15

Put the leg that best matches your shelf width under the shelf. That is why there's different leg sizes. The bracket's critical section is the inner corner, it is equally strong in both directions. That said, usually the critical portion of the entire assembly is the withdrawal of the upper wall screw. Having the long leg against the wall somewhat reduces ...


10

Although you TV set may be light enough so that wall anchors will support the weight they may pull loose when the set gets re-positioned and adjusted. Always try to secure the mount to a framing member (stud). Most mounts are designed for this installation as they have openings spaced at 16 inches (the distance between each studs' center). A stud sensor is ...


8

Personally I've never had much luck with electronic stud finders. Other techniques that work for me: Use a magnet out of an old hard drive to locate nails/screws. Find one then search up and down for others. Hits in the top/bottom plate can be misleading. Wrap the magnet in some tape to help it slide over the wall without marking. I tried dangling the ...


6

The most obvious thing is to get a patch panel designed for a 19" rack or one that comes with an adapter plate. If you have your heart set on using the patch panel that you have then you would be faced with creating something of your own. I believe that the easiest way to do that is to purchase a ready made blank 19" rack panel that is higher than your ...


6

1 - Absolutely yes. Use a stud finder. 2 - No. 3 - Don't. A stud finder will help you again. Look vertically to see if you have an outlet directly below where you're drilling or above as that's an indication of a conduit as well.


5

I would refrain from using that type of fastener. I believe it will allow a lot of movement. I made a sketch to show what I have made before, many years ago. It does not have any hangers just angled notches that allow the legs to fit tightly and notches that act as a setting for the beam to bear on. A single bolt will draw it all together, or two could be ...


5

A cardboard or soft aluminium (from a drink can) shim sounds like an excellent solution to the problem. You want it just thick enough that the screws into the handrail cause the loop to grip tightly when they are done up.


5

They're called "custom-made brackets, specifically for this product". Otherwise known as "bespoke". You should be able to buy one of these from the company, dismantle it, and send a specimen to a metal fabrication shop, who will make as many as you please for you. Of course, by doing so you'd be violating their patents or design rights. If you can find a ...


5

Def. use a stud finder. I have something like this and it also alerts me to electrical cables. Like another poster said, just sheetrock is NOT strong enough to mount a TV to. You'll end up with a ripped up wall and a crashed TV at some point.


4

There is a 3/4" extender sold by Cooper Industries (and maybe others). They call it a cover. This site sells it and it probably can be found elsewhere online. You need to be sure that the box in the ceiling is firmly attached to the framing, preferably directly screwed into a joist. Fan rated boxes have heavier duty attachments for the fan hanger and use ...


4

The standard is 67" up to the top of a 1X4 ledger and 12" from drywall for single hanging. the centerline of the closet pole cup is typically is 2" from the top of the ledger, it can be lower, then the ledger needs to be wider to accommodate. That puts the shelf at 67 3/4" to the top. The 11 1/4" shelf will give the room needed to get the hanger on. This is ...


4

As far as I know, there is no "standard" for this. I've looked for them. The only standards have to do with the actual closet dimensions that are specified in building codes. A common convention is 12" from the back wall to the center of the rod. People typically put the closet rods in the middle of the closet. Minimum closet depth is 24" so that puts the ...


4

The long leg goes against the wall. You can do it the other way, but it won't be as strong.


4

A medium duty, standard single slot, blade bracket? Source: beta.lvmannequins.com Another option might be removing the plastic caps off the uprights and slide something down there; put 'legs' on the board and slip it in. Isn't that how some partitions with glass tops work?


4

If your box is that small it is almost certain that it is not a fan rated box. If it is not, then the box MUST be replaced with a fan rated box. Sorry, but even with approval, someone unlicensed, uninsured, and unqualified SHOULD NOT be doing electrical work in a place that they rent. This is a perfect example; something as "simple" as changing a ceiling ...


