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15

Wiring Diagrams Locate the schematic In most cases, a wiring diagram can be located inside the HVAC unit. Typically, it will be on the inside of the access cover. Find the transformer on the schematic Once you've located the diagram, you'll want to look for this symbol. Or the actual text that says "Transformer", which may be labeling a crudely ...


7

does the spin on that impeller (at a high velocity) really create enough momentum to move water up seven or eight stories? It doesn't have to create momentum as it isn't throwing water ballistically. It just has to create a small difference in pressure. Note that you ask about circulating water, not pumping it up into a tank. The pump does not have to ...


5

I know it's in the comments, but I feel it's important enough to place in an answer: Never EVER throw water on a fire that is , or might be, oil or gasoline - based! If your furnace does not have an automatic thermal cutoff valve on the fuel line inlet, you're out of code (at least in Massachusetts), and should definitely have a plumber install one. Keep a ...


5

Sadly, the answer is "no". Hot water, both in the boiler and in the radiators, is very corrosive IF there is oxygen in it. Water from your well or town has dissolved air, including oxygen (it's why fish survive in water). Once the water is in the system, the oxygen combines with the boiler/radiator linings, corroding it. There isn't a lot of oxygen in any ...


5

TL;DR: is there a way to put the zone valves into a forced-closed position? Taco zone-valve (wax piston actator): disconnect top wire at contact marked #1 and wait 2 mins, or disconnect all wires, wait two minutes, rotate head and remove. Zone valves with a synchronous motor remove the head. Further to Tkw's answer, heres the inside of a zone valve. ...


5

TLDR: Plastic tubing seems the safest to use. You may be able to use certain types of metal in some cases, but acidity in the condensate can damage those materials. ICC model building code as an example says the following (in part): SECTION 314 - CONDENSATE DISPOSAL [M] 314.1 Fuel-burning appliances. Liquid combustion byproducts of condensing appliances ...


5

It's a new problem. First, do anything you want. It's your health and there's no legal mandate, yet. The legionella issue is actually quite new. The disease itself wasn't even identifed until 1976 at the US Bicentennial in Philadelphia, when a bunch of people at a hotel got sick and died. Only this mass-casualty event made anyone notice and start to ...


5

You want to get that corrected. Plate heat exchangers like the one you have can be used in two arrangements: parallel flow (co-current): both inlets on one end, outlets on the other, which is what you have at present, counterflow (counter-current): one inlet on each end (what you are supposed to have) Cruithne9, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons The rate ...


5

The left part of the circuit diagram tells you how to connect the device, the right part tells you its internals. You need only to understand the left part in order to install it; the right part can be useful if you need to troubleshoot a problem. You should connect the hot (live) wire to the terminal marked 1 in the device, and the neutral wire to terminal ...


4

We ended up bleeding the radiators, upping the pressure, and replacing the thermocouple. After all of that, we discovered that flames had been shooting out of the front of the boiler and melted half of the valve, messing up the electronics for the pilot light. We ended up replacing the entire boiler since it was 35 years old anyway, but the reason for the ...


4

Okay... After reviewing your new photos, I think I have it figured out. This is what your system looks like You'll have to excuse the glitter pens, it's the only thing I could find on my wife's desk. It's pretty simple actually. When a thermostat calls for heat, the valve for that zone opens, and the boiler is also signaled via the auxiliary switch in ...


4

Unless you have a written local amendment disallowing it there is no reason this would be unsafe or prohibited. I have seen and worked on many, many basements that fit this exact description. My only concern would be keeping the area clear of lint from the dryer.


4

Your diagnostics so far point to the indirect hot water heater coil leaking potable water into the furnace loop as the most likely issue. You could perhaps verify if you can shut your hot water down for a few days (not convenient, I know.) Depending on the overall condition of the indirect water heater tank, the coil can often be replaced as a part, if the ...


4

The room thermostat does not control the boiler directly. Instead, it controls a circulating pump that draws heat from the boiler and delivers it to the radiator(s) in the room. It is the removal of heat that subsequently causes the boiler to fire, when its thermostat indicates that its internal temperature has dropped because of the heat removal. It sounds ...


