53

That is the electrician's courtesy outlet. It is so the electrician can plug in extension cords for lights, saw, drill charger etc. Why? Unlike some novices, pro electricians are well aware that existing houses are chock full of surprises in the electrical wiring. Bootlegged grounds, borrowed neutrals, crossed hots... those and others can result in power ...


33

It looks like a cosmetic DIY patch-job was already attempted before. The current situation is exactly how you can expect your attempt to turn out. This is a structural issue and I would hire a professional. Odds are very high that an entire section of wall will need to be removed and a new wall made of block will be installed. Prepare yourself and your ...


23

Before. I have done both and you can certainly do it either way but it is easier (and cheaper) more sturdy to fasten and shim the bottom to the floor without carpet in the way and because of the carpet you may need to shim more. The only argument for doing it after is "I may hate these bookshelves in a few years and when I tear them down I don't want ...


22

Oh jeez Honestly you overthought all of this. This isn't a bad framing job but it certainly is odd. Why would you want to get rid of a foot of space everywhere. If you leave it like this you certainly need to use it as a secret passageway. Definitely scooby-dooish wall. Choice 1 (preferred) - Move wall cut off or pull all of the top nails and ...


17

I would switch it out for a flush cleanout plug and paint it to match as close as possible. You should not cover or hide it because it is probably for sewer clean-out purposes.


16

You don't even need a drop. Just put boxes in the ceiling, or just below, and plug in. Your standard 6 foot line cord will reach the "relatively low" ceiling from the desktop, and ethernet drop cables are available in any length you like. Use cord/cable loom to "prettify" the cables if it makes you happier. Alternatively, you know where ...


16

It's just a typical floor drain, and it's the ideal place to drain your dehumidifier. What you see is the water trap, which prevents sewer gas from escaping. It presumably connects to your sanitary sewer, so be conscientious about what you dump into it. Here's a modern drain just to illustrate the trap concept: image source


16

Yes, you can cover it up with plywood. However: was made by builder for no reason No, it was for a reason. If it was for no reason, they would have likely just covered it with regular siding. When they went to the extra effort of a proper cover, that's an indication they really intended to make the hole. You just don't know what that reason is. Typically, ...


15

Too much for a comment, so it's going as an answer. There's nothing particularly magical about 16 inch on-center spacing for framing. It's not enshrined as gospel deep down in a building code, for example. It just happens that, at least in the USA, sheet goods like drywall and plywood are dimensioned in 48 x 96 inch sheets (4x8 feet). Since sheet goods need ...


10

Summary... 100% add the duct work. It will be cheaper in long run, look better, and will increase resale value of the home. Few things here: Once you add those walls/ceilings (given it is not a drop ceiling) adding duct work will be very costly and messy. This is sort of like running ethernet cable throughout the house, but air ducts probably have ...


10

The first step of repairing a deteriorated wall is to knock loose and remove the bad materials to the solid base. However, in your case, I suspect there is nothing solid that remains, as the cracks are likely to have penetrated through the thickness of the wall, the removal, and refilling of the defects will require significant efforts, so a professional is ...


8

There are no legitimate products which allow you to stick a conduit on the floor without also adding a layer to the floor to protect it and remove the trip hazard. There are some "put ramps on a lump across the floor" products but they're not rated for permanent installation of AC power lines, and they're all trip hazards. Regardless, I would not ...


7

TL;DR Space heating doesn't make sense in a typical US house that already has duct work in place. There are, broadly speaking, 3 types of home heating in general use in the US: Fossil fuels - Natural gas (generally most cost effective) or oil. If you have this, it would definitely be forced air, as that matches "duct work". Electric resistance ...


6

You are "f'ing" crazy if you think that raising part of your floor is easier than doing some very very minor concrete work. There are all these gotchas for raising a floor and then finishing it so it doesn't look ghetto. Now for doing it right there is breaking concrete, creating a bed for pipe, laying pipe, backfilling, and then adding in ...


6

Sewer pumps are designed for specific uses and their ability to handle different liquids and solids varies hugely. Read the documentation for your specific one. The most common enemies: For all drains, not just pumped ones: Fats that harden when slightly cooled. EG, chicken fat, olive oil. If it's solid in the fridge but liquid when you pour it down the ...


