Hot answers tagged

9

Bolts, concrete fixing bolts, recessed, optionally plugged. Strong glue All the above


8

Bolts going into a slieve like RedGrittyBrick suggested is the best answer for appearance and strength. Another option for speed and simplicity are Tapcon screws: No affiliation, and no direct experience, I'm just aware of the existence of this product.


6

Why do you need a duct? Most bathroom vanities, for example, are wide open from a slot in the floor to the louver on the kick panel. Just close off the compartment by any convenient means and call it a day. Staple some cardboard in if that works. And parts from a big box store should work just fine. A common 2x10 or whatever size duct could be laid right in ...


6

Simple really assuming you have the proper tools. Cut your 4x4's to 18 inch length Build a frame Attach to the 4x4 posts Cut wood to fit the surface of the frame Add lateral support to the 4x4 posts To join 2 benches at a corner, figure out your corner angle and modify the plans to match. Wooden Bench Plans Website


5

If all your tools are steel or other ferromagnetic material, I would try something like this: It's a magnetic knife holder that you should be able to buy at any kitchen store. Alternatively, you could build something along the lines of a traditional knife block by glue-laminating pieces of wood and leaving appropriate gaps for each square. Although, some ...


4

First, just a general note - driving lag screws like the one pictured above into concrete or stone would need an anchor drilled and set into the concrete, and you'd also want a washer. If you don't have anchors underneath, you'd probably want a concrete anchor screw or another type of fastener. That said, you'll likely be able to apply more torque with a ...


3

I'll second BMitch's TapCon screws. They work great. If you want to have some fun, you could also go with a powder actuated hammer: It's essentially a gun that will shoot a nail into the concrete. Works great. Would be super-fast (no pre-drilling). But likely the least accurate option. You'd also be left with the nail heads/washers to deal with. Style/...


3

The legs are beveled on the top and bottom so that they can lean inward a little bit. In other words, the distance between the tops of the legs is less than the distance between their bottoms. Because the bench top and feet are intended to be level, you cut a matching bevel on the top and bottom of each leg. These inward-leaning legs work in combination ...


3

You can just make your own holdfasts and dogs and dog holes in a bench and with holes bored into it. You can use a pair of saw horses to make the bench and you can make the saw horses just free handing it and sitting on the wood. Any clamping pressure can be applied either with bought clamps or a Greek vice, which is simply some cords or rope wrapped around ...


3

I have no vice and I've always been able to get by without one. In fact, in all the shows I've seen about woodworking, building houses, and doing home improvement work I cannot think of a single time I've ever seen anyone use a vice. I much more frequently use clamps anyways, which are much more versatile. Good woodworking is as much about using your ...


2

If the wheels are wobbling, that could be either a symptom or cause of other problems. A symptom, if the wheel is wobbling because a bearing is bad or because the wheel has been damaged. A cause, if an unbalanced wheel caused excessive wear on a bearing. As far as affecting the work goes, the answer is yes. There's no way to put a straight face on a wheel ...


2

Those instructions aren't very clear! I read step #7 this way: 7: Cut notches in the seat posts. Here's hints on how to do it: a) Don't assume both braces are the same size. b) Use the seat brace itself to mark the area to be cut out. c) After you've marked it, start the notch by making a cut with a circular saw. d) Now that you have a nice cut,...


2

I'll try to take your questions one-by-one. You have two easy options for leveling the chalk line. The first would be to use a carpenter's level; you'd measure 34" from the floor at one end of the bench-to-be, then hold a long 2x4 to the studs with one end right at the mark. Lay your level on the top of the 2x4 and tip the 2x4's other (not at a mark) end ...


2

I'd go to the manufacturer of the wood glue you want to use before you get too far along. Titebond is popular and I've had great luck with it, in their FAQ they have specific instructions for gluing up cedar, before you finish it, due to the oil in cedar. I think most of them are pretty oil resistant once they cure, especially polyurethane, which is ...


2

repair worn fittings / material make oversize holes and use oversize bolts install cross-bracing ...


1

Here's what I went with: It does not look pretty, but it does work. Many thanks to all who helped. :-)


1

Often seen grinders mounted on a pedestal, as long as they don’t move it gives more access for odd shaped work pieces.


1

The biggest problem with heavily loaded triangle brackets on drywall is that drywall material is not strong enough to resist being crushed by the lower end of the bracket. You will need to support the bracket with harder material. If you have a hole saw, cut some disks from hardwood or similar material the thickness of the drywall. The exact diameter of ...


1

I googled "3 plank bench" and came up with some images of the same style you have pictured


1

When I built my similar workbench, I let the 2 x 4 around the outside stand 1/4" above the surface of the bench, and then cut a piece of masonite as a replaceable bench top. Masonite with a coat of clear varnish makes a nice surface and I have replaced it 2 or 3 times.


1

I would go further in the event that you want to clamp deep throat clamps or woodworkers clamps. Hand screw clamps can be 6" or more. Keep that in mind for the future. What about a single side with a deeper inset for specialty clamps?


1

That should generally be enough. If you happen to run into a vise or lamp that wants a little more, you could edge-laminate an additional buffer strip onto the bend in that spot.


1

Depends on the type of anchor. Some cement anchors are similar to your average screw, except the threads are wider. Other cement anchors are similar to a toggle screw, and can be much larger. What follows is how to fasten a concrete anchor that is similar to a screw. You will need to drill a pilot hole with a concrete drill bit. The packaging will likely ...


1

Since I can see holes in the pan that look like they were used for installation purposes - nail holes. - An absolute certainty of failure - Tear the whole shower out. Save yourself money in the long run. I have replaced showers that are only 4 or 5 years old with small penetrations in the pan which caused major water damage to structural members. If those ...


1

One way you may be able to lower the amount of springiness in the seat slats is to add some hardwood strips to the bottom of each slat. These could be attached with sturdy wood screws similar to as shown below. These can be added as long as possible but just short of the current slat mounting to the cast iron frame.


1

Take a look at these Standardized Work Table Plans as it might give you some ideas. Obviously you would not need the lower shelf, but otherwise it would be similiar (but scaled down), and this thing can hold a lot of weight! (source: eaa1000.av.org)


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