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21

You can get a slight life extension if you take the nozzle off, put a screw in it, then use a clean spare nozzle, put some cling film [US saran wrap??] over the open end & screw the new nozzle over it. The screw will pull the hardened silicone out of the used nozzle next time you need it, so you don't overall get through as many nozzles. The cling film ...


12

Something I've found that's not mentioned yet is the effect of air on adhesives. While sealing up the tip as much as possible is certainly sound advice, I've discovered that tubes and tape last MUCH longer when bagged. After doing a number on the tip, I put caulk in a grocery bag and roll it up. This wrapping prevents fresh air from getting to the tip and ...


7

For long term storage (more than 1 or 2 days), I remove the nozzle, put some plastic wrap/cling film across the opening and put the nozzle back on. I've been able to keep partially-used tubes for almost a year with this method. You either clean out the nozzle or put a new one on when you are ready to use it. For just 1 or 2 days, I just wrap the plastic ...


6

Caulk the base of the nozzle to create a perfect seal (Do this before using it so you do not expose the unused silicone.) I've had this stuff store for more than 2 years using this technique. I tend to do this before loading the tube into the gun but you can do it after just the same. You don't need a lot and you can push out a little caulk with pressure ...


5

It might be marketing, or it might be fact (or both!) but caulking that's designed specifically for kitchen/bath applications has an anti-microbial element. Assuming your existing roofing caulk isn't too old, it would probably work. It might stink more than expected for a little while. If it was me, I'd get a fresh tube of kitchen/bath silicone from a place ...


5

Toothpaste caps. When a nozzle isn’t being used, a toothpaste cap can screw on nicely. Also bag the whole tube so it doesn’t set from the back. The relevant science is that the silicone sets using water, but the hard silicone is still permeable to water vapour.


4

As a frame challenge, why are you buying these products in "bulk" when you know you aren't going to be using that much? I know it's hard to estimate many projects, but if you are only using 5% of the caulk/glue/whatever, then you should be buying smaller packages, such as a 0.5-3 fl. oz. tube with a screw on cap. Most, if not all, of the products ...


3

There exist many kinds of relatively inexpensive reusable caps -- I prefer the ones like these: Image source. The pins ensure that the nozzle isn't blocked by the solidified caulk.


3

You will never get an indefinite life. But I use the caps and when I find the nozzle has solidified I put a new nozzle on. If it has hardened further then new tube required. Also when doing jobs that need multiple tubes I reuse one nozzle, with a carefully prepared tip, across the tubes so have many spares.


2

Use the picture below as a guide: You can caulk above and in the middle of the trim pieces on the side - in yellow. the appropriate caulk here is the DAP Alex Plus. Yes going there because I use this caulk because it settles with the smallest bead possible and it is a nice white. I am sure there are others just as good, this is what we use. You make the ...


2

If caulk is leaking past the plunger and out the back of the tube, just throw away the tube. The amount of time you waste cleaning up all the squeeze out will be worth far more (even if you only bill your time at minimum wage) than the purchase price of a new tube. Once you've made a mess of your caulk gun, you'll kick yourself for being "penny wise and ...


1

It's not necessary to remove the grout from under the bottom of the tile (it's not ideal from an expansion and contraction point of view, but that is another matter). As long as you have a 90 degree clean area between the tile and the tub, you are okay to reapply new silicone. Buy the best you can find and thoroughly clean the surface before applying. Try to ...


1

When you cut the tube inner part open, squeeze a little out and screw the nozzle onto the material, this gets an airtight seal at the base. When finished, squeeze a little out the end and leave it to set. Next time you need the tube gently pull the set material out (works up to a week or three). If it's a long time, simply remove and replace the nozzle ...


1

So, filling a bath with water before applying sealant (caulk), is going to make the job of applying it a whole lot more difficult depending on the size of your bath and where it is situated. You either have to lean over the water at odd angles, or actually get in the bath with the water in it! I can see absolutely no issue with applying the sealant and right ...


1

I'd suggest you get some wide flat metal flashing (height of log plus a couple of inches) and tack it at the next seam up. The flashing will be out on a bit of an angle, and will stop a lot of water from flowing down to the foundation/log joint. Now you can let everything dry naturally and caulk from the outside at your convenience. I'd lean toward a product ...


1

Don’t use a hair dryer just a fan will be better you don’t want to heat the log in a spot like that and damage the finish.


1

Grout will also mildew over time. The other problem is that grout is not as good as caulk in repelling water which is the reason it is used where shower surfaces meet at 90 degree angles. Your installer did the right thing by caulking those corners. Eventually, you'll want to remove the old caulk as it starts to break down and recaulk it. It's a basic ...


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