5

Option 2, definitely. Height issues aside, a damaged flange gives a high risk of loose toilet syndrome, which turns into leaky toilet syndrome, which turns into angry spouse syndrome when you have to re-tile.


4

That is a ceiling light mounting plate, used with knob-and-tube wiring. The flathead screws would fasten the plate to a ceiling joist, and the wires were fed through the larger holes. The center hole is intended to support the weight of the light, via another part that is missing from your example. I think the setscrews held small insulators, probably ...


4

The answer is NO: electrical wire has to be used in an approved manner. UF is approved for direct burial and use in an approved wireway or other listed methods. a sewer pipe is not an approved method in any of the articles associated with NEC 340.10: used permitted for underground feeder type UF. the answer is NO it is not permitted.


3

If cost is the only factor, a hacksaw is hands down the cheapest option. It's also the slowest. An angle grinder would be next up. a 4.5" with a diamond blade should do the trick, but the diamond blade will cost more than the hacksaw. Best bet? A circular or miter saw with a metal cutting blade.


3

You have used wrong adapter-connector to connect cast iron pipe to ABS/PVC. Per Code when connecting the ABS or PVC to cast iron you should use No-Hub Adapter fitting. Rubber connector or Flexible Coupling are allowed only under ground. As defined in the Uniform Plumbing Code section 705.4.2. a mechanical joint shielded coupling for hubless cast-iron pipe ...


3

Cast Iron drain pipe with Bell fittings, these are packed with oakum and overlaid with hot poured lead driven in place to seal and then a second layer poured in to complete the seal. It may only need the lead driven in to repack the oakum and a new layer of lead poured. Contact a plumber with knowledge about old drain systems, cast iron can take a long ...


3

Ductile Iron dose rust but at a much slower rate than Cast Iron I only use it when the owner wants the old style piping (Okam and lead) for the seal. I believe it will out last you and any kids if it has a protective coating it will last over 75 years if memory serves but I haven't installed any in years I usually change to ABS and a no hub (also called a ...


3

The pipes were sealed with lead. Prior to pouring the lead a packing material ("oakum" not sure on spelling) was packed into the joint. This material can be cut out with a screwdriver, trying to heat it would make a big mess. In most cases when I need to open a cast drain I will cut a small section out at least the diameter of the pipe but usually slightly ...


2

Coupling a drain through the joists are even done in new work, sometimes it is the only way. Cast iron and especially any galvanized pipe connected to it will sure rust through over the ages. If you have any galvanized pipe in place and you yank on it a bit, you may find it readily cracks loose or separates at the joints. If the cast iron is in good shape, ...


2

Moisture pooling in the joints like that suggests standing water in the pipe, which will eventually rust it out for sure. If this is the case, there's probably a blockage of some sort downstream that's resulting in sewage backup (ew). I would definitely address that first. After that, you can decide whether or not it's worth replacing pipe. My guess is that ...


2

You can use what's called a "come along", it's a portable hand operated winch-like tool for moving things short distances with a lot of force. The thing is, you will need to find a point at which to anchor one end that is significantly stronger than the bar, like a fence post, otherwise if you just connect to another bar just like it, you bend them both. ...


2

Yes, that is signs of corrosion and in another 100-150 years, that will result in leaks in that pipe...


2

If it's all one piece I'm inclined to believe you have a donut and coupling similar to the ones below installed in you cast iron pipe. I have only used these one time, but I had to hammer the piece of PVC into to rubber donut because it fit so tight. Some PVC fittings have a lip at the tip, like the one below, that would make it harder to remove once it ...


2

The black is Orangeburg pipe, a layered (tar-based?) pipe. I did not think it was allowed inside, I have only ever found it as vents not as drains inside , yes it should be replaced with plastic , it usually falls apart in ground but your’s looks to be in good shape, (that could be ready to fail) , yes replace it if doing any remodeling before it breaks. ...


