49

Since the pole is so thick and there's only one of them, it could have been the base of a satellite dish - like one of the old 8' dishes (big, not sure of exact measurements). The height is about right for that, and it's kinda short for a clothesline. It filling with water is just from the rain. I've never seen anything plumbing or well related that looks ...


23

My vote is that it is for a clothes line/rack. Water is just accumulated over the years from rain. Example 1: Example 2:


15

This could be part of a larger yard drainage system. It could let water from the screened end of the pipe drain out into some buried drain field. It could also drain onto a deep buried french drain construction consisting of a sizeable hole that was filled with crushed rock or similar. The fact that the part of the pipe that has the screen is working its ...


14

Looks like a rain gutter or sump pump outlet. Place a noisy device directed into it and walk around and listen. You could probably bury the white pipe and just leave the grille exposed, flush with the lawn.


13

"Landscape Timber" or, sometimes, "used railroad tie" - but "landscape timber" is what you'll find at most typical lumber suppliers. They will typically last several years - if well pressure-treated, longer. It's hard to know if they are really well pressure-treated until they start failing and you look at a calendar to figure out how long it's been. ...


12

Put them in the grill and get them HOT! Then use a wire brush and scrub the scale and rust off. After that I usually coat them with olive oil but any cooking oil will work.


8

It's an NDS Pro pop-up drainage emitter http://www.ndspro.com/catalog/category/view/s/pop-up-emitters/id/227/ I took the approach of noticing the acronym on the cap, figuring out what company it was and seeing which of their products match.


8

Remnant of a basketball pole, maybe?


8

They are probably additional clean-out-points - my local inspector wants one every 50 feet (15 meters) along the line. But my comment that you should ask the people who put them in, who would know, stands as the correct way to figure that out. If so, they should remain accessible, but be protected from sunlight, as they appear to be PVC. You can paint them ...


7

Soak them overnight in vinegar. It works like magic to remove rust. Afterwards rub them with oil or they will get rusty again.


7

Excellent electrolysis results: You need: One rusty grill grate. A plastic container. Some DC power source. An iron plate (NB pure iron, NOT stainless steel!). Sodium hydroxide, NaOH (alternatively sodium carbonate, Na2CO3). Rubber gloves. Instructions: Put the grill grate inside the container making sure that it is not lying flat on the bottom but have ...


6

Look for a cleanout. That's a pipe sticking up out of the ground with a plug. That might give you a general idea where the tank is or at least what side of the house its on. The tank will usually be a short distance from the cleanout. See if there are plans that were filed with the local government when the house was built. For example, mine are with the ...


6

Use a soil probe. Commonly used item for plumbers and landscapers:


5

My recommendation is to not put in the patio. Your efforts may lower the value to the buyer rather than raising it, especially if what you're planning to put in is the "easiest, lowest cost patio" rather than a landscaping masterpiece. Like many kinds of projects, you will almost never get a financial return from the work and investment unless: you ...


4

I would refrain from using that type of fastener. I believe it will allow a lot of movement. I made a sketch to show what I have made before, many years ago. It does not have any hangers just angled notches that allow the legs to fit tightly and notches that act as a setting for the beam to bear on. A single bolt will draw it all together, or two could be ...


4

The most reasonable low-labor suggestion for a homeowner is an angle grinder with a wire cup. It's a moderately priced tool that will likely be useful for something else down the road. A no labor solution is electrolysis, which will pull the rust off. However it involves an electrical source, water, and home-made wiring so you should be somewhat ...


4

In my area, they often build homes that have an optional deck, but the deck is not built at the same time as the home. In these cases, the home builders simply build a small section of railing, and attach it directly in front of the door. In your case, you will not be able to open the doors (since the railing will prevent it). In the case of sliding doors, ...


4

The answer is RAILROAD TIES. The timbers in your photo are Railroad Ties. The railroad will change the ties on a regular basis. They are impregnated with creosote and as a result they are very heavy. In Alaska the railroad will give the old ones away for free occasionally. I have built retaining walls with them. For the purpose of your fire pit area they ...


4

Paint is the best way to encapsulate asbestos, I am trying to figure out what part you believe is asbestos. The fence looks to have a metal roofing or siding, the wall in the back of the photo looks like corrugated fiberglass, if corrugated fiberglass I would not paint it without permission as it may be letting light in (we do this in our barns, The ...


4

Does the fence need to be solid for privacy? If not, consider a chain-link fence. You set the poles, unroll the fencing along and attach it to the poles with wire clips, then if you want to avoid having it sag, you run a pipe or just a thick wire along the top through eyes on the tops of the poles. When you get to the end, you rent a come-along fence puller ...


3

With the narrower angle (15), they add cross supports. The wider angle (30) is given with no supports. Making a stable swing set is no joke. Unless it is part of a larger structure that weighs it down, the legs need to be anchored in concrete. When I was a kid I used flimsy backyard swing sets and could easily rock the whole swing set, frame and all, back ...


3

The angle is not particularly important. With sufficient ground stability and fastening, you could do it with a zero angle: a beam supported by a pair of posts. For each configuration with a greater angle, the need for strength in the supports and anchoring decreases. When the angle is 180 degrees, the system is completely stable without any anchors at ...


3

Rather than removing it, I would suggest covering it properly with greenhouse film (translucent plastic, UV-protected with typically 4 year guaranteed lifespan, typically 11-13 cents per square foot) rather than a blue tarp. With proper edge attachments it will be much more secure and weather tight, and far less unsightly as well. You could also use (at ...


3

Plant desirable native shrubs and vines that would grow over the irregular surface and transform it into an aesthetically pleasing feature. You might have to add soil to fill voids, and you could mix leaves into this soil for fill. You could put up a barn owl box to entice one or a pair to live there and provide natural rat control. If you don't have barn ...


2

I finished digging it up. It was just an oval piece of concrete (about 3 inch deep) that had the edges wrapped with metal. 0_0 so I guess trash is the closest answer. Wish I knew what it was t here for...it seemed deliberately placed.


2

Yeah a solid wall will be best, but for what it's worth, if you are considering plants, go hedges. Besides hedges, generally, look for evergreens so that the sound will be blocked in winter, too. I think bamboo is also good, but it usually requires a lot of maintenance because it likes to spread. Also a water fountain (maybe for a koi pond) can help drown ...


2

Foliage won't do much unless it's very dense and a fairly wide strip--say 50 feet thick or more. Instead, you'll need to look to solid-panel fencing to block and deflect sound energy. The problem is likely that there are other homes nearby, which will reflect sound from several directions. You may not be able to accomplish significant noise abatement with ...


2

I would use the 4X8. If I had not seen the recommendation that you have posted, that is what I would have suggested. The round pipe is not suited for the support of weight. "I beams" and such are. The round pipe where the swing will be attached has a high potential the colapse. The round pipe can work if a truss configuration would be made of it, which ...


2

I have not had a good experience with tilling an existing lawn. The existing grass does not get shredded completely but will form lumps that make for an uneven surface. Depending on how much top soil you have, you may bring out a lot of sand and rocks. Even a small electric tiller can go as deep as 6-8 inches. If your top soil is not at least 12 inches, it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible