New answers tagged

2

The reason you need to cut off power when replacing a thermostat is to prevent the wires from touching each other in the process of disconnecting and reconnecting all of them. Assuming it is using 24VAC control (you need to measure it to make sure it's not high voltage), you are not in danger of getting shocked, but if the wrong wires touch each other, it ...


0

Some of these mouldings can be recreated by multiple router bits -- your run the top half through one router bit and the bottom half through another router bit. Bottom could be made by a triple bead router head, and the other half is a fairly standard profile -- possibly a cove, but hard to determine from your picture. Going to a specialty woodworking ...


1

That baseboard radiation will work great on a 2 pipe steam system or a forced hot water heating system but is not recommended for use on a 1 pipe steam system.


0

Lots of possibility’s here, bad thermostat, bad heater . But more information is needed. Are these 120 or 240v heaters? Is the thermostat single pole or double pole (2 connections or 4) ? I have seen where a single double pole thermostat is controlling 2 heaters on both 120v and 240v , I have also seen 1 welded contact set and 1 burned open, so it could be ...


3

Baseboard typically goes in before padded carpeting and after commercial carpeting or carpet tiles. The reason is because padded carpeting can be easily and neatly tucked under base trim, and it's more difficult to install base trim at a uniform height over padded carpeting. On the other hand, you want your base to be down snug against low-pile commercial ...


3

You could do it either way. I probably would not put carpet in a laundry room as that area is more subject to spills, like a kitchen, and it’s harder to clean up detergent or water from carpet than vinyl, but...if you choose it, then: there are advantages to either order. The carpet tiles may need trimming and putting the baseboard on last will cover the ...


3

Just a short line from another Transpondian [UK here] In the UK most older houses are brick & plaster. Only newer [& cheaper] constructions use what the US would call 'drywall', any decent modern build would use concrete 'cinder-block' & plaster so this is a very common situation. Mounting on any trim, such as skirting, panelling or architrave ...


2

Yes those shallow boxes were ok once upon a time with the wires closer than allowed today. Today because of the 1-1/4” requirement most use conduit. I will use smurf tube or non metallic flexible tubing concealed in walls with shallow boxes this requires the splices or feeds to other devices to be made in a different location that will have enough volume ...


3

Surface mount of some sort - "ugly plastic channelling" being only one of many sorts. Tasteful wood trim being the most easily accessed for a DIY less ugly / less modern-looking solution. One reason you probably can't find those boxes would be that they are not going to have adequate space to meet code box fill requirements (and that's not a particularly ...


9

I see two options. What I see in the US quite a bit is instead of running the plastic channels on the wall surface, people will use steel conduit. It gives kind of a rustic/industrial look. Receptacles would then be mounted in steel boxes on the wall surface as well. What is typical in Germany, where most walls are block and plaster, is that grooves are cut ...


Top 50 recent answers are included