45

While caulk is fairly elastic, it handles better under compression than tension. By filling the tub all the way, you expand the gap quite a bit. Once the caulk is applied and the tub drained, the caulk compresses. During normal use, the caulk will likely never be in tension. As you'd have to add more weight than a tub full of water, before the caulk had to ...


37

You will have to remove it and reapply. The trick is soap. Have a bowl of water and a bar of soap. Dip your finger in the water then rub it on the soap before using it to smoothe the silicone.


30

This is a very controversial topic. Some plumbers swear that you must seal the toilet to the floor, while others swear that you should not seal the toilet to the floor. Some guys never do it, some guys always do it, and some guys only do it depending on the flooring used. It also appears that some toilet manufacturers mention it in the installation ...


22

I use foam rubber weather stripping gaskets: Alternatively, rubber hose works equally as well. Just buy it in a profile slightly wider than the gap, then tuck it in the gap. Friction will hold it in place. And easy to replace if you ever need to pull the stove out.


19

Definitely use a damp finger, and have a paper towel ready to wipe off your finger if you used too much caulk. Also, with silicone and difficult to clean surfaces, you want to tape both sides of your caulk line first. Remove the tape immediately after using your finger. This isn't needed on trim/painted walls since the caulk will disappear under the paint. ...


17

There's nothing you can do now other than remove it and re-apply. The pro's often just use their finger to smooth it out. For those of us who don't have the magical touch, they make tools that allow you to put a nice finish on. There are a variety of different tools - this is just the first one that came up in a search.


12

You don't have a caulking problem, you have a structural one. The walls and floor shouldn't be moving so much that caulk cracks. And caulk isn't an adhesive for holding up the soap dish or towel bar. Finally, a rocking toilet indicates the floor either wasn't properly leveled or that it's not structurally sound. If these are the issues you are noticing, then ...


12

In addition to DA01's suggestion, there are also smaller tubes of caulk that may be thin/small enough to angle into the casing corner. More costly, but you only need a little (if it fits).


12

The actual plumbing seal doesn't have anything to do with caulking around the base of the toilet. That's all to do with the wax (typically) ring where the drain pipe and the toilet fit together, and the bolts that hold the toilet down to the floor. Caulking around the base will look a little nicer, and it'll keep water and cleaning fluids from seeping under ...


12

Those gaps are rarely sealed because the stove needs to be moveable for cleaning and service. Food will get behind and under the stove, and you'll want to be able to pull it out and clean. If you must do it, clear silicone (not a silicone blend) is typically the right product. It'll bond well to the countertop and the stainless (if properly cleaned), and ...


9

The tube of caulk should include drying and curing times. It will vary based on the product so you definitely want to go by the manufacturer's recommendation and not some general guideline on the web somewhere. You are not the only person who does not want to have to wait a day or two before using their sink and bathtub and the caulk manufacturers know ...


8

Do not use tape, cut the tube of silicone at a 45 degree angle and apply it as if that is the final application. Now use a ~$5 tool like this*: to spread the silicone. Its triangle has three different radii from eighth to quarter inch. It is made of silicone so it works better than any of the above suggestions. I do this for a living in all the bathrooms in ...


8

If it's an interior door, I'd suggest not bothering. If you can't easily get the tube in there, my guess is you can't easily see it, so it's probably moot. If it's an exterior door, two ideas: remove the trim, apply the caulk, re-apply the trim cut a small bit of surgical hose and attach it to the end of the caulk and use that to apply it.


8

In all the shower installs I overseen, the company I worked for maintained that caulk is to be used in any inside corners except where excessive/standing water is. For example, caulk corners where tub and walls meet, and vertical inside corners where the walls come together. DO NOT caulk where the floor and walls meet, I personally seen caulk creep out of ...


8

As for the gaps between the bottom of the base board (skirting) and the floor ... that is normally covered over with a base shoe molding. Base shoe is a small dimension molding that can be pressed down to fit the variations in the floor surface. Base shoe molding is normally only skipped when carpeting is going to be installed on the floor. A nice trick ...


