14

In a basement, galvanized pipe like that could have been a pipe feeding oil from an underground tank to an oil heater that has long ago been removed and replaced with something else. I had one like that and figured it out by looking at where an old chimney had been removed by looking at the sub-floor structures made to accommodate it. I didn't know exactly ...


12

Yes you can remove them. They are not a complete unit anymore. There was a wire extending from the center of the square disk, you will still see the nib that held the wire. The purpose of the wire was to push one type of insulation or another over it. The insulation was held in place by another disk that grabbed the wire and it would not allow the insulation ...


11

This could be: water waste gas oil for furnace radon system remnants (unlikely) but the earlier ones used metal pipes other The picture is pretty clear, this pipe was installed when they poured the foundation. It does something. You are going to have to open that cap and smell and possibly stick something in there so you can see whats further in. ...


10

Pressure treated "PT" lumber is made for damp areas, where there's moisture and direct contact to concrete or earth. Make sure to use the proper coated anchors for Pressure treated lumber. such as hot-dipped galvanized or stainless steel fasteners. there's more detail about this below.. keep in mind pressure treated is not only a preservative it is also a ...


8

I'd use 3 good ones in an 8 foot run; more if they don't feel solid. (Since it's not structural, all you're really trying to do is hold the wall to the floor and resist any after-the-fact warp/twist issues.)


8

This is so easy, you'll laugh. unfish the cable out of the last segment of conduit pull the conduit off the wall use a conduit bender to put a slight S- curve in the conduit, so it's out from the wall 4.5" more than it was. put the conduit back on the wall fish the cable back in. It will still reach! It is still the same length as the conduit. Now, the ...


8

NEC 300.4(D) covers the type of installation indicated in the question, and it applies to both AC and MC armored cable. So you'll need to use a steel guard at least 1/16" thick to protect the cable. This tip from Fine Homebuilding illustrates this type of installation. Rather than backing the molding with steel plating, they use a U-shaped channel to ...


8

I have galvanized natural gas pipe in my 1950 Metro Detroit house. If it's not oil, it could be gas going to the original furnace location. I can see a bright spot in the floor where something stood for a while. It's common to have the furnace in the middle of the house so the heat is distributed evenly. Removing the cap and smelling is probably your best ...


6

The framing in a basement is non structural. The only weight on the walls is the wall itself and minor loads from shelving, etc. The purpose of Dricore is to isolate everything from the floor and walls except the plastic spacing material on the bottom. Dricore is also installed with a small gap at the walls. If you build on top of the Dricore, the studs are ...


6

You have two issues to contend with. First is that 16 feet is just a bit too tight for two floors. Sure, we usually use 12 inch beams but that's just the structure - you need an actual floor on top and usually a ceiling below. Even if we ignore building codes we will still produce two rather cramped levels. Second is what's actually holding the other end ...


6

You could pin up several runs of Backdrop Drapes along the walls. They come in many colors and are less than $40 for a 10' wall span. You could cut out around the windows and even hang a temporary blind. If you already have all of the electrical installed it would be easy to pull some short extension cords underneath or in between the curtains for TV's. ...


6

I would check with the city. The previous owner may have taken out a building permit for that work and the local building inspector may have blueprints of it.


5

If you have radon, it's already likely getting in--concrete is permeable. So adding a small nail hole isn't going to change anything. Also note that tapcons don't actually penetrate all the way through the slab. If you have radon, you need to get a radon remediation system installed. This will put a hole in your slab so the radon has a place to go (and then ...


5

I'll answer the second question first: Where would I go looking for any such information for my location? Your city's building and code inspector's office. But note that because something is to code doesn't necessarily mean it has to be done that way--provided you can show why your way is better. Which leads to your first question: Does anyone know ...


5

I would NEVER put up plastic on the outside basement wall. All you will do is trap the moisture in the wall and create an environment perfect for mold. Especially with batt or blown insulation behind it. EPS actually breathes water vapor and is better than standard insulation for vapor passage. Moisture from the wall has nowhere to go but through the wall ...


