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Get stick-on mylar mirror sheets. You won't have to trim the shelves and you'll avoid having the heavy weight of a glass mirror swinging back and forth on those hinges. Those cabinets are not built for that.


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You'll have to remove the shelves and have the and have the edges cut to make room for the mirror. There's a possibility that the actual hinges and opener could be adjusted to allow for the additional space. The mirror could be assembled using mirror tiles from your home store and heavy duty double sided tape. As a last resort, you could mount a mirror on ...


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You need to cut the back of each shelf the mirror will touch. As it isn't exposed cutting the MDF shouldn't effect the look. You will also need to buy a pretty light weight and thin mirror and just glue it (adhesive caulk) it to the door.


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You need to identify which door goes in which opening. If they're newer "pre-hung" doors of the same brand, then the doors should all be exactly the same size and the hinges will have been installed at the factory into precut mortises that are spaced exactly the same distance from the top & bottom of the doors. There's a chance that different ...


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screw a fillet piece to the end of the boards the result will be much stronger than trying to cut the board to fit in the post, and will look better.


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The end cut is easy on the compound miter saw. For the notch, my first thought was a router on an angled sled as Greg Hill suggested. However, thinking about it some more, I'd suggest a dado blade in the (borrowed) table saw. Use a crosscut sled to hold the fence rail (loads of examples on YouTube about building and using crosscut sleds, from simple to ...


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I’d install 2x4’s horizontally at about 24” on center to the exterior side of the posts. (The bottom horizontal 2x4 should be pressure treated.) Then I’d install a cheap wall sheathing (if required for seismic active area or high wind area.) If not required, then install a moisture barrier directly to the 2x4’s. The reason we install a moisture barrier is ...


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I see no reason you could not use treated lumber, it appears to me to be the simplest solution. It would probably blend better than any other type of material.


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If you really do need to saw off the legs, here a few more ideas that are similar to JACK's answer. Hanger Bolts Use these to reattach the legs and have them removable for when you move out. These are half lag screw and half bolt. The lag screw side gets screwed into wood on one side of the connection (usually with a pilot hole drilled first to prevent ...


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You mentioned this this was "expensive". It's going to lose a lot of its value once you start modifying it, so you have to take that into consideration when considering cost. As others have mentioned, there will likely be unavoidable side effects like a visible seam or reduced structural integrity. What you're asking to do is possible, but it's ...


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