15

First, handle drainage. If you want to install a sump pump, perimeter drain, or water proof the walls, now is the time to do that. You should also install any plumbing drain lines at this point. Next, framing. Concrete transmits moisture, so use pressure treated, and a styrofoam underlay that would normally go under the sill plate, to keep the walls dry. ...


12

Yes you can remove them. They are not a complete unit anymore. There was a wire extending from the center of the square disk, you will still see the nib that held the wire. The purpose of the wire was to push one type of insulation or another over it. The insulation was held in place by another disk that grabbed the wire and it would not allow the insulation ...


9

Pressure treated "PT" lumber is made for damp areas, where there's moisture and direct contact to concrete or earth. Make sure to use the proper coated anchors for Pressure treated lumber. such as hot-dipped galvanized or stainless steel fasteners. there's more detail about this below.. keep in mind pressure treated is not only a preservative it is also a ...


9

We just redid our basement into 4 rooms on an existing 30 year old house. A playroom, bonus room, laundry room and a bathroom. Most likely you will need to pull a permit to do this type of construction and get it inspected. Bmitch's order is definately correct. How much you want to do is up to you as well as material selection. I did most of the ...


8

Before going through the trouble of an egress window, make sure the water problem is tackled. That, itself, can be a huge chore. And egress window CAN be DIY, but it's going to be a lot of messy work. You need to move a large chunk of soil, cut concrete, install a well, and given the water issues, likely a dry well or drain system of some sort. But yes, ...


8

A couple things to consider. If you have heat ducts in the floor of the upper level (i.e., the basement ceiling), you may be losing heat into the basement; insulating them (and especially sealing any leaks) may prevent heat from being "wasted" by warming the basement. Depending on the floor surface above, insulation may make them a bit more comfortable (...


8

I'd strongly encourage you to consider metal studs instead of wood for a basement finishing project. There are many reasons. I've outlined my conclusion in this question: Should I use steel or wood studs for basement exterior walls? Either way, though, yes, you want to separate the base plate from the bare concrete. With wood, you want something ...


8

I'd use 3 good ones in an 8 foot run; more if they don't feel solid. (Since it's not structural, all you're really trying to do is hold the wall to the floor and resist any after-the-fact warp/twist issues.)


8

This is so easy, you'll laugh. unfish the cable out of the last segment of conduit pull the conduit off the wall use a conduit bender to put a slight S- curve in the conduit, so it's out from the wall 4.5" more than it was. put the conduit back on the wall fish the cable back in. It will still reach! It is still the same length as the conduit. Now, the ...


7

As best I know, a fire rated utility room isn't required by any code for a single family structure. And for multi-family (e.g. condos), this requirement is to isolate each residence from each other and from common/utility areas. So the below advice is completely overkill. For the room itself, you can use fire rated drywall. This is usually 5/8" thick, and ...


7

Another way of attachment is to use the blue Tapcon screws. A hammer drill, hex drill bit, and masonry drill bit(s) are required. I used these on my basement and it was pretty easy (but noisy). I've used the ramset gun (actuated hammer) in the past and I can say the gun is more fun and perhaps easier. Although it makes my significant other very nervous ...


6

The framing in a basement is non structural. The only weight on the walls is the wall itself and minor loads from shelving, etc. The purpose of Dricore is to isolate everything from the floor and walls except the plastic spacing material on the bottom. Dricore is also installed with a small gap at the walls. If you build on top of the Dricore, the studs are ...


6

NEC 300.4(D) covers the type of installation indicated in the question, and it applies to both AC and MC armored cable. So you'll need to use a steel guard at least 1/16" thick to protect the cable. This tip from Fine Homebuilding illustrates this type of installation. Rather than backing the molding with steel plating, they use a U-shaped channel to ...


6

You could pin up several runs of Backdrop Drapes along the walls. They come in many colors and are less than $40 for a 10' wall span. You could cut out around the windows and even hang a temporary blind. If you already have all of the electrical installed it would be easy to pull some short extension cords underneath or in between the curtains for TV's. ...


5

I'll answer the second question first: Where would I go looking for any such information for my location? Your city's building and code inspector's office. But note that because something is to code doesn't necessarily mean it has to be done that way--provided you can show why your way is better. Which leads to your first question: Does anyone know ...