7

If you do it your self (not endorsing, and see comment by The Evil Greebo) you could put a more secure plug in by using hydraulic cement. To ensure that it does not come out, holes or cracks are usually back cut (the hole is made wider below the opening so that its diameter is greater than the diameter of the opening). This can be done with a small masonry ...


7

One more thing is to keep water in the tub when you caulk until the caulk dries. It's a pain to work this way, but flex in the floor under the tub when there's weight in it can help open up a gap in the caulk over time if it was caulked with no weight in the tub. Given that your caulk is doing a critical job it shouldn't have to do means you don't want to ...


6

Yep, use a paintable latex bathroom caulk. We always use PolySeamSeal (now owned by LockTite, available at Lowe's).


6

The key criteria for me is the size of the holes. If you used brads, then I have no problem with using caulk, especially on baseboards. The only possible downside is if you leave a fingerprint in it. You have to have eagle eyes to pick out a small hole like that. With crown molding though, I'd plan on a lightweight spackle. Mostly because of the cost ...


6

I would personally use Loctite PL Polyurethane Concrete Crack & Masonry Sealant, which will adhere well but still provide a degree of flexibility as your pipe moves within the brick. It's grey, but you can also mix in a little concrete dust or dirt to give it that "I'm not shiny caulk, honest!" look. The PL product should be available at your local ...


6

No you never silicone a toilet to the floor. If you do and have a leak, you won't be able too tell until it's too late. Then if you do have a leak and can't tell, there goes your floor.


6

Ideally it would be one continuous bead of caulking, however for 3/8" of a gap at the very top, you will probably be OK just adding a bit more caulking to fill it in. However, if you don't want to have to touch it again for a while--and considering the low cost and relative ease of applying it--I think I would be inclined to remove the existing bead and ...


6

You need a 100% silicone clear caulk and since it is near a sink I would get something that is mold resistant. Silicone for the sink to counter binding and its flexibility with temperature change. Clear because you don't want to have staining issues down the road. Also if you need to add caulk down the road - clear matches clear. GE Silicone II I have ...


6

I have never heard of this recommendation. If you are caulking an area that will regularly be exposed to water (sink, shower, etc.) I use a silicone caulk. Silicone caulk is 100% waterproof so there is no need to add any extra sort of sealer.


6

That should have never been grout, joints between walls and other objects should be caulked because movement in those joints will cause the cracking that you now see, and the cracking can lead to water getting behind the tile. This also goes for inside corners in a shower, and the joint between bottom of the wall and the floor or tub..


5

The best solution I've found is to fabricate a container out of PVC pipe and two end caps, found at any hardware store. I cut the PVC pipe to about 12", permanently glue one end cap onto the pipe and use the other end cap to seal the pipe without glue. I place a small rubber cap from my junk drawer onto the open/cut tip, spray a small amount of Bloxygen into ...


5

I'd replace the caulk if it begins to crack or shows signs of mold. Old caulk can be perfectly fine as long as it's not cracking and allowing water to penetrate. If there's a lot of movement in the structure, expect to need to replace the caulk more often.


5

Depends on the tub, to some extent, and how (or if) it was bedded when installed. Acrylic, fiberglass and thin steel tubs do noticeably deform with a load, especially if not bedded (I'm a fan of the good old plaster bed under the tub.) Most cast-iron tubs don't deform to any noticeable extent.


5

safe to use the shower is a relative question. when will it be safe to use it so that its use doesn't compromise the caulking seal? never - it was already compromised the moment you did it that way. caulking shrinks as it dries, and the speed at which it dries changes how it polymerizes. when you make a huge blob of caulking, you seal in much of the ...


5

As isherwood noted, you don't want to do this in any permanent way. However, there are lots of companies that sell plastic/rubber strips that are meant to fit in this gap. Just Google strip to block gap between stove and counter and you'll find lots of fairly inexpensive options.


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