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24

A Crowfoot Wrench would work nicely. A 10 piece set of these is only $15.00


16

I'm a gas fitter and service tech. My bag has the tools to do the job. Sometimes these tight spots require a bit of a turn with one tool and a bit of a turn with another. A lot of the available arc can be chewed up by lash, torsion and flex of components. The first tool I'd reach for, for something like this is a line wrench. I'd get a 12 point Amazon ...


16

This is a tamper proof torx screw. There are torx bits with a hole in the center that will remove them, if you are bold you can try smacking the center pin with a punch at an angle (small ones usually snap off) and then a standard torx bit can be used to remove it. Check online and I bet you can find a tamper proof bit kit for under 15$.


15

What you may be overlooking, or what may not be present on your wrench, is the the open wrench is not square to the shaft. It is canted by 1/24 of a circle (15 degrees). As a result, there's a 30 degree difference between the wrench (normal) and (flipped). That means you only need a 30 degree arc of motion, not a 60 degree arc. When you run out of ...


15

The best tool I have found for the type of application you are working with is a 12-point split-box wrench. These are also available in a 6-point design. (Picture Source: http://constructionmanuals.tpub.com/14256/css/Types-and-Uses-Continued-156.htm) The split end lets the wrench get onto a fitting even when a tubing is inline. The box construction also ...


13

While difficult to tell for sure I think it is an E-Z Lok threaded insert. It consists of a course threaded screw that is inserted into the wood. A pilot hole is drilled and the insert is screwed in with a Allen wrench until it is flush. The center of the insert is tapped for a machine screw. The advantage of this fastener is it can be disassembled numerous ...


8

A turn is 360 degrees. You are expected to put a mark on the thing you are turning, so you can observe its rotation. They have no way of knowing which kind of wrench you are using, what your wrenching style is, or what amount of swing angle local clearances will afford you. "Hand/finger tight" is the point at which all free lash/slop has been removed, ...


7

It's a countersink style bolt or screw that comes with the ubiquitous Swedish "assemble-it-yourself" furniture and now some knock-off Ikea copycat furniture. If you look in the fastener section of your Big Box hardware store it will be with other fasteners labeled "furniture fasteners"; often sold in little packages, sometimes in the "specialty fastener" ...


5

An open end Ratchet wrench is likely the best tool for this job. Something like this:


4

A hook wrench (as used on bicycles) https://bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/16291/what-tool-is-needed-to-adjust-this-headset-on-a-childrens-bike


4

My guess would be a carriage bolt, but it's impossible to tell for sure. Take the nut off the inside, hit the bolt with a mallet and see what happens. Edit based on addition of interior photo... I wonder if that big black cylinder is some type of damper intended absorb shock and vibration. Maybe the one on the other side failed and they replaced it with ...


4

The 1/2" bolts will hold up your truck, or thereabouts, so that's not an issue. I'd be concerned about the pullout strength of the deck screws (especially if your rack was particularly big or you have a fondness for cast iron). Upgrade to something a little bigger. I'd lean toward a 1/4" lag screw, 3" or so, assuming that fits the flange. If that doesn't ...


4

Socket head capscrew or Allen head capscrew


3

There's either some space behind there, or they go right through the wall and the nuts are on the other side of the wall. There may be a compact/flattish bracket (not requiring removal of these bolts to remove the backboard), these pictures are not helpful in assessing that possibility. If there's really no space, get behind that wall and look.


3

Appearance aside (perhaps your less than 10 lb items will cover the hanging point) plumbing test plugs come to mind. Exposed face commonly seen red, yellow and shiny galvanized steel. Two plates are squeezed together by a screw and cause a rubber part between to expand outward and grip the hole. Advantage being they are easily removed and no permanent damage/...


3

One solution I have is a set of wrenches with angled heads - you can see one end has a greater angle than the other, very handy in many situations : Mind you, the set cost me quite a bit... But that was a long time ago.


3

That is the pin or dowel that go to a cam lock for furniture. Here is website i found that has some. If you do not it find there you can check in the furniture parts drawers at you local hardware store or search for furniture parts online. You will need to measure its length, i would think most are going to be classified in the metric system, mm or cm. ...


3

Whether the 2" side up or the 4" side up, it doesn't matter in terms of the stress on the bolt. We can do a simple analysis as below. In the figure below your T-shaped bracket in drawn in blue while the two bolts are drawn in red. For simplicity we assume that the bracket only contacts the wall via the two bolts at the very top and very bottom end. W is the ...


3

In my analysis your design is not going to be adequate. Here are the main points: Box steel with just 3mm thick walls can deform when squeezed under bolting pressure or when subjected to torsional pressure when bolted through the box. Carriage bolts with the square tang under the head are meant to be used with wood. Unless you intend use dozens of hours ...


3

The middle photo will be best with a spacer underneath. Since the top screw is doing the lions share of supporting the awning then the spacer is really just keeping the bracket solid and not holding as much weight but use a screw that will get through the shingles and into the sheathing. Pre drill pilot holes and insert an outdoor rated caulking into each ...


3

Your picture shows a Security Torx screw head. You can find a good overview on most common screw drives for identification on a specific wikipedia page.


2

It is called a four pin spanner socket. Finding one the correct size may be difficult. I would try a local tool supplier with a liberal return policy so if you select the wrong one you can exchange it. There are standard sizes but I have run into some specialty sizes (correct diameter but wrong pin size) issues. If you are handy with a die grinder you can ...


2

It looks to me like a bit of a can of worms. The perforated angle iron is set up so that the holes are right on the edge of the vertical drywall - there's nothing solid for them to anchor to. But you don't have much flexibility placing the track, it has to line up with the door. That jog in the ceiling is in a very inopportune spot. It's a bit of a ...


2

All the units are in English These are English, Imperial, or more technically ANSI (A for American) fasteners. They are not metric. The holes that are slightly large of 6mm are actually for 1/4" bolts. As they say, the bolts are 1-1/4" long. Typically this will be 1/4-20 unless there is an extraordinary need for strength. Since they are bolt-nut ...


2

EDIT this won't work because in this instance the fastener is obstructed by a pipe. Leaving for completeness. There appears to be plenty of width to the slot. How about a socket with a long extension bar and a universal joint? They add slop but that's no more than annoying. You'd require a deep socket to go over any bolt too.


2

I can think of two things. When installing, being horizontal will help the wings unfold, as one of them isn't fighting gravity. Once installed, load is often in shear (meaning not straight-out, but at an angle downward). If installed vertically, this will put much more load on the top wing of the toggle than the bottom wing, and it could be a "point ...


2

The item looks like a grubscrew.


1

No, I would not trust those welds to hold for long under the loading effects due to swinging. I would get bolts / hooks (3/8" dia min) that bolt through the plate which I would also have as 3/8" thick. Edit, how about these: Link to source https://www.easternjunglegym.com/heavy-duty-ductile-swing-hanger


1

That depends on the design of the toggle. Some have internal springs that mean the direction does not matter - except for being aware of the support it is clamping to. Others use their own mass to cantilever themselves into position so with those you have to get them positioned correctly. Sometimes I have had a toggle close to a joist / object so it can ...


1

Finger tight will engage the wedge against the sleeve. You need 3-4 full 360 degree turns to lift the wedge 3-4 full threads and apply the intended lateral force against the sides of the drilled hole. Many plumbing fittings with rubber gaskets or cone washers will say something like "1/4 turn past finger tight". It means the same thing.


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