Hot answers tagged

26

Don‘t tear the wires out Some newer doorbells are going wireless. But this is not a universal trend. Better doorbells are actually wired, because they do things that take power. They are lighted (like, the button glows), they have cameras or WiFi, motion sensors, microphones, speakers, etc. Those things are not possible on battery. Also, the ...


20

Looks like a standard install. You can only run so many wires in a hole without de-rating the circuit capacity. The holes are set back at least 3/4" from the stud surface, add 1/2" for drywall and you get 1 1/4" the length of the drywall screws. Even if the drywall screw goes into the same line as the hole it isn't long enough to penetrate the wire. If ...


10

Those wires going to your doorbell button hook up to a transformer somewhere. Maybe it's behind your chime, or maybe its in the attic, but it's there somewhere. Find the transformer and completely disconnect it (but leave it there in case anyone wants to hook it up again), and then you can bury the doorbell wires in the wall. Again, try to make the wires ...


7

The answer is yes you can have 2 separate circuits in the same box (they can have a splice also but not needed in your case). The only concern would be the total box fill. Based on the NEC the wire fill would be calculated at 2.0 for each conductor for 14 gauge wire and 2.25 for 12 gauge wire. The device or switch counts as 2X for the largest wire connected ...


5

There are "wireless" doorbells that can actually take power from the low voltage doorbell wiring, though you may need to adjust the wiring to make it a power delivery circuit instead of a "short-circuit to ring" circuit. These have the advantage that you don't have to worry about charging the battery every so often.


3

A long shot, but maybe: Hot wire broke Instead of fixing it, someone swapped hot & neutral elsewhere and then for the neutral (not hot since they were swapped earlier in the chain) tied it to ground (which to a simple tester will look the same) Latest electrician tried to fix the problem for you but due to the broken hot, couldn't easily fix it, and due ...


2

The conduit's fine...but that ground wire sure isn't While a properly installed conduit system provides quite solid grounding performance, the pigtail from the receptacle isn't what I'd call an acceptable level of workmanship by any stretch of the imagination. I would get a proper 10-32 grounding screw and use it to attach the pigtail to the ground hole in ...


2

In the conduit wiring system, a too-short wire probably means it's been pulled into the other box. Just pull it back. If it's too short to have a presentable length in both boxes, the wire is done for. Hook a new wire to it, and use the old wire to pull its replacement wire.


2

You can divide this problem into 2 aspects: First, protecting the lumber integrity when running wires. Second, protecting the electrical wires from damage. For load bearing studs (there are less stringent standards for non-load bearing), here are the key (U.S. - you can extrapolate for Canada) requirements for 2x4 studs under 10 feet in length: LUMBER ...


2

To power the wired doorbell, there will be a transformer that converts the house voltage to a lower voltage. To decomission the wiring you'll have to find that transformer and remove it. The other option would be to cap them off and leave them inside the box of the new doorbell. That lets you or a future homeowner use them in the future.


2

You would not normally wire two heaters that are rated for 240VAC operation in series on a 240VAC power source. Instead they would be connected in parallel along a daisy chain of wiring like shown here. Note that the below does not depict the safety ground wire connections.


2

The cables are in sequence. The wires are in parallel. The cable will have ground and two hot wires, we'll call them black and red. The "red" wire may be the white wire taped red, or even taped black. Doesn't matter which. Red and black come from the panel, stop at heater 1, and continue to heater 2. At heater 2, they terminate with red and black ...


2

There is, of course, no problem with putting a larger box into the wall so that you have more room for all the wires and nuts you plan to put inside. There might be a problem with the presentation of the finished work. You wouldn't want to put a double gang faceplate on your wall when you only have one switch. The solution is to use what's called a ...


2

Contact the manufacturer. These things are not listed for unit repair using random hardware store parts. Expect Hydro to disapprove any funny looking repairs. That is not simply a lever. There's a mechanism in there, that is important to the ability to "break" high current flows. Do not attempt any repair without consulting with the manufacturer. If ...


1

You do have good reason to be concerned. But what I see is not warping. The siding where you see gaps at the bottom edge are where the siding is no longer held in place at the bottom. The siding is to be nailed only at the top so the next course above covers the nails that hold it in place. The bottom is held in place by locking into the top of the lower ...


1

I think Canexel is something that's only available in Canada, so I cannot speak to the siding itself. Also (being from the states) I don't know much about the process of purchasing a home up there either. But here's what I would do if I were buying this home. It looks to me like the siding was laid over furring strips, and the installer probably cheaped out ...


1

Since it appears that the flooring will be going down in the summer months when the humidity is at its highest levels, will be the best time to install since the floor will shrink from there when the heating season starts. You will need no expansion gaps in the run of the floor. The only gap needed will be at the perimeter of all walls, about a 1/2" will ...


1

Loads are generally connected in parallel across the 240 Volt mains. The 1500 Watt heater draws 1500/240 = 6.25 Amps and the 2000 Watt heater draws 2000/240 = 8.33 Amps. Together these loads draw 6.25 + 8.33 = 14.58 Amps, which can safely be serviced by a 20 Amp breaker and 12/2 wiring, provided nothing else is connected to this branch circuit. Each heater ...


1

Nope NEC 210.23(C) limits 40A and 50A multioutlet branch circuits in dwelling units to powering fastened in place (i.e. built-in) cooking appliances, not freestanding ones. (A regular range circuit only has a single outlet, so it is governed by NEC 210.22 instead.) Your 40A branch circuit could power either range, though, as a 13kW nameplate range comes ...


1

You are entitled to do the minimum that satisfies the code, and what the prospective buyers will accept. Contact the local code enforcement. It looks to me like the copper line could be gently and carefully bent away from the sharp edge and some sort of collar placed around it or grommet inserted into the sheet metal hole. EDIT Soft copper tubing allowed in ...


1

For me, there is nothing wrong with the copper tubing used as long as it is not touching the sharp metal of the hole. For someone that is looking for anything to complain about, well it is time to correct the problem. You can "GOOGLE" CPVC bulkhead fittings or go to the web site (PVC pipe supplies .com ) and click on the picture with the same heading for a ...


1

In Ontario, Rogers spent years running their coaxial cables through duct work. The only downside was that the heat caused the wires to wear more quickly. I don't have access to codes here, but if Rogers did it then it's probably allowed. Ethernet cables aren't shielded as well and would suffer the heat more. Maybe run them through the cold air return? As ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible