Hot answers tagged

13

One way is by looking at the bond of the bricks. Your bricks are arranged in a running bond or stretcher bond, which is always one brick thick: To be a structural brick wall it would have to be more than one brick thick, or have multiple wythes, and you would see headers, like this: It's likely your walls are wood-framed with single-wythe brick veneer on ...


12

While this will not directly answer your question, I'd like to offer an alternative solution. Modify Existing Molding If it were me. I'd get some transition molding, with a profile like this. I'd then set up my table saw to rip the piece, to remove the angle profile on the back edge. Which would give me a profile like this. Once I had my molding ripped ...


11

I think you may have a problem brewing there. I have never heard of bricks being glued in a situation like this. Normally paving bricks will be set on a compacted base of stone dust and very fine packing gravel, then the joints are filled with fine mason sand. Mortar is rarely used, especially in cold climates as it will crack with any movement associated ...


11

I won’t say I'm an expert; I've worked with someone doing something similar in the past and may at least give you some guidance. Personally, I would use a concrete saw (larger blade than an angle grinder) and/or a chisel to cut the opening. Make sure you have help as you DO NOT want to drop the removed section(s). You can use these bricks later (see below). ...


11

The white powdery substance is called efflorescence. It's bascially mineral salts leaching out of the masonry. The efflorescence itself may not be anything more than a cosmetic problem, however the appearance of efflorescence indicates that there's moisture present in the masonry. This is not entirely surprising--you're talking about an old brick wall ...


10

Technically you could use some device for precision grinding like Dremel with some diamond bit with an extender to make it long enough, but that's almost mission impossible to do. First, you risk damaging the existing cable. Second, doing such job in a hard material when the hole is long and narrow will take too much time and precision to be worth it. You ...


9

Adding a brick facade to the lower front of your house may not be as easy as you may think. Your contractor may have issues with installing a footing to support the weight and proper backing to attach the brick ties, not to mention building out all the window and door jams to match the new depth. This could be a very expensive change. As far as adding ...


9

Even 'half bricks' up 15' vertical is going to be a massive amount of weight that may require additional support underneath. In addition, splitting bricks in half is no easy task. You're going to end up paying a whole lot in labor to do that. Instead, you'd want to use a brick veneer. Which is 'real' brick but very thin: They go on essentially like you ...


8

There's two ways off hand that I've used in the past -- knock it off with a chipping hammer, or grind it off using an angle grinder and disk. The chipping hammer is actually easiest because you don't spend time fighting the tool or securing the work piece. Have a stiff wire brush on hand to remove the final bits and pieces that the chipping hammer doesn't ...


8

If you don't have the proper structure under the area, you're not going to want to use full sized bricks for this project. Brick walls require proper concrete footings to support the massive amount of weight, if you don't have the ability to add the footings you won't be able to build a brick wall here. In situations like this, veneer will likely be your ...


8

The frame is of wood. The brick is a cladding on the outside. It is not a veneer. A veneer is fake layer of thin brick-like parquets that are secured with a cement or glue to a backing of some kind. In other words a stone or brick veneer does not have full-sized bricks. Your house does have full-size bricks, but they are not used for structural purposes. It ...


8

I would take a 4-1/2" angle grinder with a diamond wheel and cut out the mortar between the bricks down level with the patio surface, at like 5-10 brick intervals, creating a path for the water to flow out. Then re-caulk the joint tapering the caulk at each "drain".


8

A standard brick is 8" x 2.25" x 3.5". Ignore the 3.5" as that's how thick the wall will be. 8" * 2.25" is 18 sq. in. A square foot is 144 sq. in. (12 * 12). 144 sq. in. divided by 18 sq. in. is 8. But I left out the mortar. It's possible that the mortar on six bricks is equal to about two bricks. Another way of looking at this is that each brick is ...


7

Not at all. If it's real brick. If it's a veneer, that's different.


7

I did this exact thing a few years ago in a friend's house. The steps I took: Remove lime efflorescence from the brick by spraying on some diluted white vinegar, then scrubbing with a stiff-bristled nylon brush. Leave to dry. Prime and seal (there were some smoke stains on the brick) the fireplace with Kilz latex spray primer. Leave to dry. Paint with ...