4

Your tank is in fact not oval, but stadium in profile. (Yes, that's where the sports facilities got their name.) In the case of a tank measuring 60" × 40" × 27", your volume is (nominally) that of a box measuring 60 × (40-27) × 27 plus a cylinder of diameter 27 (radius 13.5) and length 60. 60 × 13 × 27 = 21,060 cubic ...


4

If you can stop the flow of water in the system you can freeze the water in the pipe, then fix whatever you have to. This works on steel and copper pipe. I have frozen pipes up to 2 inches. A pipe freezing kit is great but you can also use dry ice. Find a place that sells dry ice and buy the crushed type. Make sure you use heavy gloves to protect your hands....


3

They could meter the hot water you use from the boiler individually, but not the gas used to fire the boiler.


3

Nope. One boiler means only one opportunity to meter the gas.


3

Other than looking for hidden bleeders (i.e. I have one where the baseboard cover needs to be removed to reveal the bleeder) and bleeding any bleeders that you can find, you may need to swear at whoever put in the new radiators and retrofit bleeders where they are missing. There is often an automatic bleeder/vent on or just after (in which case it's often ...


3

Look for a scrap metal dealer in your area. If you deliver the steel parts to the recycler, you ought to get at least $400 per tonne (which is $440 per U.S. ton or $0.22 per pound). See this.


3

Low water Air lock or circulator not working is most common problems. What is the pressure of system ? Should be around 12 cold 20 hot. Add water to system if lower. You may have automatic feeder. Check for any air bleeder that can be open.


3

For rented or owned accomodation the HSE guidance is reasonably clear Since 31 October 1998, any room converted to use as sleeping accommodation should not contain the following types of gas appliances: A gas fire, gas space heater or a gas water heater (including a gas boiler) over 14 kilowatts gross input unless it is room sealed. A gas fire, gas space ...


3

The advice is for the purpose of avoiding frozen pipes. The larger the difference in thermostat settings, the longer the heat will be off. The longer the heat is off, the bigger the temperature differences between the cold parts of the room and the warm parts of the room. Your thermostat is likely to be in a warmer part of the room (inside wall, at eye ...


3

You're right, but only because oil is the worst, most expensive way to heat a home. Pretty much anything beats it, except maybe electric resistance in places with high electricity prices. Wood, gas, and heat pump electric will all beat the pants off oil. That said, even 80% efficiency may be optimistic for a modern high efficiency wood stove. But even if ...


3

Do you know the temperature of steam pipes? Do you know the ignition point of wood? Some say the "ignition" point of wood is 451 deg F. Most say around 570 deg F. Either way, the surface temperature of steam pipes will NEVER even get close to that. Typically upwards of 250 deg F. I think you can trust your plumber on this one.


3

Why is knob and tube top priority to replace? It's quite safe if left alone. You only need to replace it in visible areas: the stuff behind the wall doesn't need replacing. You might want to add some circuits in certain rooms, but you don't have to remove the old ones. No upgrading the radiators (from your description they don't sound like baseboard ...


3

Looks the same as mine, and since I've ended up here with the same question, I thought I'd update with an answer. Looking at the third photo it looks as though you have the filling loop permanently fitted (as I do), with the two end caps hanging down. On the videos I've seen on Youtube and the Baxi website the taps are black and round, but yours is the same ...


3

Assuming that your boiler and mine are similar, you have two vents or pipes and the main exhaust. Main exhaust will emit carbon dioxide and water vapour, the products of combustion. A modern boiler exhausts gas at a lower temperature than earlier ones, having given some heat to the incoming air, so it is possible to see the water vapour condense to form a ...


3

The most common size is 275 gallons, which measures 44” x 60” x 27”


3

You should seek the advice from a recognized medical practitioner. You wouldn't place your health and well-being on the answers of people who drink beer and chew tobacco all day would you? If I had to offer an answer I would suggest that if you notice any type of petroleum or other noxious fumes it would be wise not to do aerobics there.


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