56

DANGER!!! This sounds like a ground fault. They are particularly dangerous if you get wet, which is why Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters have been required for many years in kitchens and bathrooms, among other places. If you have shoes on, you are insulated from the floor. Without shoes, a little bit of electricity makes its way from the fan through you to ...


17

Your pull chain switch is probably starting to fail. The switch and chain wouldn't be grounded because it in a plastic housing so if the switch contacts are leaking over to the chain, that's where your shock is probably coming from.


15

The 3 wires are normally hot, neutral, and ground. It sounds like your home doesn't have a ground wire. From Wikipedia: Equipment earthing conductors provide an electrical connection between non-current-carrying metallic parts of equipment and the earth. The reason for doing this according to the U.S. National Electrical Code (NEC), is to limit the ...


13

Check the fine print To find out if the dimmer can work with the fan, you'll have to inspect the dimmer. For this, you'll have to remove the cover plate and possibly pull the switch out of the box (in which case, make sure you shut off the power at the breaker). If you see the text "For Incandescent Only"; or something similar, you should not use ...


13

The red wire is the ungrounded (hot) conductor from one switch, while the black wire is the ungrounded (hot) conductor from the other switch. In the original installation one switch would energize the red wire causing the fan to come on, while the other would energize the black turning on the light. With the new fixture, both the fan and light ...


12

Electrical boxes serve several functions. They protect wiring where insulation has been removed. They prevent inadvertent contact with exposed components. They contain sparks when the worst occurs. And they provide standard mounting points for fixtures. I'd be inclined to "code things up" with a wraparound box like so: Nonmetallic ceiling joist box for ...


11

One reason bulbs can burn out quickly is if the voltage applied to them is higher than the expected voltage (120V in The USA). Wiring problems and bad transformers can cause the voltage to be out of spec. Another reason is if there is a loose connection somewhere, and the light flickers (causing unnecessary heating/cooling cycles). A third reason is if the ...


11

The type of wire you use depends on what kind of circuit you are attaching to. Go to your electrical box, find the circuit for the current light switch, and read what it is rated for (probably 15 or 20 amps). If it is 15 then you use 14-3 wire. If it is 20 then you need 12-3 wire. The "3" will give you an extra red wire and that will be used to separate ...


11

There's no problem at all with what you've done. In fact, that's the way it's supposed to be done. If you were to use two /2 cables, you'd either be paralleling the neutral (310.4), and/or not running all the circuit conductors together (300.3(B)). Parallel neutrals are not allowed in this situation, so you've actually avoided a code violation by doing it ...


11

No, it will not be OK. A fan blade system is meant to be balanced. Even when all of the original equipment blades are in place, minor imbalances can occur and need to be corrected with weights from a balance kit. Failure to have a balanced fan causes wobble. If the wobble is bad enough, it can damage the motor, loosen the fan in its mounting and even cause ...


11

A lot of this comes down to aesthetics and practicality, so you will probably get lots of right answers. Here's my take: I would run your short piece of 2x4 level at the peak alongside 2 of the rafters. You will then be able to use a saddle fan box to mount your fan. This box slides over the 2x4, and is only fastened using a set screw. You then use wood ...


10

Yes, you can do that and it will swap the power to the light and fan. Just remember to turn off the power at the breaker before doing any work.


9

Two is "normal". Black for hot and white for neutral. Your fan has 3 wires (4 counting the green ground). You will have a white which you will connect to your neutral and you will have power for light and power for fan. Both of the power lines will be capped with your "black"/hot wire coming in. To have the light and fan controlled independently you ...


8

Do you have a multi-meter and an extension cord? If you do plug the cord into any outlet then drag it over to the fan and measure between the fan case and a ground pin on the cord... It should read close to 0 resistance.


8

Is this ceiling fan going to fall? There is nothing in the photo that tells me a fall is about to happen, but the installation looks poor, and I think you need to get under that cover. Will it cut your head off? No, if the physical support let’s go, it will dangle by it’s wiring like a wounded buzzard, but probably give you time to get clear. A bonk with a ...


