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29

My speculation is the reason you can't find resources for that specific approach is because that approach is inferior in almost all ways to modern tub construction. Most importantly: tile and grout is mostly water-tight; fiberglass or cast-iron tubs are entirely water-tight. As you probably know, any amount of regular water leakage into unintended areas can ...


16

If you plan to stay in the house until you are old, consider what amenities you'd like to have when stairs become difficult, impossible, or risky for your aging self to use. Stair lifts have their limits, and having to move out of your house due to factors you built into it is annoying, if you would otherwise prefer to stay. In some cases this may lead you ...


15

The key questions are: Is it warranted? For how long? Are you willing to accept liability for failure after that period (or after the company closes its doors)? Does the warranty cover replacement expenses? I'd wager no. The problem there is apparent. Don't do it unless you have no practical alternative or are compensated for potential costs in advance.


14

You can make a tub out of tile. There are some issues to think about: you will need a thicker more rigid structure for the tub and they can be made custom to an area and look great. The massive amount of tile and concrete cools the water very quickly which can be mitigated somewhat. I tried several methods and found a water jacket water heater with a ...


13

I would send it back and for sure not get that type of tub again. If tubs are cracking during the shipping process I would not trust them to stay in one piece when there is a bunch of weight and water in them. I mean I wouldn't even think about it. I have had cracked tubs come to me for new bathrooms and I have never thought about getting a new one. ...


9

Children, especially young ones (diaper/nappy age), can often need a bath in the middle of the night to clean up from accidents. Turning on the lights, running a tub, and cleaning up the kid are enough hassle at 2am without having to also make a trip down and up the stairs. Plus 1 for having the tub on the same floor as the bedrooms.


5

The drain parts (the drain assembly is called a waste & overflow unit) can be disconnected from above, there should be no other direct connections to the tub. Just unscrew and remove the overflow trip-plate and disconnect it from the stopper mechanism (called the bucket & wire assembly). The drain strainer can be removed from the tub drain shoe by ...


4

What it looks like you are getting out of the gap is the old grout and the caulk holding onto the grout. The grout when it was applied was the finish on the surface, but then the house dried out since it was new construction and caused some of the grout to loosen, so it was caulked at a later time. You are simply removing something that needs to be removed ...


4

In fancy construction, I believe that the tub is usually placed in the "master bathroom" under the assumption that it would be mainly used by one of the occupants of that room. A smaller downstairs bathroom would mainly be used by guests, children, or elderly for whom a dedicated shower (no tub with high stepover) is the appropriate and much, much ...


4

I have found (over many years and snaking hundreds of drains) that the ability to get past a bend in the line is directly related to your technique (read, experience) and the tool you are using. Cheap cables are prone to flex too much and are difficult to get around some bends, especially if you've kinked it (although I keep a few cheap ones, I call them &...


4

I've worked with those fittings and they are top of the line. I wouldn't be replacing them based on what I see in the pictures. You might want to remove the rubber gaskets and replace them. You'll need to stop by a plumbing supply store to get them as I doubt your home store will have them. I'm not sure what's on the other side of the wall of the drain but ...


4

Affordable? I have no idea. Affordability is relative to the size of your bank account. Reasonable? Probably not, they don't seem very comfortable. Do a Google search for "tile tubs" or just see the image below. If you get inspired by the image then make sure to give the outer edge a gentle slope into the tub. Water-proofing is probably on-par with ...


3

I have seen many diy fails even with products pros use to make beautiful repairs. I would suggest a bathtub chip and repair company. They can repair the chip and buff out the tub so it is invisible. There are porcelain repair products out there that can be done on the side wall but these require additional tools a dual action sander is one of those tools I ...


3

(Answering my own question.) After trying a million things, I went with the destructive option. I used a metal file to shave a hole into the knob so I could access the screws on the plate behind it. I unscrewed the screws, turning the knob to be able to access each screw, and then took the whole assembly out. Afterwards, I soaked the still-fused-together ...


3

Acetone. Acetone breaks it down into a consistency of Elmer's glue but very gooey. Then I took a paint scraper razor blade and it peels similiar to latex paint but a little tougher. I'm not quit finished because I ran out of acetone. Once off, I will have to see if I can get the tub to its original state. If not, I'll order Rustoleum online. I used it ...


