple inches longer than your hole. A paint paddle or the thick side of a wooden shim works well for this, but any scrap piece of wood will do. Drill a screw partially into the middle of your scrap piece of wood. ...


9

I find that it's best to attach 1x3 furring strips across the joists. It's worth the extra cost. The 1x3 will give you 1.25 inches of screwing space, so you don't have to be quite as accurate with your cuts. Glue is not needed, but will reduce screw pops by making the assembly more 'solid'. I always use adhesive when I can (when there is no vapor barrier ...


9

Here's my take on drywall vs skim vs full update. Skimcoat Skim coating over the plaster that is already cracking would not be a good idea. Even if you use a harder more durable mud or plaster, it will still most likely crack because of the age of your house, and the fact that your walls are already cracking (and will probably continue to do so). The ...


9

Getting rid of this texture will be a lot of work. I would recommend that you leave it there unless you absolutely must get rid of it. The ceiling appears to be painted, which means that the texture cannot simply be sanded off. I actually have a similar texture applied to some of the walls in my home. The only way to eliminate it besides either tearing down ...


9

With option 2 you have twice as much seam length running down the center of ceiling joists. This can be a real pain to keep everything aligned, especially when you have roof braces, overhead door brackets, and other structures holding the truss members rigidly in place. Also, some brands of drywall aren't designed to resist sag parallel to the mounting ...


9

You don't have joists or rafters. You have engineered roof trusses. The bottom chords are 2x4 because that's all that's required for your scenario. They don't span the ceiling themselves. They're part of a rigid structure that's supported by both the top chords and the diagonal truss members. This is typical and has been standard practice since the 1970s ...


9

This is what an unpainted surface looks like. Those white marks are joint/drywall compound and under them are screws holding the drywall to the joists. The long white lines are the same thing except on a junction between two sheets of drywall. So there are screws and a seam under them. You can install a rack along the white marks but not directly in the ...


9

Wow, the picture you happened to take illustrates perfectly why those metal clips are installed. The metal clips are used to keep the truss independent from the non-bearing wall. That is to say, the roof trusses are designed so the wall does NOT put pressure on the bottom chord of the trusses, but help maintain the wall in its proper position. The way it’s ...


8

First measure this distance on the light base: Then check this distance on the existing bracket. (These should be the threaded holes in the bracket). If those two dimensions match then use the screws B to mount the base to the existing bracket into the threaded holes. You should be able to start the screws into the bracket and then slide the light base ...


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