7

That is a recessed light. That flex whip goes to a junction box mounted on the frame of the light. You need to remove the whole light, after removing the circuit cable from the junction box. DO NOT wire the fan box from that metallic flex whip. What you have looks something like this:


7

Okay, stop. The 10-32 screw requirement is for the lower screws which attach the fan to the box, not the upper screws which attach the box to the wood. You can see the holes that the 10-32 screws go into, in those tiny squares to left and right of your photo. It's entirely possible those squares do something clever, like capture a nut. But they are ...


7

Return that bracket and get a box only (no metal bar) rated for a fan. Run a length of 2x4 or 2x6 horizontally across from one rafter to the opposite one. Mount the box on the underside of this 2x. It will have no wobble and you can center it. You don't need bolts to attach this horizontal member; 2 to 4 screws on each end would do. You might need an ...


6

Use a fan control (dimmer designed specifically for fans) on the power supply to the fan. Common AC electric motors have a high low impedance on starting because velocity is 0, This draws a large initial current to get the motion started and as velocity increases impedance drops increases and the current draw decreases. A dimmer will reduce the wattage ...


6

While cutting off the bolt is definitely a good way to handle this situation. Here are a few things to try, before you take the destructive route. It also sounds like we might be having a bit of trouble with terminology, so I'll start with some definitions. As you can see, the bolt is the bit that looks like a screw, while the nut is the bob that twists on ...


6

Check the markings on different electrical boxes. According to the National Electrical Code (NEC) (which is not applicable in all areas, so check local codes), boxes that support ceiling fans should be listed for the purpose. National Electrical Code 2008 ARTICLE 314 Outlet, Device, Pull, and Junction Boxes; Conduit Bodies; Fittings; and Handhole Enclosures ...


6

Well for starters you can check the power at the switch to see of the switch has failed. This can be done with a power line wire test probe.....but do use care when dealing with AC power. It is dangerous stuff and can injure or kill if not handled properly. If this leaves you with a queasy feeling then now would be a good time to call in a professional ...


6

With another clockwise fan from the same maker, I was able to reverse the direction by interchanging the yellow and black wires as some answers here indicated. The explanation as I understood is that the rewiring changes the winding with which the capacitor is in series and hence the starting direction is inverted. In 3-phase motors, each of the three ...


6

You'll have to look at the inside of the box where the light is mounted. It should have printing inside it - although at the age of the house, it may not. Boxes that can support ceiling fans will be known as "acceptable for fan support": If you don't see something like that, you're going to need to take out some of the ceiling and replace to box with a fan ...


6

It sounds like whoever installed it, used the neutral as a hot and the ground as a neutral. Likely they wanted to control the fan and light separately, but only had two conductor cable between the switch and fixture. If you're installing a remote, you'll only need the two conductors. Without seeing what you have, this is what you might have to do. ...


6

Connect the black wire from the ceiling, to the black and blue wires from the fan/light. Connect the white wire from the ceiling, to the white/black and white/blue wires from the fan/light unit. Connect all bare/green grounding conductors. Cap the red and white/red wires from the fan/light unit. When you're done, the switch will turn on both the light and ...


6

As long as the twist-on wire connectors (colloquially known as "wire nuts", though that's a trademark) were the right size, attached firmly, and left no un-insulated wire exposed, electrical tape over them is unnecessary (and I believe is not recommended).


6

Ceiling fan boxes only have to support 35 lbs. ceiling fans (according to NEC), unless they are designed to support more. In which case they will be marked with the amount they can support, up to the maximum of 70 lbs. So no, I would not recommend hanging a punching bag (assuming a heavy bag) from a ceiling fan bracket.


6

It can be done, but the fan blades will need cleaned more often from any smoke/oil/residue from cooking in the kitchen as compared to elsewhere in the house. That may result in increased wear and tear, so you may end up replacing the unit sooner than if it were somewhere else in the house.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible