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13

Removing the old pipe First you want to make sure the section of pipe that will remain, is properly supported (you don't want it falling). Then you'll want to install some temporary supports, to catch the portion of the pipe that you'll be removing. Use a chain cutter, hammer and cold chisel, or grinder to break the pipe a few inches before the hub on the ...


7

For cutting the pipe, go rent a chain pipe cutter (aka soil pipe cutter). It will make short work of the pipe and not be too messy. It will make a clean enough edge that a Fernco coupling (like you have a picture of) will work fine. Obviously you will need to add some strapping to secure the horizontal run of iron pipe if you go this route because you don'...


6

You're going to have to cut out the pipe, and replace it with PVC drain pipe. You can get rubber connectors (fernco) for the transition. Here's a youtube how-to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFaJyIzyiYA


5

Option 2, definitely. Height issues aside, a damaged flange gives a high risk of loose toilet syndrome, which turns into leaky toilet syndrome, which turns into angry spouse syndrome when you have to re-tile.


5

Why is it rotten? Does it bode ill for the rest of the system? I would replace as much cast as is easily doable with ABS. I would cut above and below where the K sink drain comes in and replace everything back to the sink with ABS. Is there a particularly good sawzall blade for this? Standard metal blade will do - I just cut a 4" myself no problem. (...


4

That is a ceiling light mounting plate, used with knob-and-tube wiring. The flathead screws would fasten the plate to a ceiling joist, and the wires were fed through the larger holes. The center hole is intended to support the weight of the light, via another part that is missing from your example. I think the setscrews held small insulators, probably ...


3

If cost is the only factor, a hacksaw is hands down the cheapest option. It's also the slowest. An angle grinder would be next up. a 4.5" with a diamond blade should do the trick, but the diamond blade will cost more than the hacksaw. Best bet? A circular or miter saw with a metal cutting blade.


3

The pipes were sealed with lead. Prior to pouring the lead a packing material ("oakum" not sure on spelling) was packed into the joint. This material can be cut out with a screwdriver, trying to heat it would make a big mess. In most cases when I need to open a cast drain I will cut a small section out at least the diameter of the pipe but usually slightly ...


3

Cast Iron drain pipe with Bell fittings, these are packed with oakum and overlaid with hot poured lead driven in place to seal and then a second layer poured in to complete the seal. It may only need the lead driven in to repack the oakum and a new layer of lead poured. Contact a plumber with knowledge about old drain systems, cast iron can take a long ...


3

Ductile Iron dose rust but at a much slower rate than Cast Iron I only use it when the owner wants the old style piping (Okam and lead) for the seal. I believe it will out last you and any kids if it has a protective coating it will last over 75 years if memory serves but I haven't installed any in years I usually change to ABS and a no hub (also called a ...


3

A silicon based glue should be able to withstand these temperatures. Makes sure to verify the max temp on the package. Silicon glue


3

You have used wrong adapter-connector to connect cast iron pipe to ABS/PVC. Per Code when connecting the ABS or PVC to cast iron you should use No-Hub Adapter fitting. Rubber connector or Flexible Coupling are allowed only under ground. As defined in the Uniform Plumbing Code section 705.4.2. a mechanical joint shielded coupling for hubless cast-iron pipe ...


2

Remember, cast iron is brittle. A chain-breaker does not actually cut it, it cracks and separates it. You can use the same principle: use the angle grinder make a groove to weaken material around the perimeter of the material right where you want it to break. Then allow the grinding wheel to penetrate all the way through at only a single spot (a 1/4" or ...


2

DIY cutting cast iron is pretty easy, but it's a little counter-intuitive. Cast iron is extremely brittle compared to steel. That's important for how you approach it. Cutting it with a sawzall blade is going to be very slow and frustrating. I think the best choice of blade would be along the lines of the diamond-grit "friction" blades, but any sawzall ...


2

Coupling a drain through the joists are even done in new work, sometimes it is the only way. Cast iron and especially any galvanized pipe connected to it will sure rust through over the ages. If you have any galvanized pipe in place and you yank on it a bit, you may find it readily cracks loose or separates at the joints. If the cast iron is in good shape, ...


2

Moisture pooling in the joints like that suggests standing water in the pipe, which will eventually rust it out for sure. If this is the case, there's probably a blockage of some sort downstream that's resulting in sewage backup (ew). I would definitely address that first. After that, you can decide whether or not it's worth replacing pipe. My guess is that ...


2

You can use what's called a "come along", it's a portable hand operated winch-like tool for moving things short distances with a lot of force. The thing is, you will need to find a point at which to anchor one end that is significantly stronger than the bar, like a fence post, otherwise if you just connect to another bar just like it, you bend them both. ...


2

Yes, that is signs of corrosion and in another 100-150 years, that will result in leaks in that pipe...


2

If it's all one piece I'm inclined to believe you have a donut and coupling similar to the ones below installed in you cast iron pipe. I have only used these one time, but I had to hammer the piece of PVC into to rubber donut because it fit so tight. Some PVC fittings have a lip at the tip, like the one below, that would make it harder to remove once it ...


1

Is that the stanchion onto which the work table is hanging? If so, you are never going to get enough strength again to be useful. The moment of leverage for that is so far out there that any force pressing on the table is going to make any repair fail. I would suggest finding the mfr of the drill press and finding out how to buy a replacement part.


1

A railing ( tubular or angle) it it very likely to be "mild" steel , aka -carbon steel. It contains 0.1 to 0.2 % carbon , a little manganese and silicon. Highly weldable with standard filler metal . MIG is the easiest , gas shielded solid steel wire or flux cored steel wire ( the flux generates gas to shield the weld.). You want the most common standard ...


1

You should use plastic (ABS) for any replacement runs if possible. Yes you can use clamp couplings underground (for iron-to-iron and iron-to-plastic connections) but not just any type. You need heavy duty clamps listed for that service (not cheap "no-hubs" from the ubiquitous orange big box). We call them "mission bands" but that is a brand name (no ...


1

Yes you can clean it up, but hopefully what is under it looks better that what you see now. It looks like somebody's sloppy caulk job.


1

Keep in mind that through condensation alone, the humidity in the air and temperature variation, if those risers can breath they will accumulate water. I would, as you have said, drill small weep holes as low as possible. With normal evaporation, this will mitigate the problem the best. Keep the lower plates painted with a good quality paint and you ...


1

Since this unit is one in a building of condos, an improvised DIY job is not acceptable; the job must be done right. I would assume that there is a collar that the pipe passes through, that is, the concrete is not adhering to the cast iron pipe. I would think that you must remove the broken section by making at least three cuts with an iron pipe cutter. ...


1

Galvanised steel has a distinctive "spangled" appearance. The crystalline structure of the Zinc is visible. There are two main types hot-dip galvanised electrogalvanised (electroplated zinc) You can often tell if something has been hot-dip galvanised. It looks like a thicker coating is present. This is better.


1

You will need to use something other than your box store hi temp paints if you want really good results. They are more like Hi-temp Coatings than they are paints. Before Painting you will need to do a really thorough cleaning of them. Your preparation work is the HARDEST PART and the MOST important part of a good durable paint job. Anybody can squeeze a ...


1

Yes, you can drill and tap the hole for threads. You may have figured that out already.


1

As it turned out, there was no leak between the tank and the bowl, but it was a crack in the closet bend. When I looked into the closet bend, I could see what looked like a crack or pitting, but I didn't expect it to be the source of the leak, because it didn't leak when I poured water over it. Having exhausted other options, I decided to try fixing it ...


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