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1

Left hand drill bit and bolt extractor. The idea being you drill a hole in the center of your lag screw shaft, drilling in a counter clockwise direction which will avoid driving the shaft in deeper, once you have your hole in the shaft you use the extractor again in a counter clockwise direction which threads the extractor into the bolt shaft and the ...


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There's a lot of ways to remove it but from your prior post you seem to be set on re-using the hole so you'd really need to unscrew it. You "might" be able to cut a slot in it with the dremel and unscrew it with a screwdriver, being 3/8 that won't be a very strong slot and may snap off. If it was me I would remove enough of the drywall to be able to grab it ...


1

The important thing when reusing holes for lag bolts (or screws in general) in a material that the screw will cut threads in (i.e. wood, but also applies more generally to any material much softer than the screw being driven) is to turn the bolt backwards (counterclockwise for a normal right hand thread) until you feel it "drop in" to the existing thread - ...


1

Yes, you can reuse screw holes in wood or plastic. Just make sure the new screw has the same diameter, thread pitch, and thread shape. When reattaching, roll the screw backwards a couple of revolutions and feel for the "hop" of it dropping into the existing thread. Sometimes there's a little hop and a big hop; you want the big hop. If you do much ...


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Why reuse the existing holes? Just offset it especially given one of the lags snapped and you wouldn't be able to reuse that hole anyway. I've snapped lag screws before probably because I didn't pilot with the correct size drill bit or pilot at all. If you did want to go up a size in lag, you could probably just drill the holes out the tiny bit extra ...


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Using the existing holes should be fine, so don't worry about that. There's a few other things I'll mention tho. The lag bolt shouldn't have broken unless it had some severe manufacturing defect. When inserting large lag bolts, you should always pre-drill with the correct sized bit. You can also lubricate the bolt with a bit of wax or soap when screwing ...


1

Attaching a short block of 2xN (12", 16", double 8", whatever works) across 2 or 3 of those flat studs should provide a rigid enough support with 3" of depth for a 4-corner lag attached TV mount. The 2xN is screwed to the studs every few inches with enough smaller fasteners with enough bite depth, spreading a heavy load well despite the short bite depth. It ...


1

Home Depot sells them as "threaded inserts" on their website and the folks who work at your local store should be able to point you in the right direction. They're used to provide threads for a machine screw in wooden pieces so that they can be assembled/disassembled more easily. They tend to strip out in softwoods and particle boards quite easily if you'...


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This is what you are looking for. They are available in different sizes so you'll need to determine the screw size. https://www.mcmaster.com/95596a500


7

It's a countersink style bolt or screw that comes with the ubiquitous Swedish "assemble-it-yourself" furniture and now some knock-off Ikea copycat furniture. If you look in the fastener section of your Big Box hardware store it will be with other fasteners labeled "furniture fasteners"; often sold in little packages, sometimes in the "specialty fastener" ...


13

While difficult to tell for sure I think it is an E-Z Lok threaded insert. It consists of a course threaded screw that is inserted into the wood. A pilot hole is drilled and the insert is screwed in with a Allen wrench until it is flush. The center of the insert is tapped for a machine screw. The advantage of this fastener is it can be disassembled numerous ...


2

The item looks like a grubscrew.


4

Socket head capscrew or Allen head capscrew


0

Without any sort of picture, one technique that has worked for me is to pull on the screw to pull it out and then rotate gently - friction between the nut and its surface then allows the screw to come undone. Tricky part is getting the “best” amount of pull compared to rotate. If it was cross-threaded then you are out of luck, see the next bit... If all ...


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