2

There seems to be a 3/16" thick layer of crud on the inside surface of the hub. Scrape that out and then try the 4" "donut"


2

I wouldn't. I'll leave it to others with more knowledge to tell you why it can't be done. In a similar situation I discovered that there was a slight gap at the side of the pipe. I was able to attach a weight to a string a drop it down 40' beside a pipe after I removed some fire blocking material. Once the string ran the full length I pulled an extra 40' ...


2

Express line to a red tag Not only is this a bad idea practically speaking due to the high potential of leaking sewer gases into the house at the points the cable enters and exits the pipe, your proposal blatantly violates IRC P3101.3 (or IPC 901.4, which says the same thing): P3101.3 Use limitations. The plumbing vent system shall not be used for purposes ...


2

The video worked for me but I believe it is a thru bolt as you can see the head on the other side in one quick segment of the video. I have had similar issues with bolts in cast (the leg is cast iron) . I have never found any penetrating oil that will work for most of these cases. Heat is your friend here. Use a torch to get the metal red hot! Once the metal ...


1

It sounds like you can get at the pipe from below. I would highly suggest cutting some of the cast iron away and using a rubber gasket coupling (i.e. a Fernco) to transition to PVC. Then you can put a regular PVC pipe flange up there and avoid the problem of depth entirely.


1

Believe it or not, we were able to fix the gate just by pulling on it. We opened the gate to a point where it was sitting on the ground, then I braced it with just a foot on the bottom edge and yanked as hard as I could, twice. It surprisingly bent pretty easily. I hadn't noticed before but the gate was also bent on both sides where it connected to the ...


1

A railing ( tubular or angle) it it very likely to be "mild" steel , aka -carbon steel. It contains 0.1 to 0.2 % carbon , a little manganese and silicon. Highly weldable with standard filler metal . MIG is the easiest , gas shielded solid steel wire or flux cored steel wire ( the flux generates gas to shield the weld.). You want the most common standard ...


1

You should use plastic (ABS) for any replacement runs if possible. Yes you can use clamp couplings underground (for iron-to-iron and iron-to-plastic connections) but not just any type. You need heavy duty clamps listed for that service (not cheap "no-hubs" from the ubiquitous orange big box). We call them "mission bands" but that is a brand name (no ...


1

Since it’s on the end, you might try attaching a length of sturdier steel pipe (schedule 40?) to the bent bar, maybe even with duct tape. Then use clamps/straps to bend towards the steel pipe. This would avoid bending any adjacent bars and doesn’t put too much additional stress on the hinges besides the added weight of the pipe.


1

I know that plastic convertors exist(ed) as the plumber used one for us... You would need to remove material aound the pipe to provide sufficient connection. I am not aware if they make an internal plastic version - but that would mean cleaning and sealing the internal surface which tends to be in worse condition that the outside...


1

Is that the stanchion onto which the work table is hanging? If so, you are never going to get enough strength again to be useful. The moment of leverage for that is so far out there that any force pressing on the table is going to make any repair fail. I would suggest finding the mfr of the drill press and finding out how to buy a replacement part.


1

Keep in mind that through condensation alone, the humidity in the air and temperature variation, if those risers can breath they will accumulate water. I would, as you have said, drill small weep holes as low as possible. With normal evaporation, this will mitigate the problem the best. Keep the lower plates painted with a good quality paint and you ...


1

Since this unit is one in a building of condos, an improvised DIY job is not acceptable; the job must be done right. I would assume that there is a collar that the pipe passes through, that is, the concrete is not adhering to the cast iron pipe. I would think that you must remove the broken section by making at least three cuts with an iron pipe cutter. ...


1

Galvanised steel has a distinctive "spangled" appearance. The crystalline structure of the Zinc is visible. There are two main types hot-dip galvanised electrogalvanised (electroplated zinc) You can often tell if something has been hot-dip galvanised. It looks like a thicker coating is present. This is better.


1

You will need to use something other than your box store hi temp paints if you want really good results. They are more like Hi-temp Coatings than they are paints. Before Painting you will need to do a really thorough cleaning of them. Your preparation work is the HARDEST PART and the MOST important part of a good durable paint job. Anybody can squeeze a ...


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