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If its not exposed much for appearance, cheap architectural, sub-floor adhesive prevents squeaks on 2x8 sub-floors and sticks to everything. High VOC types dryfast but are obsolete so the LePages PL * Polyurethane bond in a large tube may take a day get firm and few days to harden like ABS. apply with a caulking gun. extremely durable to everything and ...


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You could make a clamp out of two 2" x 4" pieces of wood 0.5" or 0.75" thick which would hold the fitting against the tub. Two screws or two bolts in the plane of the tub would pull the two pieces of wood together around the fitting. You could cut or rasp notches in the two pieces to keep them in place as the clamp is tightened.


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Remove the incorrect fitting, replace with a drop-ear elbow, and mount a hunk of wood to mount the drop ear elbow to. This will be awkward and annoying to do (through that hole) but should be possible. You may (or will) need a longer hunk of pipe for the tub spout mount. Other ways might be possible, but will be kludges, (like the "giant glob of ...


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It is hard to tell if the floor has rot or if that is just mold. If this is just mold confined to the top layer of your osb and the osb seems structurally sound I'd probably: wear a mask, turn the fan on, get a bucket of bleach water and some shop paper towel, wear gloves, aggressively scrub the area with shop towels. I'd probably get a plastic wire brush ...


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My suggestion paint the mold with Javex and ventilate room with open window until white and dry, the. Scrape residue to hard clean surface, vacuum clean up and seal tub well. Ensure tile grout is seal coated for moisture resistance. Then get 2 more quotes.


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Not only cement board (hardi is fine) but you must go 3-4 feet up. Do not just cut a strip near your tub. For a tub the absolute minimum is 3' up around the tub is either cement board or drywall with membrane or drywall plus cement board. The 3' isn't "code" either. Your local inspector might require higher. I am just giving you the minimum ...


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The spot next to the tub is a trouble area. I have found that the more robust the wall material is (i.e. less porous, harder) the longer it will last without water damage, that is why I tiled that area next to my tub. "...should I use cement board or dry wall?" I recommend cement board. Furthermore, I encourage you to use a harder plaster ...


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NO WAY!!!! If I understand you correctly, you want to run 2 15A circuits over one cable. You can't do that. (There are certain exceptions involving a 3-wire cable, but I assume you are describing an ordinary 2-wire (plus ground) cable.) Depending on how you wire up those two circuits, you would either end up overloading the wires (30A on wires designed for ...


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That’s a heavy duty sandwich. I would probably leave the ply up. I don’t use it just backer board. I would leave it up because of the holes in the barrier would be leak points. In the past I have tiled directly to plywood 3/4 and thicker. using thin set to bond the backer to the ply and then screw them together this will make a very solid base. once all the ...


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I don’t know the brand but a plumber is not needed you could do it with a 45$ torch if you don’t have one. I would pull the o ring and heat the end with a torch using players to hold the outer brass (yellow metal), make Sure to put some wet towels down as you slip the fitting off you don’t want the hot solder to damage the tub. I like mapp Gas torches over ...


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If the framing is 16" on center or closer where the 2 long edges meet on the larger wall, I have never added any blocking. If the centers are 24", that is a bit of a stretch and needs to be blocked. I am presuming the narrow end walls are not an issue, since the sheet will go in vertically, and the seam will be above any reason to need blocking.


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Yes, blocking is required at all edges. Blocking provides support if someone pushes on the wall in the future or if there is building movement in the future.


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Looking at the drawing and photo I'd have thought you just need to get a small screwdriver or awl in the gap you've shown there, and the one on the other side and gradually work it out, ensuring it stays straight. If you work it out a bit at a time, alternating sides, make sure to support the side you've just moved, or it may simply pivot on the middle ...


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