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13

One way is by looking at the bond of the bricks. Your bricks are arranged in a running bond or stretcher bond, which is always one brick thick: To be a structural brick wall it would have to be more than one brick thick, or have multiple wythes, and you would see headers, like this: It's likely your walls are wood-framed with single-wythe brick veneer on ...


12

While this will not directly answer your question, I'd like to offer an alternative solution. Modify Existing Molding If it were me. I'd get some transition molding, with a profile like this. I'd then set up my table saw to rip the piece, to remove the angle profile on the back edge. Which would give me a profile like this. Once I had my molding ripped to ...


11

The white powdery substance is called efflorescence. It's bascially mineral salts leaching out of the masonry. The efflorescence itself may not be anything more than a cosmetic problem, however the appearance of efflorescence indicates that there's moisture present in the masonry. This is not entirely surprising--you're talking about an old brick wall ...


11

For brick driveways the most important part is a solid compacted base--crushed quarry rock or shale, not crushed river rock. Sand is normally used, not mortar. For a “green” drive, place the holes vertical and fill with dirt and then grass seed. I have done this and if kept moist with drought resistant grass it works well (but I live in the grass dead ...


10

It is a bad idea. TV screens are designed to be viewed basically level from your eyes as you sit in your TV room. If you mount it above the mantel you will forever looking up to see the thing. The heat thing is also a concern for electronics as you have mentioned. Raise the temperature some and in the best case you will age certain components and shorten ...


9

Even 'half bricks' up 15' vertical is going to be a massive amount of weight that may require additional support underneath. In addition, splitting bricks in half is no easy task. You're going to end up paying a whole lot in labor to do that. Instead, you'd want to use a brick veneer. Which is 'real' brick but very thin: They go on essentially like you ...


8

If you don't have the proper structure under the area, you're not going to want to use full sized bricks for this project. Brick walls require proper concrete footings to support the massive amount of weight, if you don't have the ability to add the footings you won't be able to build a brick wall here. In situations like this, veneer will likely be your ...


8

Bricks will easily withstand the weight of the TV. What you may need to worry about is the floor withstanding the weight of 2 feet of bricks under the TV. Since you don't mention the size of the base, it's difficult to know exactly how much weight we are talking about, but a 2 foot stack of bricks is a considerable load. Brick weighs roughly 120 lbs per ...


8

The frame is of wood. The brick is a cladding on the outside. It is not a veneer. A veneer is fake layer of thin brick-like parquets that are secured with a cement or glue to a backing of some kind. In other words a stone or brick veneer does not have full-sized bricks. Your house does have full-size bricks, but they are not used for structural purposes. It ...


8

I would take a 4-1/2" angle grinder with a diamond wheel and cut out the mortar between the bricks down level with the patio surface, at like 5-10 brick intervals, creating a path for the water to flow out. Then re-caulk the joint tapering the caulk at each "drain".


8

A standard brick is 8" x 2.25" x 3.5". Ignore the 3.5" as that's how thick the wall will be. 8" * 2.25" is 18 sq. in. A square foot is 144 sq. in. (12 * 12). 144 sq. in. divided by 18 sq. in. is 8. But I left out the mortar. It's possible that the mortar on six bricks is equal to about two bricks. Another way of looking at this is that each brick is ...


8

I am going to say they can... but no. There are tons of varieties of bricks that are used for pavers. There is no reason to go with your garden variety house brick. To be clear the OP is talking about something very similar to below - clay cored brick. Take a good look at this brick - as this is a pretty smooth example. Do you want to walk on ...


7

I did this exact thing a few years ago in a friend's house. The steps I took: Remove lime efflorescence from the brick by spraying on some diluted white vinegar, then scrubbing with a stiff-bristled nylon brush. Leave to dry. Prime and seal (there were some smoke stains on the brick) the fireplace with Kilz latex spray primer. Leave to dry. Paint with ...


7

Get a reputable professional structural engineer in there ASAP -- it looks like the wall is severely cracked and would fail at that point when subject to shear loads. I'm sure that the eyeballs of said engineer will tell a story when he sees a wall that's cracked that badly. Also, WHO THE HELL BUILDS WALLS ATOP LOOSE EARTH?


