35

When putting a narrow item on a wall hang it level. When putting a wide/long item on the wall hang it parallel to the floor or ceiling, whichever is nearer. The eye can see a picture frame askew because it just doesn't "look right." But something long like a 10 foot long dry erase board, a wide painting.. or trim work like baseboard or crown ...


22

Oh jeez Honestly you overthought all of this. This isn't a bad framing job but it certainly is odd. Why would you want to get rid of a foot of space everywhere. If you leave it like this you certainly need to use it as a secret passageway. Definitely scooby-dooish wall. Choice 1 (preferred) - Move wall cut off or pull all of the top nails and ...


15

Too much for a comment, so it's going as an answer. There's nothing particularly magical about 16 inch on-center spacing for framing. It's not enshrined as gospel deep down in a building code, for example. It just happens that, at least in the USA, sheet goods like drywall and plywood are dimensioned in 48 x 96 inch sheets (4x8 feet). Since sheet goods need ...


14

In a basement, galvanized pipe like that could have been a pipe feeding oil from an underground tank to an oil heater that has long ago been removed and replaced with something else. I had one like that and figured it out by looking at where an old chimney had been removed by looking at the sub-floor structures made to accommodate it. I didn't know exactly ...


12

Yes you can remove them. They are not a complete unit anymore. There was a wire extending from the center of the square disk, you will still see the nib that held the wire. The purpose of the wire was to push one type of insulation or another over it. The insulation was held in place by another disk that grabbed the wire and it would not allow the insulation ...


11

This could be: water waste gas oil for furnace radon system remnants (unlikely) but the earlier ones used metal pipes other The picture is pretty clear, this pipe was installed when they poured the foundation. It does something. You are going to have to open that cap and smell and possibly stick something in there so you can see whats further in. ...


9

NEC 300.4(D) covers the type of installation indicated in the question, and it applies to both AC and MC armored cable. So you'll need to use a steel guard at least 1/16" thick to protect the cable. This tip from Fine Homebuilding illustrates this type of installation. Rather than backing the molding with steel plating, they use a U-shaped channel to ...


9

They don't have to be level, they have to look straight. This can actually get quite complicated when doing tile or vinyl planking (especially those with no underlayment). If you have "rooms" and the basement broken up a bit this shouldn't be a big issue. Try to get trim in one piece for each wall - if it isn't then set each wall and take a ...


8

I'd use 3 good ones in an 8 foot run; more if they don't feel solid. (Since it's not structural, all you're really trying to do is hold the wall to the floor and resist any after-the-fact warp/twist issues.)


8

This is so easy, you'll laugh. unfish the cable out of the last segment of conduit pull the conduit off the wall use a conduit bender to put a slight S- curve in the conduit, so it's out from the wall 4.5" more than it was. put the conduit back on the wall fish the cable back in. It will still reach! It is still the same length as the conduit. Now, the ...


8

I have galvanized natural gas pipe in my 1950 Metro Detroit house. If it's not oil, it could be gas going to the original furnace location. I can see a bright spot in the floor where something stood for a while. It's common to have the furnace in the middle of the house so the heat is distributed evenly. Removing the cap and smelling is probably your best ...


6

You have two issues to contend with. First is that 16 feet is just a bit too tight for two floors. Sure, we usually use 12 inch beams but that's just the structure - you need an actual floor on top and usually a ceiling below. Even if we ignore building codes we will still produce two rather cramped levels. Second is what's actually holding the other end ...


6

You could pin up several runs of Backdrop Drapes along the walls. They come in many colors and are less than $40 for a 10' wall span. You could cut out around the windows and even hang a temporary blind. If you already have all of the electrical installed it would be easy to pull some short extension cords underneath or in between the curtains for TV's. ...


6

I would check with the city. The previous owner may have taken out a building permit for that work and the local building inspector may have blueprints of it.


