7

I did it both ways in a laundry/powder room I completed last year. Along the one wall, I installed the nailing plates your described. Along another wall, I didn't, in part because the sole plate for the wall had to be down before the subfloor, in order to run the plumbing. Also this area holds the washer/dryer & a utility sink, so no foot traffic. In ...


6

If I don't install a nailing edge, is it likely I will have a noticeable bounce? No, because you can't stand that close to the wall. The only unsupported edge is right at the face of the wall If I should install a nailing edge, but can't fit a full height joist in place, will a 2x4 add enough rigidity to be worth the energy to install? Yes. A 2x4 is ...


5

You defiantly need to support the subfloor around the perimeter. Let's say this is your floor without plywood. You want to put plywood down, but the edge of the sheet has nothing under it for support. If you don't support the plywood, you'll end up with a "soft" spot around the perimeter. Stepping, or adding weight to this area will cause the ...


4

it doesn't matter, because the stresses on between-stud blocking is 100% horizontal compression. The vertical orientation of the deep face absolutely doesn't matter...though having it horizontal, spanning the full width of the studs would help to prevent torsion/twisting forces, and thus would be ever-so-slightly preferred.


4

Horizontal blocking IS used with 2x lumber on edge for non-structural reasons: grab bar blocking, plumbing fixtures (notably freestanding wall sinks) and kitchen cabinets. Its usually shifted to the front of the wall, just behind the drywall. For sinks, 2x6 is usually used, allowing a range of mounting heights, ditto for grab bars in baths and showers. ...


4

None of the three options you've shown are likely to add substantial strength or stiffness to your floor. To add either, you'll need a single, continuous additional member to span the majority of the joist length. The blocking is probably not critical, especially if you're doubling the joists for most of their length. It's typically installed to prevent ...


3

Not really. 8 feet is a fairly short span, and you're unlikely to see substantial movement even with some warpage. It certainly won't be enough to reduce the capacity of the floor to a dangerous degree. (No deck I ever recall seeing has had joist blocking.) Minor point of clarification: Blocking doesn't reduce cupping (curvature of lumber across the grain). ...


3

Usually the HVAC subs knock them out and leave them out, but if you place something like a 1X4 or heavier between the 2 joists at the bottom, it would stabilize the movement of joist deflection. Make sure it is a tight fit.


3

I chose if I need blocking by placing 2 pieces of flooring on top of each other and stepping in the middle of a span. If the deflection is excessive and it is a high traveled area like a entry door I will block (I normally block at perpendicular entry’s). At a wall I don’t block in most cases unless the flex in 2 boards is noticeable, remember when you ...


2

I would definitely put in blocking along the wall. The point isn't for support of the the floor the point is to deflect some of the bounce. 2x4 blocking as close to the wall as you can get is more than adequate. Also not sure why you notched the new joist for electric (sure seems you could have went under) but I would block each side of that too.


2

Gravity. Everything pulls down. So props that hold things up resist gravity. Vertical members hold things up. Headers are spans that sit on things (jack studs) that hold things up. The header isn't the support, the studs (hopefully tied eventually to foundation elements) are. So, vertical members, including vertical blocking, are the real support. But if ...


2

I would normally say yes but it appears the 2x4 on the right is heavily notched in a weird fashion. I would keep blocking across from this to make sure that vertical 2x4 is stable. Not really sure you need a piece that big though.


2

End nailing into the brace will not be a useful and strong joint. Instead do something like the following where the brace is made of 2x lumber. Notch it as shown and set on edge and toe nailed from each side. Much stronger.


2

I would sister several of the joists, then add solid blocking in each span. The blocking might not be critical, but the ceiling is now open so why not? Solid blocking does not need strapping across the bottom. Look closely where the joists meet the load-bearing wall at each end. A 2x6 ledger might give extra assurance. Look at the rest of the floor structure ...


1

Consider simply double lining the wall. A sheet of plywood over the studs, then drywall on top. This will narrow the room by 1/2-3/4" depending on the ply, but this may not be a problem for you. You could also use thinner drywall as it doesn't have to span any gaps.


1

Yes, you can remove the blocking. Blocking is NOT structural. Blocking is only used to keep structural members plumb so they don’t lay over to one side when “fully” loaded. Actually, blocking is not required until the structural member gets to a ratio of 6:1 (i.e.: 2x12, etc.) (See IRC R502.7.1)


1

Use the full size nail gun. Cut the blocks so they fit tight. Get them into a spot where they're about 1/4 inch from where you want, because when the nail gun goes off it will push. Do one toenail through about 1 1/2 inches of the block into the stud. Fine tune it with your hammer and then do the rest of the nails. Support the other side of the block ...


1

Since you have a palm nailer, use that. However, I think it is worth mentioning that in lieu of a palm nailer, an electric screw driver, (which is more commonly owned by DIY folks than a nail gun), is easier to use in this situation than a regular hammer and nails. Oh, and the way to nail them in is to stagger the blocks. Edit: Please excuse me; for some ...


1

You are fine. Copper is pretty pliable and one soft metal. I am assuming that this branch is already working and capped. So if you do have any issues you should know right away. Also I would tell the plumber what you did so he isn't pulling out his hair if something goes wrong.


1

I am assuming that this blocking is help stabalize the framed wall on the basement walls. Normally the blocking would be inside the joists so that the 2x4 is even with the bottom of the joists. Your wall was not put up this way. Therefore your new ceiling is that low. You could cut out the 2x4 blocking, install like I said and add another 2x4 under all ...


1

Continuous blocking means that there is a block between every joist, lined up with each other. It does not mean that the blocking is one piece of wood. It does not sound like what you need from the problem you are describing. In general, no you don't need support all the edges of each panel - the edges interlock and can/should be glued - but if you are ...


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