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35

I make a template with a piece of paper or cardboard (like the box the item came in). This makes drilling holes in a precise pattern a bit easier. In some situations, you might transfer the pattern from your paper onto the wall using pencil / marker / spray-paint. For the size mirror you're talking about, you might want to read about another mounting ...


32

Use a 70 foot water level. Here is a diagram of one. Use 1/4 inch tubing or slightly larger. Fill tubing with water before submerging one end. The container of water is required because a huge difference in water level at the stick end, translates to a tiny difference in the water level at the container. That keeps the actual water level almost the same, no ...


14

A traditional way of attaching hanging objects to masonry was to drill a hole, bang in a wooden dowel, and then fasten into the dowel with a screw or nail. In your case this could help reduce the accuracy needed in the holes in the brick. I find drilling accurate masonry holes challenging because the base material is often of varied composition and that ...


13

One way is by looking at the bond of the bricks. Your bricks are arranged in a running bond or stretcher bond, which is always one brick thick: To be a structural brick wall it would have to be more than one brick thick, or have multiple wythes, and you would see headers, like this: It's likely your walls are wood-framed with single-wythe brick veneer on ...


13

Stakes. Place stakes in the bottom of the trench. Put them up against the edge to leave room next to them for bricks. They will stick up out of the trench. Run a string along the stakes corresponding to the top of your wall. Move the string until it is straight using a level or laser sight. When you are done you will have a string corresponding with the ...


13

Hacksaw? If you saw thru the rusty plate (twice, one for left slot and one for right) and remove it by pulling it out from under the screw, the remaining screw will be sticking up enough for you to get hold of the whole head with a pliers and unscrew it. It is hard to argue w Alaska Man (or you) re merits of replacing the whole box. But it seems like you ...


11

The white powdery substance is called efflorescence. It's bascially mineral salts leaching out of the masonry. The efflorescence itself may not be anything more than a cosmetic problem, however the appearance of efflorescence indicates that there's moisture present in the masonry. This is not entirely surprising--you're talking about an old brick wall ...


11

For brick driveways the most important part is a solid compacted base--crushed quarry rock or shale, not crushed river rock. Sand is normally used, not mortar. For a “green” drive, place the holes vertical and fill with dirt and then grass seed. I have done this and if kept moist with drought resistant grass it works well (but I live in the grass dead ...


11

I believe that they are concrete sleeve anchors, something like these†. When you screw the nut on and tighten it down, it pulls the anchor in and tightens the expanding sleeve against the hole. With no nut, there's nothing threaded down in the hole so the threaded rod just spins. I don't think you can pull those out, as the end in the wall is bigger than the ...


10

It is a bad idea. TV screens are designed to be viewed basically level from your eyes as you sit in your TV room. If you mount it above the mantel you will forever looking up to see the thing. The heat thing is also a concern for electronics as you have mentioned. Raise the temperature some and in the best case you will age certain components and shorten ...


10

A video mentioned in another answer shows three methods: a string line-level, a laser level, and a water level. These will all work, but I think you'll get your best results with a water level. Laser levels are expensive, they're super expensive if you need good accuracy and something that can be used at decent distances outdoors. In my experience they're ...


9

Even 'half bricks' up 15' vertical is going to be a massive amount of weight that may require additional support underneath. In addition, splitting bricks in half is no easy task. You're going to end up paying a whole lot in labor to do that. Instead, you'd want to use a brick veneer. Which is 'real' brick but very thin: They go on essentially like you ...


8

Bricks will easily withstand the weight of the TV. What you may need to worry about is the floor withstanding the weight of 2 feet of bricks under the TV. Since you don't mention the size of the base, it's difficult to know exactly how much weight we are talking about, but a 2 foot stack of bricks is a considerable load. Brick weighs roughly 120 lbs per ...


8

The frame is of wood. The brick is a cladding on the outside. It is not a veneer. A veneer is fake layer of thin brick-like parquets that are secured with a cement or glue to a backing of some kind. In other words a stone or brick veneer does not have full-sized bricks. Your house does have full-size bricks, but they are not used for structural purposes. It ...


8

I would take a 4-1/2" angle grinder with a diamond wheel and cut out the mortar between the bricks down level with the patio surface, at like 5-10 brick intervals, creating a path for the water to flow out. Then re-caulk the joint tapering the caulk at each "drain".