4

From your images it appears you're looking for a polished concrete floor. The process isn't very complicated, but it can be messy and time consuming. It's not unlike refinishing hardwood floors. Ensure floor is suitable for polishing Sources I've seen state that nearly any concrete floor can be polished, so long as it is structurally sound. Floors that are ...


4

You'll have to contact your local building department to be sure, but it's very likely that they'll require a second means of egress. They might also have localized information, on ways others in your area have dealt with the problem. It's not likely that you're the only person in your area that's wanted to add living space to their basement. International ...


4

You could put down a bead of construction adhesive under the sill plate. That will glue it to the tiles. You do need the wall secured somehow because you will not want to be seeing it move around as you finish it out and put said wall into deployment.


4

Or you could buy a ramset that is a powder driven concrete anchor, no drilling is required and would have a minimal effect on the asbestos.


4

If it has a 3/4 inch diameter like you say it's most likely a natural gas line. Don't cut it or gas will fill the basement!! best to turn off the gas and then remove the cap and smell for gas.. You can also have a buddy quickly turn on and off the gas while the cap is off and you can easily confirm that it's a gas line that way.


4

I do mine about every 16 inches.


3

If the exterior of the foundation has the black waterproofing membrane, you're fine to build your framed wall right up to the vinyl blanket insulation in the basement. When I finish basements for my clients, they always ask my opinion. Here it is: I don't like spending money twice. If there is already insulation on the wall the meets the code requirement, ...


3

You can put a vapor/moisture barrier up over rigid foam. A lot of new construction in the far north has this as a default. The idea is that you frame right outside of that. In that framing you are allotting a cavity to which moisture can move and evaporate. Now if you are putting rockwool or other types of insulation in your framing then no you do not ...


3

Assuming you want to do this right and don't mind a little elbow grease. 1) Clean it up Remove the ceramic tile, and strip the floor down to the bare concrete. Technically you don't have to do this, but not doing it is, IMO, just lazy. Building up the floor is convenient but not the best work you can do. 2) Build the base Now that you're down to bare ...


3

The foam insulation itself is combustible, hence the requirement for a thermal barrier. According to the 2012 IRC: R316.4 Thermal barrier. Unless otherwise allowed in Section R316.5 or Section R316.6, foam plastic shall be separated from the interior of a building by an approved thermal barrier of minimum 1/2 inch (12.7 mm) gypsum wallboard or a ...


3

The new information has radically changed my perception of the actual problem. Preventing moisture movement through the foundation won't help. Instead, it is cold temperatures outside causing condensation inside: No matter how well sealed the foundation, the problem will persist. A much less expensive solution may have several parts which can be mixed and ...


3

After a lot of time wandering the faster aisle at my local Ace, I ended up finding a rubber grommet that fit snugly around the 6d nails I am using. I then took the grommet and found a fender washer that fit the grommet inside it (ended up being a 1/2" washer). Then I drilled a hole in the floating bottom plate large enough for the grommet to drop into (...


3

The plumber most likely didn't bring it up because (1) he doesn't know much about the height requirements nor is he required to or (2) he is just there to do the plumbing or a combination of both 1 and 2. Next, basically the general rule is that things like this can be 'grandfathered' in, so long as they aren't touched. Since you were code compliant at the ...


3

I'm surprised no one has mentioned this but based on the statement: I had a french drain installed it seems to me like if you paid someone (assumption here) to install a drain and they left it in a state where it is going to cause a puddle to form before water is able to drain into it, that it should be the company's responsibility at this point. At the ...


3

No standard 50s wooden window frame is supposed to be structural. The rough frame of a window can be, but you don't have one. It doesn't matter. You have a situation that requires a metal lintel. Brace the floor up just to be safe (I wouldn't work under those joists without something), install a lintel and then the window. Avoid lowering the bottom sill ...


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