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5

The original framing here is balloon framing. It doesn't work the same way that platform framing works. (Platform framing variants are almost universal for well over 50 years in the US.) The studs are continuous from the plate under the rafters to the sill on the foundation. It replaced post and beam construction because it didn't rely on massive straight ...


4

I wouldn’t remove the posts. The posts have footings that support the loads from the beam. If you remove the posts and build a wall, you’ll need to install a footing under the new wall. I’d just build a non-structural infill wall under the beam.


3

Try Simpson's Outdoor Accents Product Line. Catalog here


3

There aren't many options for framing cheaper than basic 2x4 lumber. You could go down to 2x3 which is sometimes cheaper but you'll find that interior doors and insulation are generally sized for 2x4 walls with 1/2" drywall. You could also consider metal studs. These are available down to 1.5 inches in thickness (fine if all you want to do is hide the ...


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You will need to dig these trenches deep enough so that the supports for your deck are situated BELOW the frost line for your area. No amount of fill or drainage will be sufficient since it's the freezing of the moisture in the ground that causes frost heave. Get in touch with your local building codes department and get their specifications for how deep ...


2

Attaching joists (2x8 for example) to bigger beams (4x12) so that the bottom of the joist is flush with the bottom of the beam is done all the time. Here's one I did for an indoor project- Should not be any different for your roof deck. Just make sure you use the right fasteners for outdoor use.


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Joist hangers are used all the time to fix joists to the side face of the beam. I see no particular reason that you wouldn't be able to hang the joists even with the bottom of the beam using standard joist hangers like these: Picture Source In fact ceiling joists may very well be hung with similar brackets like these where the ceiling height is set to be at ...


2

When I got my first car, my Dad said, “GM builds ‘em, tests ‘em, and tells you how to maintain ‘em...so follow ALL the maintenance rules.” I think that applies here. They know what their I-joists can withstand. I’d follow it carefully. The one thing that causes problems seems to be when installers get in a hurry and “eyeball” cuts, etc. id carefully layout ...


2

The Code requires a Live Load of 40 lbs. per square foot (psf) plus a Dead Load of 10 psf for a total load of 50 psf. You indicate the beams are 8’ on center, so the total load on each beam is: 50 psf x 8’ (4’ on ea.side of beam) = 400 plf In addition, the code requires an adjustment for wood being pressure treated. If wood is pressure treated without ...


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Because the beam transfers load to the posts, and because the posts presumably have point-load footings under them, you'll need to replace the beam even if you build a wall. Therefore, replace the beam (and the posts, if you like), but a wall is pointless unless you want to divide the space.


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Mostly because it's a modern standard in wall construction. There's no motivation for an architect (or a carpenter) to cheap out for a little bit of wood on a one-off basis. It may not strictly be necessary here, but the cost of a couple boards is less than that of the professional time spent deliberating the issue.


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I think your choice of 5/16" size lag screws, 2-1/2" long, is fine. I would say 3/8" is overkill but if you just like the look of the bigger fastener, it would be fine. I'd actually use something a little smaller, but longer - 1/4" size, and 3" long. (And washers, whatever size you use, I'd use washers.) One of those is adequate to ...


2

Double top plates are used to 1) tie interior walls to exterior walls (with lapped plates), and 2) creating a perimeter chord that is tied together (lapped plates) for the roof to create a structural shear diaphragm. I doubt if your engineer did a very thorough structural analysis because your new header is greatly oversized from the original header. However,...


2

No, it is lazy. A double joist hanger should be used for a double joist with few exceptions. Whether it is legal or not depends on how your state and local community have developed, adopted, and interpret building codes. From a structural standpoint it may be insignificant under certain conditions. Is it worrisome: an engineer would be your best source but ...


2

Can it be done? Sure. Is it practical? - you'll need to discuss with the engineer and consider the impact on your budget. Basically you will need to increase the strength (and usually the size, to get that strength) of the beam that crosses the space so that it can support the beam going down the middle of the extension. Likewise, it will require a ...


1

I suggest TapCon concrete fasteners with washers. They come with a disposable masonry drill bit for pre-drilling. Use a hammer-drill. Another option is powder actuated nails, but a concrete beam might be made from concrete that is too hard for PAT nails to penetrate.