5

Use something impermeable to water to separate the wood from the concrete. Window/Door Flashing tape Sill Gasket Possibilities for securing the wood framing to the floor: Powder Actuated Hammer - a tool which fires a .22 caliber shell loaded with a nail. Tapcon Screws - Pre-drill base plate and concrete and then secure to the floor with Tapcon screwes. ...


5

If you have radon, it's already likely getting in--concrete is permeable. So adding a small nail hole isn't going to change anything. Also note that tapcons don't actually penetrate all the way through the slab. If you have radon, you need to get a radon remediation system installed. This will put a hole in your slab so the radon has a place to go (and then ...


5

You have two issues to contend with. First is that 16 feet is just a bit too tight for two floors. Sure, we usually use 12 inch beams but that's just the structure - you need an actual floor on top and usually a ceiling below. Even if we ignore building codes we will still produce two rather cramped levels. Second is what's actually holding the other end ...


5

I would NEVER put up plastic on the outside basement wall. All you will do is trap the moisture in the wall and create an environment perfect for mold. Especially with batt or blown insulation behind it. EPS actually breathes water vapor and is better than standard insulation for vapor passage. Moisture from the wall has nowhere to go but through the wall ...


4

Anything beyond 5/8" fire rated drywall (which is rated for ~1 hr) is probably overkill, including metal studs. Even 1/2" drywall is rated for ~30 minutes -- in a residential setting I would tend to think it's enough. The most important things: Install a smoke and heat detector, and have it connected to the rest of the alarms in the house so if it's ...


4

You may be able to hang birch- or maple-faced plywood. You can screw it to joists and then unscrew a panel when you need to get in to change stuff. My neighbor used this as a floor, with a urethane coating, but you may be able to skip the finish. I haven't tried this approach myself. YMMV.


4

From your images it appears you're looking for a polished concrete floor. The process isn't very complicated, but it can be messy and time consuming. It's not unlike refinishing hardwood floors. Ensure floor is suitable for polishing Sources I've seen state that nearly any concrete floor can be polished, so long as it is structurally sound. Floors that are ...


4

You'll have to contact your local building department to be sure, but it's very likely that they'll require a second means of egress. They might also have localized information, on ways others in your area have dealt with the problem. It's not likely that you're the only person in your area that's wanted to add living space to their basement. ...


4

You could put down a bead of construction adhesive under the sill plate. That will glue it to the tiles. You do need the wall secured somehow because you will not want to be seeing it move around as you finish it out and put said wall into deployment.


4

Or you could buy a ramset that is a powder driven concrete anchor, no drilling is required and would have a minimal effect on the asbestos.


3

Assuming you want to do this right and don't mind a little elbow grease. 1) Clean it up Remove the ceramic tile, and strip the floor down to the bare concrete. Technically you don't have to do this, but not doing it is, IMO, just lazy. Building up the floor is convenient but not the best work you can do. 2) Build the base Now that you're down to bare ...


3

If there is currently no insulation, the basement is being heated from above. Putting in insulation would thus make the basement somewhat colder, and reduce the heating-costs upstairs. How much depends on how well the basement is insulated from outside. Insulation also helps with soundproofing, if this matters to you or now, depends on what you use the ...


3

The big question is -- what's ugly? the tracks, or the panels? If it's the tracks, I'd go with Jay's answer. If it's the panels, consider putting something other than your standard acoustic tile in. For instance, you could cut down luan into the necessary panel sizes (although I don't know if you'd need to do something to dampen sound with them), or ...


3

If the exterior of the foundation has the black waterproofing membrane, you're fine to build your framed wall right up to the vinyl blanket insulation in the basement. When I finish basements for my clients, they always ask my opinion. Here it is: I don't like spending money twice. If there is already insulation on the wall the meets the code requirement, ...


3

You can put a vapor/moisture barrier up over rigid foam. A lot of new construction in the far north has this as a default. The idea is that you frame right outside of that. In that framing you are allotting a cavity to which moisture can move and evaporate. Now if you are putting rockwool or other types of insulation in your framing then no you do not ...


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