56

DANGER!!! This sounds like a ground fault. They are particularly dangerous if you get wet, which is why Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters have been required for many years in kitchens and bathrooms, among other places. If you have shoes on, you are insulated from the floor. Without shoes, a little bit of electricity makes its way from the fan through you to ...


17

Your pull chain switch is probably starting to fail. The switch and chain wouldn't be grounded because it in a plastic housing so if the switch contacts are leaking over to the chain, that's where your shock is probably coming from.


11

A lot of this comes down to aesthetics and practicality, so you will probably get lots of right answers. Here's my take: I would run your short piece of 2x4 level at the peak alongside 2 of the rafters. You will then be able to use a saddle fan box to mount your fan. This box slides over the 2x4, and is only fastened using a set screw. You then use wood ...


10

Yes, you can do that and it will swap the power to the light and fan. Just remember to turn off the power at the breaker before doing any work.


8

Is this ceiling fan going to fall? There is nothing in the photo that tells me a fall is about to happen, but the installation looks poor, and I think you need to get under that cover. Will it cut your head off? No, if the physical support let’s go, it will dangle by it’s wiring like a wounded buzzard, but probably give you time to get clear. A bonk with a ...


7

Okay, stop. The 10-32 screw requirement is for the lower screws which attach the fan to the box, not the upper screws which attach the box to the wood. You can see the holes that the 10-32 screws go into, in those tiny squares to left and right of your photo. It's entirely possible those squares do something clever, like capture a nut. But they are ...


7

Return that bracket and get a box only (no metal bar) rated for a fan. Run a length of 2x4 or 2x6 horizontally across from one rafter to the opposite one. Mount the box on the underside of this 2x. It will have no wobble and you can center it. You don't need bolts to attach this horizontal member; 2 to 4 screws on each end would do. You might need an ...


6

That should be fine. The only question is how many neutral (white) wires are connected and if two, are they connected to separate wires to the fan. If there are two and they connect separately, you should swap them too. As @Jack noted, make sure to turn off the breaker before working; don’t depend on the switches being off.


6

Most of those fans have brackets attached to the sides of the housing that extend and are nailed into the studs. Since it's the motor making the noise, try unplugging it from the housing and removing those silver screws. You should be able to remove the motor and fan impeller. Now try to clean it up and dab a few drops of oil on the motor bearings.Re install ...


5

(A partial answer) Why are there 3 cables in the box? One cable brings power from "upstream", either directly from the circuit breaker to the fan, or from the breaker via another fixture. One cable leads from the fan to the switch. This should be the cable that you connected to the fan. This is what enables the switch on the wall to operate the ...


5

I almost certain that the glass should rotate off, the little indent in the metal will be for a corresponding groove in the glass cover. Some times the friction on these make them feel as thought they will not move. If you are careful and wrap the glass in a damp towel, or some other grippy material, and try turning with a little more force it should come ...


5

Anytime the body (chain in this case) in any appliance gives the user any sense of electrical current, mild or otherwise is absolute proof of 2 truths: 1] The body of the appliance is not grounded. It may have been or never was.. but it IS NOT at this time. (remember that green wire you didn't think you needed?) 2] There IS an electrical fault of some kind ...


5

The conventional way this is dealt with is to replace the whole fan unit housing with all innards with a new one. With luck you can find a replacement with the same or similar housing size. If, as your question suggests, you intend to just try swapping out the motor and fan blade subassembly then you need to carefully check that the new unit is in any way ...


4

No, don't do this. The problem with your proposed circuit is that as soon as the two neutral paths are connected at the fan, you no longer control which neutral carries how much return current. The two cables connected at the fan are almost sure to carry unbalanced current. You can do what you want safely, and prepare for future installation of powered ...


4

There is a simple rule of thumb that keeps you honest, about cabling: No loops. What you just drew there is a loop. You can't have loops. Think about a tree - trees have many places where they branch or split. But you never see two branches re-merge so they are connected and interchange life fluids. That doesn't happen. So all wiring must be a tree - ...


4

This is not aluminum, but tinned copper instead There is no reason to use aluminum at such small wiring sizes; what you see instead on such finer-stranded fixture wires is tinned copper. This is done to allow it to be easily used in applications where it needs to be soldered (say to a circuit board in a dimmer or fan receiver), and has none of the ...


