Hot answers tagged

38

Yes. The fixture is concerned with heat. Your LED light bulb makes about 9 watts of heat. Your fixture is rated for a bulb that makes 40 watts of heat. With an incandescent bulb, 98-99% of its wattage turns directly into heat. Even LEDs, 90% of their wattage turns into heat. For thermal planning, it's not worth pulling out the calculator. You're "close ...


20

SHORT ANSWER: NO PROBLEM LONG ANSWER: The maximum wattage limits are largely a function of heat. For incandescent lights, more wattage means more heat. And too much of a heat buildup could result in shorter bulb life and even risk of fire, especially in a fixture in which the bulbs are fully enclosed. While lighting has traditionally been sold by wattage, ...


15

Conventional residential circuit breakers are safety devices that are not subject to adjustment. They are sized based on what the wires to the outlets can safely handle. As you surmised, if you want to draw more power to that area, you need more wiring.


14

There is no code that tells you that your bedroom doors need to swing in for a bedroom. But it is usually not a good idea for them to swing out. as you mentioned the doors present an obstruction in spaces. In hallways it might even be comical to wind your way around 7 open doors from both sides. when you are talking about privacy the doors have swung ...


12

Yes. You can use slats instead of a box-spring. It will be a LITTLE bit stiffer, but it's perfectly fine and you'll love how your bed squeaks less. Here's a pic from an Ikea bed frame assembly guide - just as an example:


12

In the cases where I've run I to something like this, the hotel originally had open walkways around the rooms -- allowing more light in, and probably cheaper to build -- which were later closed off with an outside wall to provide a sheltered approach to the rooms and to reduce energy needed to heat or cool the rooms. The windows were left in place because ...


10

sheet of cardboard (or similar) cut to fit inside


8

A bed frame is at best going to support the box-spring around the edges (perhaps even somewhere in the middle if there is an extra cross member). If the box spring is on the floor (or a platform bed), then it's supported everywhere. Which in my opinion is better for the mattress. Of course, your wife may dislike the look of it on the floor. I'd chock it up ...


8

Yes, this can be remedied by using a "goof plate" pictured below. If the outer diameter of the lockset is 2" or larger this plate will work. I do believe they make smaller ones if the lockset is smaller. The UPC for this product is 049793095244- Model # U-9524. Package includes 2 pieces-One for each side.


7

As Chris Cudmore states in his comment, it is most likely a leveling issue (the other, but less likely cause could be misaligned hinges). Place a level across the top of the front of the unit. Note whether it is level or not. Then do the same across the top of one of the sides. If the unit is tipped, but only front to back (the front test was level), you ...


7

Box springs help evenly distribute pressure on the mattress not just while laying but also when you're getting on/off the bed resulting in concentrated pressure points. They are for the most part, very firm and yield only the slightest bit. Most box strings don't even consist of springs at all. They normally consist of cheap flexible wood, thin upholstery ...


7

It's going to take 71.5 pounds of force pulling straight out from the wall in order to begin moving the bed downwards. The required force will actually increase a bit as the door begins to rotate and the tension from the gas springs becomes closer to perpendicular to the bed frame, and then the force required will begin to let off as you reach closer to the ...


7

The decorative nut has been removed but there is still a small little nut that is holding the little escutcheon up against the glass. Use one hand to hold the glass and try to loosen the nut with your fingers, if you can not get it to move with your fingers try a pair of pliers gently.


6

The two standard ways to strip paint is heat or chemicals. Both are labor intensive and messy, and chemicals are caustic. I assume you are planning to strip the paint only because you are left with an uneven surface after it was already partly removed? Otherwise, just paint over it right? It might be easier to lightly scrape to remove loose paint, then skim ...


6

The bigger issue is that if there are bedbugs in your apartment, the whole building is probably infested. Your best bet is probably to isolate yourself from the bedbugs and set a CO2 bedbug trap. Look into finding a new apartment.


