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Thanks for the responses. Turned out well enough (the worst part is the wallpaper that is a different color now). I used the flush cut saw to remove the front piece to see what i was dealing with. The shelf was in a groove. Cut the shelf in two with a circular saw. One side came out with a hard pull. The other had 3 screws in so I had to pry it out with a ...


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You can not remove this shelf without damage In fact, the shelf itself would need to be destroyed to not damaged the supporting edge pieces. Even then, there will be a 'scar' where the shelf was attached. To remove it, I suggest cutting a section out of the middle of the shelf about 1 to 2 inches wide to split the shelf into two pieces to create room to ...


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Hard to tell how it's attached without taking it apart. It can't be just glue, so there must be something else. Could be dowels. Could be screws (in which case, the heads might be visible on the other side of the upright, where the piano book is sitting) That shelf is a permanent part of the house, it wasn't built to be removable. It's going to be really ...


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All the other answers that are currently here are good and correct, but I just wanted to share a "cheat" for making a mitered corner look a little neater sometimes. Not sure how useful it will be for the materials you're using, but it might be useful for someone else in a similar problem. YMMV but it has saved my butt a couple of times. Once you assemble ...


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If the fence of the saw is acurate, and the angle of cut is good, the trick I use to joint angled pieces together as you need there is to make a masking tape hinge. First I use 2" blue tape and apply it lengthwise the filler along the cut miter, letting half the tape lay off the filler to receive the other filler. Before setting the other filler in place, ...


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this is called a knee brace You mean the span not the bearing width. Assuming the brace to be fully effective, the effective span is less than the span between the knee braces. The reason is too complected to explain in detail here. For design, you could be conservative and just use the distance between the braces I usually suggest lag screws. The screws ...


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I would agree with Isherwood and they can be tough. looking at the 2 pieces the angle of the blade is slightly off causing the difference in size. The gauges on most home owner type table saws is a ball park, use a triangle square to set your blade angle not a small one one close to the size of your blade. Carbide tips use a spacer at the bottom and you can ...


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Miters like that are extremely challenging without automated equipment, which is why they're rarely done. I've attempted them with cedar siding corners and a few other projects and have mostly given up on that whole strategy. Normally you'd either: Use a simple lap joint with the seam oriented to the less conspicuous direction Use a rabbeted lap joint (to ...


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Beauty has nothing to do with it. It's all about function. That example is very thin for a real Butcher Block (so it's not, IMHO), which often approximate a cube, and are intended to take some serious use in the process of meatcutting. They may be 12-18 inches thick. They are massive. That thin slab could be made somewhat functional by putting it on a ...


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"I had so far gathered that for a block to be called a "butcher block," the grain must be perpendicular to the surface". It refers to both end grain and edge grain. The ones for butchering or chopping typically are end grain and are more forgiving or self-healing, they will not show blade marks as readily or be as damaged by the knife/cleaver blade. ...


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Will it sag? Yes. Everything 'sags', there is no rigid material A more on point question is then how much will it sag? Or, even more on point, will it sag more that I am ok with? How much is sags is dependent on the dimensions of the material, physical properties of the material, at distance between the supports and the weight applied to it. For a given ...


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There is a cool website that calculates sag based on a variety of inputs. https://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/ It also naturally depends upon where you attach the legs. If they were set in from the ends a fair bit, that would go a long way in preventing sag.


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I'm not sure how you're going to be able to do that with this hinge. There are a few tactical issues. First, the hinge requires a mortise which would typically be on the inside of the door. So now you'll have to figure out how to cut the mortise on the inside of the cabinet frame. Second, The hinge is a 110 degree hinge but it's meant to swing in the ...


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There are many ways to do this and which of them to choose depends on many things including what tools are available and the skill of the person using the tools. Back when I was a carpenter I would choose to use a reciprocating saw but this takes a decent level of skill to use to both get a good cut and also not hurt yourself. Upside, will cut through nails....


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What you're looking for are called 'Quick-Connect Fittings' and come in many different types and configurations. Here is an example.


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