6

Frame the walls first In most basements I've seen (not sure this is a basement but the same principles apply), you put framing up like any other room. This allows you to set straight studs up (doesn't matter how non-plumb your walls are) AND allows adequate room for things like electrical wiring.


5

You need to protect the wire when it comes out of the stud bay. What I would do would be to drill a hole straight up in the center of the 2x4 go up and over to the joist bay. Other options would be to notch the top plate and add a nail plate or sleeve the section with conduit. To me going up through the 2x4 plate of that wall would be the easiest and look ...


5

Barring some of the other issues, like what is holding the hollow block up over the window, and are the bolts through the double ledger going into the core of the hollow block or....I usually smooth out the rough spots with a grinder so all side are flat and reasonably plumb and level. It really needs to be flat. Then I set in place a pressure treated 2X8 ...


5

One thing you could consider would be to install dampers in the duct work to close off various legs of duct. This would allow you to have heat available anywhere in the house you want, but to close off areas from heating when you don't want them to be heated. This would, effectively, give you multiple zones, though they'd be manually controlled. Also, adding ...


5

I tend to answer in practical terms, and not in strictly code-compliant or legal terms. In cases like this, code doesn't really apply since it's old work and you're making improvements. We're only talking two joists, right? That's not so terrible. No, this repair was not done well. Short joist patches only work if they're fastened really well. These aren't. ...


5

The solution is simple, likely just not easy. Find the source of the water and eliminate it. For basements the usual sources are rainwater not being drained away from the foundation walls, or groundwater. With rainwater, your best bet is to ensure that all of your gutters and downspouts are in correct working order and that the downspouts drain in such a ...


5

Your basement is not nearly as sealed as you think. Which is actually a good thing. You need to constantly have make up air. That is air to replace the air you breathe. Otherwise, while your H2O is going down (thanks to the dehumidifier), your O2 is also going down and your CO2 is going up as you breathe. I am not going to do the math, but just think "...


5

If there hadn't been a switch or missing pull-string I would've probably used a Wifi-LED and a wireless motion sensor. You can set a timer on the motion sensor that determines how long the LED should remain on after no motion is detected. The LED can then also be controlled via your phone/tablet/PC. With the right motion sensor, a Raspberry Pi with Home ...


5

Check the light socket carefully for the remnants of a broken pull-string switch. It's extremely unlikely that there's an always-on light in a basement (at least not on purpose anyway). Example of a Leviton R50-08827-CW4 1-Piece Top Wired Lamp Holder with Pull Chain


5

To just answer your question and not debate whether it's the right way or not, use 3/16" x 1-1/4" flat-head Tapcons. You'll need a 5/32" masonry drill bit. Use a regular Phillips screwdriver to screw them into the block and sink them just below the surface of the drywall like you'd do a regular drywall screw.


5

I would guess that its waterproofing paint (e.g. "DryLok", etc.) and contains no asbestos or lead. What protection could a thin layer of "asbestos paint" offer to a concrete wall? Those aren't fibers you're seeing in the paint, they're brush strokes. The crusty, fuzzy material you're seeing behind the paint is mineral accretions. The ...


4

"Professionals" can be idiots too. That serves no purpose and, accordingly, has no code requirement. You can cut it out, move it and all you need to do is ensure you have a check valve near the exit from the sump pump and a long 90 (avoid a hard 90 with a drop like this) to the entrance to the lateral. You should install a clean-out near the exit ...


4

According to the specifications, the legs on the 22C and 24C are both approximately 18" long. You coulld probably put this sink in the location you want with a setup as shown below: You will need to shorten some of the supplied drain assembly pipes so the p-trap is as high up as can be. The part in green is an optional air admittance valve and ...


4

Not sure is this is the best way, but here's what I did in a similar situation. I had a room finished (part of an old garage) that ended by having ~8'2" from the floor to the ceiling (after the ceiling drywall was installed). So I was faced with the same issue as you: Run 10' drywall vertically and cut off 1'10' from each piece. Use 8' or longer ...


4

To close this out, I had a friendly, professional, licensed plumber come out and make the change and it set me back all of $110 + a $20 tip. In retrospect, there was no reason to be concerned about cost and every reason to pay a professional. Sharing this in case it's helpful for someone else facing a similar situation. Editing to add details: The plumber ...


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