Hot answers tagged

47

Yes! the tool is called a caulk gun. Use the spout cutter for cutting off the tip of the tube; then use the seal punch tool for poking holes in the foil seal.


45

While caulk is fairly elastic, it handles better under compression than tension. By filling the tub all the way, you expand the gap quite a bit. Once the caulk is applied and the tub drained, the caulk compresses. During normal use, the caulk will likely never be in tension. As you'd have to add more weight than a tub full of water, before the caulk had to ...


28

First I would not even have a conversation with that contractor. Gone instantly. If he is cutting corners here, what else would he do without you knowing? Bye. Caulk in corners - I have had to do this as a temporary fix but here are your issues: your corner isn't really a corner. Corners look good because of the sharp angle. You can for sure see ...


13

Expired caulk You bet it expires, and fast. That is because of the chemistry of this type of caulk. The stuff is nearly magic, but that comes at a price. Extremes of temperature are not kind to it either. That's not a surprise, even latex paint has that problem. I have had your experience myself, grabbing random caulk found around the shop and ...


11

No. Caulk might look great for a short time (if it doesn't shrink to oblivion right away), but it doesn't bond to the cut end of the gypsum panel at all. Eventually it'll crack loose. You need tape in most cases to create a solid bond (tape-on-paper, essentially), and to add structure and continuity to the joint. That said, I have used caulk to repair ...


10

In all the shower installs I overseen, the company I worked for maintained that caulk is to be used in any inside corners except where excessive/standing water is. For example, caulk corners where tub and walls meet, and vertical inside corners where the walls come together. DO NOT caulk where the floor and walls meet, I personally seen caulk creep out of ...


8

The answer will depend on the exact type of sealant you used. For the standard silicone sealant (acetoxy- condensation cure or "acid cure": smells of vinegar as it cures), the curing reaction actually requires water to take place. So high humidity or use of water in smoothing should not have prevented the curing. This type of sealant usually uses ...


8

Rub a little Tabasco™ sauce or other hot sauce of your choosing on the caulked joint. That will cure most critters of chewing on things they shouldn't. Granted, it's a bit odd that the cat chooses to gnaw on silicone caulk, but usually a good hot sauce will kill the desire to eat the object.


7

One more thing is to keep water in the tub when you caulk until the caulk dries. It's a pain to work this way, but flex in the floor under the tub when there's weight in it can help open up a gap in the caulk over time if it was caulked with no weight in the tub. Given that your caulk is doing a critical job it shouldn't have to do means you don't want to ...


7

I think there is a claim there, not well founded, but a claim. Of course the insurance companies are trying to keep the payout down as low as possible. There is always a chance for wall damage but extreme care in removal will lessen the chances. Carefully score the caulk at the junction where the base and wall meet. Start with a light cut first, using a ...


6

My Uncle was a plumber, so I called him, before re-caulking my newish bathtub for the 3rd time. I told him that no matter how good a job I did, scraping & cleaning out the old caulk, spraying a bleach & water solution into the crack, to kill any mildew that might be present, then wiping it down with a clean, damp cloth, once dry, then laying down the ...


6

Depends on the tub, to some extent, and how (or if) it was bedded when installed. Acrylic, fiberglass and thin steel tubs do noticeably deform with a load, especially if not bedded (I'm a fan of the good old plaster bed under the tub.) Most cast-iron tubs don't deform to any noticeable extent.


6

Code requires toilets to be caulked at the floor, that, IMO is a mistake. If the toilet does develop a leak, it will be restricted under the toilet and the subfloor, and may leak for a while before it is detected. So much for that. The toilet can be shimmed to keep it from rocking. Because of the rocking, what is not leaking now eventually will leak. The ...


6

The grout may help to keep the toilet stabile for awhile, but to ensure it remains level and secure you should install shims. I've used plastic building shims that can be snapped-off at 2 inch increments. Any flat material that is water-proof will do. Loosen the bolts at the base of the toilet first. Place a level on the rim of the bowl and shim up the ...


6

In the bath tub the only joint needing caulk (commonly) is the wall/tub intersection. If your pet only is interested in pulling out caulking you might try repairing the joint with silicone, but than covering it with a plastic wall molding This is installed with an adhesive. While I wouldn't recommend using this exclusively to repel water it would protect ...