4

As you're just asking about which order to attach the pieces, and not different methods, there is very little difference. Mounting the brackets to the wall first may make it easier to ensure you hit studs, but you'll have to be careful to make them exactly level with each other. Attaching them to the desk first ensures they are level, but you'll need to ...


3

I think those are Simpson Strong-Tie HD3B, or maybe a HD5B. At under 10 bucks a pop, you can probably afford to buy one just to look at it and see if you think it suits your needs. edit: just looked at the fancy $100 ones, and I can see how you get way better attachment from them. I suggest you integrate a strap that ties the bracket to the underside of the ...


3

This looks like a bad piece of engineering design to use a slip finger bracket to mount a cantilever paper holder. This type of bracket would work pretty good for a towel bar that was mounted on both ends or possibly for a soap dish that was mounted right on center. I can suggest two possible courses of action that would solve the problem as long as the ...


3

There are no standard sizes. Braces of the type you are considering most commonly have holes that are less than 1/4" and more than 1/8", somewhere around 3/16". They are usually intended for #6, #8 or #10 screws. You could probably use 1/8" bolts, or maybe 3/16" depending on the brace. 1/4" bolts probably won't fit unless you ream out the holes. Which ...


3

The long part goes against the wall, under the shelf. The length of the actual bracket under the shelf should be three quarters the width of the shelf.


3

You need to acquire a light fixture mounting bracket. The type that you need would look like the bracket as shown in the picture below: Install it through the longer slotted holes into the existing electrical box holes. You can use the screws from the old light fixture. Due to the deep recess of the electrical box the bracket arm with the long slotted ...


3

Brackets of the type you want are made. Specifically designed for supporting wall mounted cupboards, white boards, panels etc. These were spotted in a UK web site for SPUR Shelving. You would have to check if the slot height and spacing on SPUR products matches those of the particular twin slot standards that you are considering.


3

An air conditioner can be installed on pretty much any brick, concrete or block wall. As long as it is installed properly, there is no issues to it falling or structural integrity of the building. Air conditioners are mounted on brackets all over the world, especially where space is a premium. You can always place rubber pads between the brackets and the ...


3

Whether the 2" side up or the 4" side up, it doesn't matter in terms of the stress on the bolt. We can do a simple analysis as below. In the figure below your T-shaped bracket in drawn in blue while the two bolts are drawn in red. For simplicity we assume that the bracket only contacts the wall via the two bolts at the very top and very bottom end. W is the ...


3

How about a "T Nut"? Drill a hole for the central threaded part, then knock it in so the teeth grip & hold.


3

After you figure out the spacing of the bolts hanging down, you thread a nut on the bolts on the side of the bracket opposite the heads. Cinch down the nuts, check the alignment. If okay, install the bracket and the bolts should stay put as you try to tighten the nut.


3

I have gone through this on about 20 installs and have gotten better from my first ones. The thicker the L-bracket the better. A lot of time the big box doesn't sell ones that are made for countertop jobs. This is something I usually order online because I get these cheaper and better quality. I am going to give you pointers based on you making these ...


3

As long as you don't heavily load the shelf you should be fine. Make sure that you hit the studs when you install the shelf brackets. The brackets should have a load rating on them. Use properly sized screws and balance the load across the shelf placing heavier items above or between the brackets. If you get some flex in the shelf at the center you can ...


3

The issues with shelves are sag and safety. Given 11" overhang and the bracket spacing you are at extremely (maybe none) low risk for sag. Two feet isn't really a wide enough space for a board to sag unless it is really thin. The 11" on each side, its nothing. The only issue there is tipping but that would be you adding a 40 pound anvil on the ...


2

10 inches (254 mm) to the center of the rod, minimum. The widest hangers I know about are 18.5", so half of that is 9.25" plus 3/4" wiggle room. Though some hanger rod brackets are ~12" (304.8 mm) to the center of the rod.


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