4

The white Molex™-connector is part of the fan housing and is designed to be connected to the fan provided with it. Likewise, the 2-blade NEMA-style connector is also part of the fan housing and is designed to be connected to the fan provided with this housing. You would generally replace the entire fan, housing and all, not just the blower motor. If you do ...


4

I would take Ecnerwal's suggestion a bit further. Build some simple blocks with flanges using 2x3 (so they fit through the hole) and plywood (whatever you have on hand). Drop them in place with beads of construction adhesive or wood glue on the backs. Come back a day later and carry on. SIDE (ELEVATION) VIEW ____ ______________________ | | ...


3

You explained it perfectly and yes, you can keep it that way or switch the black wire from the fixture to the red wire and cap the black. You would want the switch that's the easiest to find, in the dark, to control the light.


3

A picture of your box, instead of generic picture from the internet somewhere, will get you more specific help, but... Without going into the attic for access from above or cutting open some drywall for access from below you're really stuck with one option: Cutting and/or breaking up the box to get it out of the ceiling. If you cut, use extreme care: Turn ...


3

How much force does an 3 pound hammer hit with? Just 3 pounds, right? Just place the hammer atop the nail and the nail drives in from the fearful force of 3 pounds? No, that's not how hammers work, hammers involve a dynamic force that is much larger. That's not how fans work either. Fans are mostly dynamic force because of their spinning and vibration. It ...


3

With a lot of new ceiling fans, the "switch" in the box in the wall is nothing more than a wireless transmitter and the fan is permanently wired at the ceiling through the wireless receiver. So if that receiver unit fails shorted, the fan cannot be turned off. If you are not comfortable with electrical work, this is something that will require the ...


3

You have suggested you will replace your fan. I understand that you can buy a new fan for under $50, but some cost over $300. While its a bit more work, I'm a fan of finding the problem before throwing money/parts at a solution. The problem could lie in the pull-chain switch, or in the wiring in the gang box above the ceiling fan. A full replacement may ...


3

This is not even close to the box from hell. Why are there 4 bare copper , your home was wired with grounded NMB type cables each cable has a ground so there are 4 how can I tell? The number of and colors of black white & red wires. All the grounding conductors or bare copper should be connected together. Why is there only 1 red wire. This cable is quite ...


3

How much heat is generated by a ceiling fan's remote control receiver? It depends on what your remote does. Some remotes have a very low power dissipation but others with both speed and light dimming can get quite hot. I would never use bubble wrap on an electronic circuit. I might make a plastic umbrella above it. If water gets in the fan or lighting ...


2

This is a Hampton Bay (Home Depot) model with an 'Up' light. With a step ladder and an appropriate length Phillips screwdriver it is really simple. There is a small cover over each bulb and you have to remove 2 screws to get it off and get at the bulb. There are 4 C7 type bulbs that are 15 watts with 100 Lumens. Home Depot sells replacements as "Ceiling Fan"...


2

I bought 2 Hunter Exeter model fans and was running into the problem of the lights cutting in and out after about 10-15 minutes of steady light output. Both fans were having the same problem. The fans are controlled by radio frequency remote controls - which the instructions say are "paired" with the fan when they arrive. BUT, you can re-pair ...


2

I had to install a light fixture over a pool table in a situation very similar to this. The fixture had to be centered over the table and between joists with 26" space. I cut a 2x4 23" long and two pieces about 5" long. I centered the two pieces on each end forming a "T" and screwed them in with some 3" deck screws. I pre drilled two holes at each end of ...


2

I'm guessing you will want the fan to operate by the pull chain and the light to operate by the switch. For clarity, those are black wires and white wires out of the ceiling. The black wire from the fan will get wire nutted to the two black wires from the ceiling. The white wire from the fan will get wire nutted to the two white wires from the ceiling and ...


2

Yes, that's a good idea. It's essentially the same box just stronger. It also needs to be installed with the correct hardware. Install a fan box in every room where you would typically put in a ceiling fan, the cost to do it now is minimal compared to the cost of doing it later.


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