5

Caulk is a bad choice, because it can't be sanded. You can't get it perfectly even with the flat surface, because it stick to everything it touches. You will end up with a slightly raised area around the hole, and it will show more readily than putty, because caulk has such a different consistency. And, yes, caulk will shrink just like putty, but unlike ...


5

safe to use the shower is a relative question. when will it be safe to use it so that its use doesn't compromise the caulking seal? never - it was already compromised the moment you did it that way. caulking shrinks as it dries, and the speed at which it dries changes how it polymerizes. when you make a huge blob of caulking, you seal in much of the ...


5

Blocking their hiding spaces and places with air flow probably displaced them. With the area sealed up they won’t have food traveling that area so they are probably getting away from the smell and looking for new places to reside.


5

It might be marketing, or it might be fact (or both!) but caulking that's designed specifically for kitchen/bath applications has an anti-microbial element. Assuming your existing roofing caulk isn't too old, it would probably work. It might stink more than expected for a little while. If it was me, I'd get a fresh tube of kitchen/bath silicone from a place ...


4

It looks like this is a tub that is not meant for installation up against a wall. Though it's hard to tell from the photo. Looks like a drop-in tub. Tubs that are meant for installation along a wall have a flange (not a lip) that the backer board goes over. This is what actually keeps the water in the tub. If this is purely a drop-in, you'll want to ...


4

Jack and Ecnerwal are both right in that the wall should overlap the tub. Your caulk probably failed prematurely because of the excessive runoff on it (and it is a bad caulk job). What would I do? Strip out all caulk. Then make sure that I fill the gap between wall and tub with Silicone. I would level the Silicone off at tub lip. Then I would recaulk ...


4

This looks like this is one of those re-lined tubs. Get that caulked in as soon as possible. I don't mean to be an alarmist, but I am surprised that the sidewalls are set behind the tub's top edge, not over the tubs edge. The way this is now, relies only on the integrity of the caulk to keep the water out from the actual tub under the liner, where it would ...


4

Backer rod should be compressed in a joint. If it doesn't stay in the joint on it's own, then you need to get a wider piece. They come in varying diameters and you should choose one slightly wider than your gap.


4

the water pulls the tub to the position it is in when you take a bath the sides slitly deflect and it pulls down from the surround so filling is the best practice to fill the voids and have a longer lasting seal that wont leak


4

You certainly can, if you do it carefully. Here are my tips: Use clear silicone. Any color (including white) will be much more conspicuous over the grout joints. Clear will transfer the existing colors and blend much better, almost disappearing. Run a roll of masking tape along the floor, tight to the tub. Once you've tooled your caulk you can remove this ...


4

Apparently there are some caulks which are actually made for this specific purpose. I doubt any standard "painter's caulk" would work well, but this is worth bearing in mind if you are in a market where this is available. The specific example I just saw was from Germany - the product "KNAUF Power Elast" which I spotted in a video. Presumably there are ...


4

I’ve used a high quality no shrink paintable caulk when I’ve made a very clean cut drywall edge both on an inside wall to wall and a wall to stipled textured ceiling. I finger tooled and it not only looks great, it saved a ton of time and finesse and continues to look great. I fully understand the drywall purists position but take a good look at all the ...


4

I think squeezing in enough caulk will fill the gap. You can tape part of the opening to seal it so that you can build a bit of pressure up in there to fill all the crevasses. It’s important to seal it from the inside too if you can, however keep an eye on the area for a couple weeks, especially right after you do the repair.


3

If you saturate toilet paper with the remover and slap it on your vertical surface it will stick there and hold it against the caulking. Practice a couple times with water to get a feel for the appropriate amount of moisture. Scrape off as much as possible before you start in with the remover though. Just to clarify, you should be using a plastic blade in ...


3

Removing caulking can be time consuming, especially in the bathroom. From my experience there is no magic solution. I recommend these tools: flat head screw driver small paint scrapper (plastic as to not scratch any finishes) hair dryer Using the hair dryer, heat up the caulking, then use paint scrapper to loosen the caulking by pushing on top and bellow, ...


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