6

Are these wall studs for your first floor? If so then you need a proper header above the door and double up or triple the 2x6 studs on the outside of the door to support the header. The header should have 3 boards to accommodate the wall thickness. A 2x6 header is probably sufficient but I would go for 2x8 or 2x10 if it doesn't impede head clearance. Better ...


5

If you have radon, it's already likely getting in--concrete is permeable. So adding a small nail hole isn't going to change anything. Also note that tapcons don't actually penetrate all the way through the slab. If you have radon, you need to get a radon remediation system installed. This will put a hole in your slab so the radon has a place to go (and then ...


5

I would NEVER put up plastic on the outside basement wall. All you will do is trap the moisture in the wall and create an environment perfect for mold. Especially with batt or blown insulation behind it. EPS actually breathes water vapor and is better than standard insulation for vapor passage. Moisture from the wall has nowhere to go but through the wall ...


5

Ed Beal's answer covers the core matter. The handle-tie is mandatory, period. So that's the end of that inquiry. You're right that with handle-ties, one will probably trip the other. However FYI that's no guarantee*. However, I agree with keeping bathroom lights off the receptacle circuit. What you might be overlooking is that a) lights and fan are quite ...


4

From your images it appears you're looking for a polished concrete floor. The process isn't very complicated, but it can be messy and time consuming. It's not unlike refinishing hardwood floors. Ensure floor is suitable for polishing Sources I've seen state that nearly any concrete floor can be polished, so long as it is structurally sound. Floors that are ...


4

You'll have to contact your local building department to be sure, but it's very likely that they'll require a second means of egress. They might also have localized information, on ways others in your area have dealt with the problem. It's not likely that you're the only person in your area that's wanted to add living space to their basement. International ...


4

After a lot of time wandering the faster aisle at my local Ace, I ended up finding a rubber grommet that fit snugly around the 6d nails I am using. I then took the grommet and found a fender washer that fit the grommet inside it (ended up being a 1/2" washer). Then I drilled a hole in the floating bottom plate large enough for the grommet to drop into (...


4

You could put down a bead of construction adhesive under the sill plate. That will glue it to the tiles. You do need the wall secured somehow because you will not want to be seeing it move around as you finish it out and put said wall into deployment.


4

Or you could buy a ramset that is a powder driven concrete anchor, no drilling is required and would have a minimal effect on the asbestos.


4

After explaining this to the AHJ, he proposed running NM in conduit around the back side of the wall. This took some creative bending (me being a first time conduit bender, at least), but the end result is solid and passed rough electrical inspection:


4

You can retrofit just ground. Really. The biggest misconception is that you must replace all the wires. Nope! NEC has allowed you to retrofit grounds on feeders and larger circuits for awhile, and it worked so well that in NEC 2014 they threw it open to all circuits. This is an exception because ground is special. Normally, it's a fixed rule that ...


4

If it has a 3/4 inch diameter like you say it's most likely a natural gas line. Don't cut it or gas will fill the basement!! best to turn off the gas and then remove the cap and smell for gas.. You can also have a buddy quickly turn on and off the gas while the cap is off and you can easily confirm that it's a gas line that way.


4

I do mine about every 16 inches.


3

The foam insulation itself is combustible, hence the requirement for a thermal barrier. According to the 2012 IRC: R316.4 Thermal barrier. Unless otherwise allowed in Section R316.5 or Section R316.6, foam plastic shall be separated from the interior of a building by an approved thermal barrier of minimum 1/2 inch (12.7 mm) gypsum wallboard or a ...


3

If the exterior of the foundation has the black waterproofing membrane, you're fine to build your framed wall right up to the vinyl blanket insulation in the basement. When I finish basements for my clients, they always ask my opinion. Here it is: I don't like spending money twice. If there is already insulation on the wall the meets the code requirement, ...


3

You can put a vapor/moisture barrier up over rigid foam. A lot of new construction in the far north has this as a default. The idea is that you frame right outside of that. In that framing you are allotting a cavity to which moisture can move and evaporate. Now if you are putting rockwool or other types of insulation in your framing then no you do not ...


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