7

Get a reputable professional structural engineer in there ASAP -- it looks like the wall is severely cracked and would fail at that point when subject to shear loads. I'm sure that the eyeballs of said engineer will tell a story when he sees a wall that's cracked that badly. Also, WHO THE HELL BUILDS WALLS ATOP LOOSE EARTH?


6

As the comment said, a heat gun may make scraping this off much easier. First, try scraping some off without a heat gun. You might get lucky and it might "break" off the surface in large solid pieces. If it does, the heat gun might make it more difficult. If it does not come off easily, then I'd try the heat gun. Start a low temperature and work your way ...


6

I don't think it is much of an issue with individual materials. In general most of them last a long time, and when they do fail, they simply get replaced. Of course, it can be a problem if the item that is failing cannot easily be replaced. Off the top of my head I think the only issue could be the foundation. Many homes built that long ago did not ...


6

What's worked for me in the past (though this was with brick shape rather than style) was to e-mail photos to some reclamation yards. It might not yield results - after all some yards have 10,000's of bricks on site, but you might get a name for the style of brick or a further contact who might be able to help.


6

In the aeronautical industry, we have this saying "If it looks ugly, it flies ugly" which has proven out in that aerodynamic design needs certain sleek lines and cobbled together garbage just doesn't have what it takes. Same goes for the building industry. Despite the cosmetics of Stucco and the willingness to absolve the builder because it "doesn't look ...


6

Rick, that is an impossible question to answer with the info you have supplied. The condition may be bad, but you need to access or have accessed the structural integrity of the shell. This doesn't sound like it's gonna be a DIY project, so my advise is to get some professional evaluation and a few quotes for a restoration and the demolition. Once you know ...


6

There may be a brick that has that shape already, but I have not seen any. If there were, they would be custom ordered. To match your brick you have in place would even be a taller order. Bricks made in one time of year under the same name will differ in color and texture to a degree from brick of the same name from the same company, just made at a different ...


5

Finally found an obscure article that confirmed my calculation is correct. The Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU) defines the various sizes of blocks used in US construction. They are each given a nominal size but the actual size is slightly smaller and accounts for 3/8" mortar joints. So when building lets say a retaining wall out of 16x8x8" "cinder" blocks your ...


5

You can patch it with hydraulic cement similar to this type You need to carefully remove all loose material and clean the area. The cement is fast setting and expands slightly as it sets, making a tight seal. Only mix as much as you can use in a few minutes.


5

It is efflorescence. Water picks up minerals in the mortar and transports them until the water evaporates, leaving the minerals behind. Other than cosmetic issues, this is normally harmless, though if the process continues for a long period, enough minerals can be removed that the mortar sort of rots. Only close inspection will indicate if the mortar is ...


5

An arch (if engineered correctly) is self supporting. No need for a lintel at all. From the looks of it, that arch is more than adequate to hold the brick above so I'd say that wooden piece is merely a filler--not a structural element.


5

Bricks will easily withstand the weight of the TV. What you may need to worry about is the floor withstanding the weight of 2 feet of bricks under the TV. Since you don't mention the size of the base, it's difficult to know exactly how much weight we are talking about, but a 2 foot stack of bricks is a considerable load. Brick weighs roughly 120 lbs per ...


5

Open a window and measure from the face of the brick to the inside wall. If it's 14 plus inches, that's at least two courses of brick. It will be obvious if it is; questionable if it's any less thick than that. One brick (4") and a 2x4 stud wall = ~8" Two bricks and a stud = ~12" Add 1" if it's lath and plaster; add 1/2" for drywall. Allow another 1/2" ...


5

Cutting a hole in your foundation almost always requires an engineer, and is almost never a do-it-yourself project. You'll need an engineer, to tell you how to carry the load around the opening. And you'll likely need tools and knowledge you don't have, to actually cut the hole.


4

You might consider soda blasting. It's like sand blasting but uses industrial baking soda. One of the suggested uses is for removing graffiti from brick.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible