45

While caulk is fairly elastic, it handles better under compression than tension. By filling the tub all the way, you expand the gap quite a bit. Once the caulk is applied and the tub drained, the caulk compresses. During normal use, the caulk will likely never be in tension. As you'd have to add more weight than a tub full of water, before the caulk had to ...


31

This is a very controversial topic. Some plumbers swear that you must seal the toilet to the floor, while others swear that you should not seal the toilet to the floor. Some guys never do it, some guys always do it, and some guys only do it depending on the flooring used. It also appears that some toilet manufacturers mention it in the installation ...


22

I use foam rubber weather stripping gaskets: Alternatively, rubber hose works equally as well. Just buy it in a profile slightly wider than the gap, then tuck it in the gap. Friction will hold it in place. And easy to replace if you ever need to pull the stove out.


12

The actual plumbing seal doesn't have anything to do with caulking around the base of the toilet. That's all to do with the wax (typically) ring where the drain pipe and the toilet fit together, and the bolts that hold the toilet down to the floor. Caulking around the base will look a little nicer, and it'll keep water and cleaning fluids from seeping under ...


12

Those gaps are rarely sealed because the stove needs to be moveable for cleaning and service. Food will get behind and under the stove, and you'll want to be able to pull it out and clean. If you must do it, clear silicone (not a silicone blend) is typically the right product. It'll bond well to the countertop and the stainless (if properly cleaned), and ...


10

In all the shower installs I overseen, the company I worked for maintained that caulk is to be used in any inside corners except where excessive/standing water is. For example, caulk corners where tub and walls meet, and vertical inside corners where the walls come together. DO NOT caulk where the floor and walls meet, I personally seen caulk creep out of ...


9

The tube of caulk should include drying and curing times. It will vary based on the product so you definitely want to go by the manufacturer's recommendation and not some general guideline on the web somewhere. You are not the only person who does not want to have to wait a day or two before using their sink and bathtub and the caulk manufacturers know ...


8

Do not use tape, cut the tube of silicone at a 45 degree angle and apply it as if that is the final application. Now use a ~$5 tool like this*: to spread the silicone. Its triangle has three different radii from eighth to quarter inch. It is made of silicone so it works better than any of the above suggestions. I do this for a living in all the bathrooms in ...


8

As for the gaps between the bottom of the base board (skirting) and the floor ... that is normally covered over with a base shoe molding. Base shoe is a small dimension molding that can be pressed down to fit the variations in the floor surface. Base shoe molding is normally only skipped when carpeting is going to be installed on the floor. A nice trick ...


7

One more thing is to keep water in the tub when you caulk until the caulk dries. It's a pain to work this way, but flex in the floor under the tub when there's weight in it can help open up a gap in the caulk over time if it was caulked with no weight in the tub. Given that your caulk is doing a critical job it shouldn't have to do means you don't want to ...


7

There are metal and there are silicone rubber pieces with a T cross section designed for just for this purpose. https://www.amazon.com/Stovetop-Extender-SE24BLA-Oven-Guard/dp/B0027DW4QG. The tops of "slide-in" ranges cover the gap, but there is a gap when a "free-standing" range is used. These cover pieces work well for covering the gap. They keep anything ...


6

I have never heard of this recommendation. If you are caulking an area that will regularly be exposed to water (sink, shower, etc.) I use a silicone caulk. Silicone caulk is 100% waterproof so there is no need to add any extra sort of sealer.


6

You need a 100% silicone clear caulk and since it is near a sink I would get something that is mold resistant. Silicone for the sink to counter binding and its flexibility with temperature change. Clear because you don't want to have staining issues down the road. Also if you need to add caulk down the road - clear matches clear. GE Silicone II I have ...


6

Depends on the tub, to some extent, and how (or if) it was bedded when installed. Acrylic, fiberglass and thin steel tubs do noticeably deform with a load, especially if not bedded (I'm a fan of the good old plaster bed under the tub.) Most cast-iron tubs don't deform to any noticeable extent.


6

Some general input here as I install granite counters weekly. No way the granite is bound to each other trim piece probably has silicone (I hope) binding it to the wall you don't have to have silicone on dry areas. If someone spills a cup of soda on that counter, some will seep behind trim but it is pretty minimal (I have tested for fun). The trim piece ...


