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Understand the constraints of the existing framing. I'd have probably kept the new vertical 2x4 you added 3.5" shorter (along with the plywood spacer you added), and made the header stick out 3.5" on that side to rest on top of that new 2x4. You'd essentially be using the existing vertical 2x4 as the king stud and your new 2x4 as the jack stud, ...


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That looks like regular dried-up old glazing putty. If it was me I would soften it using a heat gun while scraping it with a putty knife or similar tool. Then I would rig a guide on my router and remove all remaining putty (and maybe a thin bit of the wood) with the router. I might use a paintbrush to soak it with mineral spirits prior to routing, to reduce ...


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What you described contains both carpentry work (building a fence) and wood work (building workbench etc) so depending on what you ultimately want, the resources could be a bit different. Here are some good recommendation that I find beginner-friendly. General home improvement: HomeDepot/Lowes has youtube channel and DIY tutorials in their website that ...


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There's a video series that fine homebuilding put out on Youtube called Framing (Floors and Stairs, Walls, and a Roof) with Larry Haun (there are three). This is from 1992 but the information holds up! As always, the code probably has changed since then but I found the videos very informative.


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Working carpenter; I live with this on a regular basis. You need long (3") screws in the top hinge. One is adequate, two would be better. That's it. Try to use the holes further away from the hinge barrel. The underlying reason for this is that the people that hung your door left the short screws in place. (Prehung doors are shipped like this because ...


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This is somewhat disturbing. A heavy door could be considered to be well constructed and as such, would not change geometry. That leaves the door frame, ostensibly attached to the wall and to the house. It's not impossible to consider that your house has shifted. Our outside garage wall grew cracks during a period of alternating dry and wet seasons, which ...


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You have a couple options, but only one will make it look truly right without creating an oddly-shaped fascia or a ski jump in your roof. You'll need to raise the rafter tails. They're likely low in the middle because either the wall is sagging or the rafters weren't cut or fit well to begin with. I would examine how the rafters are fastened to the wall ...


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