6

Rick, that is an impossible question to answer with the info you have supplied. The condition may be bad, but you need to access or have accessed the structural integrity of the shell. This doesn't sound like it's gonna be a DIY project, so my advise is to get some professional evaluation and a few quotes for a restoration and the demolition. Once you know ...


6

In the aeronautical industry, we have this saying "If it looks ugly, it flies ugly" which has proven out in that aerodynamic design needs certain sleek lines and cobbled together garbage just doesn't have what it takes. Same goes for the building industry. Despite the cosmetics of Stucco and the willingness to absolve the builder because it "doesn't look ...


6

There may be a brick that has that shape already, but I have not seen any. If there were, they would be custom ordered. To match your brick you have in place would even be a taller order. Bricks made in one time of year under the same name will differ in color and texture to a degree from brick of the same name from the same company, just made at a different ...


5

Finally found an obscure article that confirmed my calculation is correct. The Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU) defines the various sizes of blocks used in US construction. They are each given a nominal size but the actual size is slightly smaller and accounts for 3/8" mortar joints. So when building lets say a retaining wall out of 16x8x8" "cinder" blocks your ...


5

You can patch it with hydraulic cement similar to this type You need to carefully remove all loose material and clean the area. The cement is fast setting and expands slightly as it sets, making a tight seal. Only mix as much as you can use in a few minutes.


5

It is efflorescence. Water picks up minerals in the mortar and transports them until the water evaporates, leaving the minerals behind. Other than cosmetic issues, this is normally harmless, though if the process continues for a long period, enough minerals can be removed that the mortar sort of rots. Only close inspection will indicate if the mortar is ...


5

An arch (if engineered correctly) is self supporting. No need for a lintel at all. From the looks of it, that arch is more than adequate to hold the brick above so I'd say that wooden piece is merely a filler--not a structural element.


5

Open a window and measure from the face of the brick to the inside wall. If it's 14 plus inches, that's at least two courses of brick. It will be obvious if it is; questionable if it's any less thick than that. One brick (4") and a 2x4 stud wall = ~8" Two bricks and a stud = ~12" Add 1" if it's lath and plaster; add 1/2" for drywall. Allow another 1/2" ...


5

Cutting a hole in your foundation almost always requires an engineer, and is almost never a do-it-yourself project. You'll need an engineer, to tell you how to carry the load around the opening. And you'll likely need tools and knowledge you don't have, to actually cut the hole.


5

Two issues - cable and port. Cable through brick wall If one end is on one side of a brick wall and the other end is on the other side of the brick wall, drill a hole with a hammer drill and a masonry bit and fish the wire through. A brick wall could be just a couple of layers of brick but often has cinderblock or (as I found when I replaced my oven years ...


5

I assisted with a project like this. Pavers usually have a chamfered edge which is a little easier on bare feet than the sharper corners and edges of bricks but they worked fine. The sand is a really good idea though. In addition to stabilizing the bricks, it will reduce the weed growth between them which means you'll have more time to enjoy the patio.


5

It may not be desired, but sometimes it's the only available wall space in the room. FYI, we mounted our 55" above the fireplace. But the fireplace was converted to propane at the same time. I was able to attach it to some paneling that was used to build the fireplace surround, after appropriate reinforcing. Here's a picture of it completed. Note that ...


5

I would rent an "undercut saw" and put a diamond blade in it. Cut a channel along the floor at a suitable height. Brick cuts fairly easily and you'll have a dead-straight, perfect fit to your floor. Here's a video You'll have to do a little creative grinding with other tools near the wall where the circular saw won't reach. You can get diamond-grit ...


4

To clarify, this staircase is entirely brick, correct? If so, you absolutely don't want to use concrete. Concrete is harder than the brick and will eventually damage the bricks. You want to use mortar. If it's an older staircase, it's likely sanded mortar (mortar + sand).


4

If you want to fill a large gap with caulk, the first thing you do is fill the gap with a caulk "backer rod" that's made of foam. They come in various diameters are are typically found near the weather stripping in a home improvement store. You shove the backer in with a putty knife (not too deep, just enough to be below the surface), and then cover with ...


4

As you already know there is water getting into there, if you only seal up the inside to make it look better you will have water collecting between the door and your seal. You don't want a pool installed in your wall. To do this properly you really do need to excavate the outside remove the door and metal frame (if there is a steel load bearing piece ...


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