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10

The post looks reasonably adequate as it was originally built even by modern standards. If it wasn't you'd have seen disaster long ago, when it first started to decay. To maintain the style detail I'd rebuild to match, using pressure-treated lumber. By doing so you eliminate the need to cut that notch and you end up with a more robust post. A single post ...


4

To secure the base of the steel support you can use a concrete screw. TapCon is a ubiquitous brand TapCon screw that has worked well for me. You will need to drill into the concrete with the correct size bit (5/32" or 3/16") to accommodate the screw length. Another fastener type (Redhead is one brand) Redhead bolt is one in which after drilling a proper ...


4

At the ground, you're mostly concerned with keeping the posts located. You don't want bumps to slide them around. A simple steel pin or bolt in the concrete is adequate. If you like, use a short stack of washers to keep the wood (mostly) out of contact with the concrete to improve longevity. At the top, I'd use 1/2" lag screws, countersunk and piloted. Two ...


3

1: You state you made a sun room out of your carport ? Just making certain we are on the same page. Here is your problem : Before you enclosed the carport it was exposed to the outside temperatures just like the roof was, now that it is enclosed you have a temperature differential. It is warmer on the underside than it is on the top side. Insulate the roof /...


3

Concrete does not react well with normal wood, so don't pour up along the post. That's why the little block is on top of the pier you have, its made either of pressure treated wood, or redwood. If you really want a better pier, pour one a little larger then what you have, and you can include a metal hold down or strap to make sure nothing moves later. (and ...


2

Most people in your situation trench the driveway, drain it off somewhere, and put a grate on it. The speed bump could work if it was big enough, but chances are (1) some water would come over it, and (2) you'd probably hate it enough that you trench in the future.


2

If you live in an earthquake zone, it may already have a feature to prevent that, such as a central steel pin. In any case, slap-dash "reinforcing" can have effects opposite what you expect (could be your new system would break the post where it entered the concrete by concentrating forces there) - and the rot issue was already pointed out by #2448131 I ...


2

I highly doubt that a canvas carport is going to withstand 30mph wind. Does the manufacturer claim that it does,or are you just hoping? If the manufacturer has provided base plates with screw holes, then these should be sufficient for the design loading (whatever design loading the manufacturer chose). You can try making the carport-to-ground connection ...


2

Two things about an exterior concrete slab. Proper drainage. Pitch the slab slightly so the water drains away. 1/2" to 1" for 10' of run should be enough since it is covered. Proper compaction. Make sure the material under the slab is properly compacted. If you believe it needs more sand or gravel for better drainage or to level the area, then that added ...


2

I had the same situation one time and the carpenters just put a sheathing over it to hide everything. The sheathing was no thicker that wood paneling and finished very nicely after painting.


2

The top could be a traditional mortise and tenon joint (possibly haunched for resistance to twist). You'd want the tenon to be pushed to the interior in any case, as the end grain on the joist is weak. But @isherwood is right that mechanical fasteners are a strong alternative.


1

The same thing happened to me once. At first I was unhappy because the nails poked though, but then as vin944 stated, its proper for them to protrude through. I talked to the roofers and they gave me some 1/4 in. sheathing. I laid them all out flat on the driveway, painted them, then nailed them up with some help. It looked much better and gave it a finished ...


1

Hi this is Jason of Builderbeast. I built this pergola, and was also not thrilled about the size of that Simpson connector. I had a larger 1/2" stainless mount fabricated. It extended about 12" up the column.


1

This is Jason Roberson of Builderbeast. I built this pergola out of Western Red Cedar a few years back. At the top I mortised the post into the beam and pinned it from the side with a ledger lock, then plugged the hole. Everything is cut at 11 degrees. I made a jig for all cuts for consistency and calculated all the measurements as if they were rafters on ...


1

That pergola was built a few years ago by Jason Roberson of Charlottesville, VA. I'd write to him and ask how it is holding up and what he might do differently. https://builderbeast.com/new-construction/decks-and-built-ins/ One of the photos shows that the top joint was pinned laterally. See: Note that the exifdata in most of the images date the ...


1

This is highly dubious since you mention snow. The current garage sidewall is not high enough to support the high side of a shed roof over your proposed additional space, and the additional roof (if you just slap it on there anyway) will introduce additional snow-loading to the garage roof that it's probably not designed for. You can get some massive snow ...


1

Yes, you can do this. But it will be out of code (probably). Build footors on the ground by building forms out of wood, like 2 x 2 (feet) or 3x3 (feet again). Fill that with concrete (and some mashed up chicken wire for strength). It's take more bags than you think. Then buy the concrete 4x4 footers to sit on top of them. (or bag the home-built footers ...


1

Either you dig to set metal post anchors or you dig to set the post's. Also, since your in a climate that has freezing weather, if you want to build by Code, you'll need to dig your holes 48" to avoid ground heave from frozen soil. So the only real decision than is what is more secure: metal anchors or posts set in concrete? Post's will give the greatest ...


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