5

The best solution I've found is to fabricate a container out of PVC pipe and two end caps, found at any hardware store. I cut the PVC pipe to about 12", permanently glue one end cap onto the pipe and use the other end cap to seal the pipe without glue. I place a small rubber cap from my junk drawer onto the open/cut tip, spray a small amount of Bloxygen into ...


5

My Uncle was a plumber, so I called him, before re-caulking my newish bathtub for the 3rd time. I told him that no matter how good a job I did, scraping & cleaning out the old caulk, spraying a bleach & water solution into the crack, to kill any mildew that might be present, then wiping it down with a clean, damp cloth, once dry, then laying down the ...


5

That should have never been grout, joints between walls and other objects should be caulked because movement in those joints will cause the cracking that you now see, and the cracking can lead to water getting behind the tile. This also goes for inside corners in a shower, and the joint between bottom of the wall and the floor or tub..


5

If only a small section of the caulking has opened it may be worth re-applying fresh caulk to them with the hopes that it won't happen anyplace else. Since the repair is small cut out the compromised caulk and clean the surrounding areas with denatured alcohol. Apply fresh caulk forming it into place to match existing caulk. FYI: It is recommended, but not ...


5

safe to use the shower is a relative question. when will it be safe to use it so that its use doesn't compromise the caulking seal? never - it was already compromised the moment you did it that way. caulking shrinks as it dries, and the speed at which it dries changes how it polymerizes. when you make a huge blob of caulking, you seal in much of the ...


5

As isherwood noted, you don't want to do this in any permanent way. However, there are lots of companies that sell plastic/rubber strips that are meant to fit in this gap. Just Google strip to block gap between stove and counter and you'll find lots of fairly inexpensive options.


4

Caulking should be sealing. If it isn't you are using the wrong kind of caulk or your area was prepped wrong. The question is like asking if you need to put an extra coat on if it is cold outside.


4

The best way is to use glass cleaner spray on your hands. It stops the silicone sicking to your hands so you can get a smooth finish. It also gives the silicone a nice shine when dried.


4

For the joint between the counter top and the tiles, you can use any flexible, preferably mold resistant, caulking from your local hardware store. You should also be able to find it in a color that matches your grout. For the joint between the sink and the bench, I use a clear, waterproof, flexible one.


4

Just want to add:I used to use saliva on my finger,like a lot of people,but recently found out that the bacteria in your saliva starts the mold and discolouration,making the nice white bead around showers and sinks going black and moldy in no time(soaps water and two or three passes will get a neat clean job.)


4

This looks like this is one of those re-lined tubs. Get that caulked in as soon as possible. I don't mean to be an alarmist, but I am surprised that the sidewalls are set behind the tub's top edge, not over the tubs edge. The way this is now, relies only on the integrity of the caulk to keep the water out from the actual tub under the liner, where it would ...


4

Jack and Ecnerwal are both right in that the wall should overlap the tub. Your caulk probably failed prematurely because of the excessive runoff on it (and it is a bad caulk job). What would I do? Strip out all caulk. Then make sure that I fill the gap between wall and tub with Silicone. I would level the Silicone off at tub lip. Then I would recaulk ...


4

It looks like this is a tub that is not meant for installation up against a wall. Though it's hard to tell from the photo. Looks like a drop-in tub. Tubs that are meant for installation along a wall have a flange (not a lip) that the backer board goes over. This is what actually keeps the water in the tub. If this is purely a drop-in, you'll want to ...


4

Agreed with the research you found. Most vinyl siding, if installed correctly, will not require caulk at the sides of the windows and doors. Often there is actually a separate vinyl piece installed first at the side of the window that the ends of the siding tuck into. You are supposed to leave a gap at the end of the siding pieces to permit expansion and ...


4

I'd suggest you get a small tub of premixed grout, a float, a sponge, and spend an hour fixing the problem. Be sure to remove any loose grout. (Something as simple as a utility knife will work for this. Wear gloves to avoid skinned knuckles.) If you want an even more durable job, score all of the existing grout along the edge of the tile (so 2 cuts per grout ...


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