8

A standard brick is 8" x 2.25" x 3.5". Ignore the 3.5" as that's how thick the wall will be. 8" * 2.25" is 18 sq. in. A square foot is 144 sq. in. (12 * 12). 144 sq. in. divided by 18 sq. in. is 8. But I left out the mortar. It's possible that the mortar on six bricks is equal to about two bricks. Another way of looking at this is that each brick is ...


8

I am going to say they can... but no. There are tons of varieties of bricks that are used for pavers. There is no reason to go with your garden variety house brick. To be clear the OP is talking about something very similar to below - clay cored brick. Take a good look at this brick - as this is a pretty smooth example. Do you want to walk on ...


8

WD-40 is NOT a good penetrating oil. Liquid Wrench is better, but still not that great. The best kinds are called Kroil or PB Blaster, you can find them in auto parts stores. But if you don't have an auto parts store nearby, wintergreen oil can be bought at many drug stores and is much much better than WD-40 or Liquid Wrench. With a good penetrating oil you ...


7

Get a reputable professional structural engineer in there ASAP -- it looks like the wall is severely cracked and would fail at that point when subject to shear loads. I'm sure that the eyeballs of said engineer will tell a story when he sees a wall that's cracked that badly. Also, WHO THE HELL BUILDS WALLS ATOP LOOSE EARTH?


7

This Old House has a great video showing you how to set level lines for landscaping projects. I think this is exactly what you're looking for. Video is about six minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuK5d7zNRZw They show three methods, also described below; but I highly recommend watching the video as their explanations & demonstration on a ...


6

There may be a brick that has that shape already, but I have not seen any. If there were, they would be custom ordered. To match your brick you have in place would even be a taller order. Bricks made in one time of year under the same name will differ in color and texture to a degree from brick of the same name from the same company, just made at a different ...


6

Your question about getting a wall exactly level is presumably intended to prevent overtopping at any one location. In fact, overtopping at one location is preferable so that you can respond to the spill. For example, overtopping water is likely to erode the base of the wall, so in having the spill where you want it, you can mitigate the spilling flow ...


5

You can patch it with hydraulic cement similar to this type You need to carefully remove all loose material and clean the area. The cement is fast setting and expands slightly as it sets, making a tight seal. Only mix as much as you can use in a few minutes.


5

It is efflorescence. Water picks up minerals in the mortar and transports them until the water evaporates, leaving the minerals behind. Other than cosmetic issues, this is normally harmless, though if the process continues for a long period, enough minerals can be removed that the mortar sort of rots. Only close inspection will indicate if the mortar is ...


5

An arch (if engineered correctly) is self supporting. No need for a lintel at all. From the looks of it, that arch is more than adequate to hold the brick above so I'd say that wooden piece is merely a filler--not a structural element.


5

Open a window and measure from the face of the brick to the inside wall. If it's 14 plus inches, that's at least two courses of brick. It will be obvious if it is; questionable if it's any less thick than that. One brick (4") and a 2x4 stud wall = ~8" Two bricks and a stud = ~12" Add 1" if it's lath and plaster; add 1/2" for drywall. Allow another 1/2" ...


5

Cutting a hole in your foundation almost always requires an engineer, and is almost never a do-it-yourself project. You'll need an engineer, to tell you how to carry the load around the opening. And you'll likely need tools and knowledge you don't have, to actually cut the hole.


5

Two issues - cable and port. Cable through brick wall If one end is on one side of a brick wall and the other end is on the other side of the brick wall, drill a hole with a hammer drill and a masonry bit and fish the wire through. A brick wall could be just a couple of layers of brick but often has cinderblock or (as I found when I replaced my oven years ...


5

I assisted with a project like this. Pavers usually have a chamfered edge which is a little easier on bare feet than the sharper corners and edges of bricks but they worked fine. The sand is a really good idea though. In addition to stabilizing the bricks, it will reduce the weed growth between them which means you'll have more time to enjoy the patio.


5

It may not be desired, but sometimes it's the only available wall space in the room. FYI, we mounted our 55" above the fireplace. But the fireplace was converted to propane at the same time. I was able to attach it to some paneling that was used to build the fireplace surround, after appropriate reinforcing. Here's a picture of it completed. Note that ...


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