1

While not an answer, this is the only way I can post a picture. Here is what a properly installed lintel looks like, at least in my mind. Note that the bricks overhang the lintel by a tiny (1/4"?) bit.


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Adjacent houses had one of the nastier asbestos boards in the groove seen between the joists and under the metal. Then the regular plasterboard layer. Fireboard is what we put up in the same position, then plasterboard. "Grandfathered in" being the position re regulations. Legally, we need fireproofing to regulations for steel beams as: in the ...


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Are you sure your steel beam is a W16X26? I doubt that beam needs lateral bracing, because that size beam will support about 31,000 lbs. per foot for a 20’ span. (That size beam can support my entire house and 3 of my neighbor’s houses.) Lateral bracing is required when a beam is fully stressed (or overly stressed) and you need to keep the beam from buckling ...


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Would it be legal, on the west coast it would be. I would reconsider and at least get a paint on wood preservative and put a coat on it prior to building the deck. Moisture is not the only issue with wood outside. I live in Oregon and have lived in California and Washington state. I have built many decks and replaced quite a few. Some of the issues with ...


1

You have several issues: 1) new beam size, 2) adequate connections to the footings, 3) lateral loads, 4) footing size I’m am American so I don’t know anything about meters, but I’ll try. It appears you want a 2.4m opening (about 8’). You have one upper floor plus a roof system resting on this wall (header). So the kitchen side has 2.5m (7’) floor joists ...


1

There is unfortunately no way of calculating this unless given blueprints of the house. Even if we did calculate it and even we overdid it, for something this big no inspector will pass it without an architect stamp. I can mention two things before you start this... given the current construction I don't think the beam will be a big deal. you will almost ...


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You can do it with LVL. Grabbing the first LVL spec sheet I came across (Boise Cascade, from https://www.bc.com/versa-lam-lvl-span-size-chart/), I find a Versa-Lam LVL 2.1E 3100 has an allowable bending stress of 3100 psi. That will get you above the 2930 psi from your friend's calculations. So let's start there. That LVL comes in (among other sizes) 3.5&...


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Beams are designed to support “Live Loads” and “Dead Loads”. All materials that are applied to a beam will make them deflect. If you use material like gypsum board it may crack, because it’s not designed to deflect. If you use wood trim or siding, it won’t crack because it’s made to deflect (somewhat). If you don’t know the design or the live and dead loads ...


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Joists crossing on top of beams is much stronger. this is because when joists are butted up to beans they are flexible at the join. I would try to avoid nail lamination in an outdoor location and instead use full-size beams and joists, if the beams must be laminated seal the top to keep rain out of the crack.


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Forte Web is an excellent tool for designing wood beams. That being said, it can take a point live load at mid-span of 610 pounds. Make sure you purchase #1 or select structural. You don't want any knots in the beam because of the types of forces a swing will apply to it.


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Try: Simpson CCQ4.62-3.62SDS Or for end conditions: ECCQ4.62-3.62SDS https://www.strongtie.com/sdsscrewcolumncaps_columncaps/ccq-eccq_productgroup_wcc/p/ccq.eccq#LoadTables Click on load tables for exact dimensions.


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You want the post and beam to have the same width dimension. Although you're trying to recycle, it's best to build this with a 6x6 beam and 6x6 posts. It will be stronger and look nicer anyways. Attach them together with the Simpson LCE4 seen below. A total of 4 of them will be needed and each of them will need (14) 0.162 x 3 1/2 into the beam and (10) 0.162 ...


1

Will adding more 2x10’s to the 4 existing help and if so how many in total would be required ? This is very common for older stick framed homes that were not engineered and the code very minimal. The reason is obvious, it is not constructed strong enough What you did with the 2x10's is called 'sistering' or 'sistered.' The way that you did it does not add ...


1

I had a similar situation, only it involved removing some load bearing walls. The wall framed what originally was the furnace (boiler) room in the house. Inside that room was a ~3'x6' entry into the attic. So the wall on two sides of the room provided the support for the ceiling joists, similar to the way your floor joists rested on the old wall for the ...


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