6

First of all, building codes covering private residences are typically not the same as larger commercial buildings. In the USA those are often the IRC and IBC, respectively (although each state has their own versions and amendments). But to the issue you asked about: were the windows into the hallway operable? Hotel windows are usually inoperable and are ...


5

First off, a reality check; not trying to discourage you, just trying to set some expectations here: First off, the actual pressures you're dealing with are very small. Absolute pressure is measured in Pascals; 1Pa = .0001psi. Your 80dB sound is inducing pressure changes of approximately .2Pa = .00002psi (that's two hundred-thousandths of a psi). Second, ...


5

So based on advice from ratchetfreak in comments I took his advice and went with the 'corridor' effect on the 37" wall (pic below). As the room has two doors it gave me an interesting perspective on what the 'walking into the room' vibe was. For door #1 (the bottom door in pic) I felt like the closet made the room feel smaller on entrance. For door #2 (left ...


5

Buy paper window shades. Specifically the ones that are folded like an accordion and have an adhesive edge at the top. Trim them to the width of your windows. Lay them out flat and paint one or both sides black with spray paint. Stick them up behind the Venetian blinds. If you only painted one side then you can face the white side out if you are concerned ...


5

I am a graveyard shift worker. I found the best solution is a cheap sleep mask you can get at Walgreens. Total blackout for you leaves light when you want it. Not being sarcastic, just this is what I found over years trying to sleep during the day.


5

Microwaves go in the kitchen. I would suggest that it is up in a higher spot so kids can't play with them. That is a good reason they are often over ovens along with the venting. Also from an electric point of view almost all microwaves require a 12A dedicated circuit. For a kitchen you will probably have several runs like this and it is just bundled ...


5

When a lamp lists a maximum wattage, its doing that based on the heat an incandescent bulb of that wattage will put off. The 9W=75W on the LED bulb is telling you that "even though this bulb only uses 9W of power, it puts out the same amount of light as a 75W incandescent". Lamps are rated on heat and power usage not light output. LED bulbs do get hot, ...


4

This is how I solved exactly the same problem in my bedroom:


4

No you don't need one IF you have a foundation for the mattress to lay on, a thick sheet of plywood would do, since that is basically what a box spring us though you bed will lie 4-6 inches lower if you only have a 4 inch typical mattress.


4

It may be that the frame was originally designed to have slats span the rails, and not have the mattress (box spring) sit directly on the rails. This would have lifted the mattress up a bit, and possibly allowed it to ride over the bits that are giving you trouble. This was one persons solution:


4

If the door to the suite is in the foyer section, it could also be called the antechamber. That would make the bed section the main chamber or bedchamber. ...and of course, no discussion of chambers should ignore the chamberpot ;)


4

Go get yourself an 8' untreated 4x4 (~$10.00). Determine how much higher you'd like the bed to be, then cut the 4x4 in appropriate lengths adding an inch to each length. For example: If you want the bed to be 4" higher, cut the 4x4 in 5" lengths. using a spade or Forstner bit of appropriate size (just slightly larger than the bed frames feet, so the feet ...


4

Go to your local hardware store and buy 4 of these. Maybe $1.50 each? Bring them home, and lay them on their side. $6 and you have a very sturdy 8" lift. If you need higher, buy 4 more. If it is too heavy for you, pay a youngster $10 to haul them up the stairs. Still under $20.


4

The best way to raise your bed is too use a product designed for the task. These bed risers from The Sleep Shop will do the trick. They're going to raise your bed about three inches but keep the sturdiness so there's no rocking! They aren't the prettiest things but, they'll work!


4

A nice ladder can be built similar to the following. Use 1x4 sized material and bore holes through it to accept closet pole for rungs. Select the angle of the vertical rails to suit your space and desired usage preferences. Rung spacing should be even - but not too close together. Ladder can be simply screwed through the side rail of the bed into the edge ...


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