3

When the faucets are turned off when you are finished showering the diverter will usually not drop by itself. The diverter is held up by the column of water in the shower pipe. Once the column of water is reduced due to dripping of the diverter, the diverter stem will fall and reopen the spout to its normal position. How long that takes is dependent on how ...


3

As I mentioned in a comment, this is largely a matter of personal preference, available resources, etc. What I would want to do is remove the tub. I can't say if that's what I'd end up doing. My reasoning: Deck tile should really extend underneath the tub flange. It won't look great if you have to fit tile around it and grout to it, even if you caulk. A ...


3

There are a few things you can. Get a rod that fits into the pipe about three to four inches without a lot of play and try to bend the pipe ever so slightly just enough to square it with the tile. You could also file down the part of the spout that hits the wall first and do so until the entire spout seats against the wall. Last but not least, just install ...


3

Well, that's a code violation, at least under IPC. 1002.8 A recess provided for connection of the underground trap, such as one serving a bathtub in slab-type construction, shall have sides and a bottom of corrosion-resistant, insect- and verminproof construction. Additionally, it sounds like the tub (with a 2 foot square hole under it) may not be "...


2

You either have a useless tub taking up space, or you do what needs doing to fix it so it's useable. You may also have a claim against your "home inspector" for not catching it - that sort of thing is exactly why you wasted money to hire them, after all. I would go in prepared to "break tile" (more likely I'd cut it out, actually - it's neater, and I'm not ...


2

Build a filler shelf or projection. Nicely done it can be storage for bath gel etc Or you can use it for candles for added ambience... And had to do a shelf like that for an 8" gap due to the size of the bathroom and the cast iron bath that needed to be retro-fitted. Some nice stained wood and tight edges with sealer and it is not a problem. Also had a ...


2

My cross bars were broken totally... So there was just the round cylinder. I took a sturdy hammer and by putting the claw end inside the cylinder, you can then pull or push the claw into the side of the cylinder. Keeping the pressure applied, turn the hammer's handle and believe it or not it will turn the cylinder. Some people put the claw on the bottom of ...


2

Get an enameled steel one instead. One in picture looks like acrylic tub, and these appear to be quite fragile (and expensive). Good old enameled steel is more durable and easier to replace - it doesn't even need fancy supports. If you are after "not so cold to the touch" feeling of acrylic tub, you can put the steel one into a dedicated styrofoam stand, so ...


2

If you are removing this unit to replace with a new unit, then I would either: drill out the setscrew - not much care needed as it’s being replaced. But if it was to be re-used then putting the drill in a jig to save the threads would help. just use a grinder to cut the old unit up - protect the worktop and surrounding surfaces from the debris.


2

What about a "Pythagorean cup" style of device? from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagorean_cup The cup consists of a bowl with a tube in an inverted U-shape. Once the bowl fills beyond the top of the U-tube (step C above) it starts a siphon which drains the volume of the bowl until the siphon breaks. As long as the siphon flow is ...


2

I'm not an expert in this material, but here's my first inclination. Turn the tub over in a good workspace. Using a rotary tool (Dremel) or similar, channel out the outside of the crack to a depth of at least 1/4" (6mm). Keep this channel just the width of a carving bit--say 1/8" (3mm). Channel the entire length of the crack to a uniform depth, ...


2

Looking at the drawing and photo I'd have thought you just need to get a small screwdriver or awl in the gap you've shown there, and the one on the other side and gradually work it out, ensuring it stays straight. If you work it out a bit at a time, alternating sides, make sure to support the side you've just moved, or it may simply pivot on the middle ...


2

My suggestion paint the mold with Javex and ventilate room with open window until white and dry, the. Scrape residue to hard clean surface, vacuum clean up and seal tub well. Ensure tile grout is seal coated for moisture resistance. Then get 2 more quotes.


2

It is hard to tell if the floor has rot or if that is just mold. If this is just mold confined to the top layer of your osb and the osb seems structurally sound I'd probably: wear a mask, turn the fan on, get a bucket of bleach water and some shop paper towel, wear gloves, aggressively scrub the area with shop towels. I'd probably get a plastic wire brush ...


2

Pour-on is great when you have the ability to move the object around and let the liquid flow around and smoothly and evenly cover the entire surface. It's not so great when you have to move and the object stays still. I doubt you'll be spinning the tub around in all different directions unless you'll have it mounted to a spin table. Spraying will probably be ...


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