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33

Those are 5-pin male DIN connectors. Same as used in the original IBM-PC keyboard cables. From the photo this is obviously a patch cable of some kind for an audio application. Here are some typical wiring schemes: (Shields are connected to pin 2) 5 pin Male cord Mt. 180 degree, Din Connector (Amazon)


24

This is common on old audio equipment in Europe: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DIN_connector#Analog_audio Though your equipment could be wired differently, so it's worth checking carefully with a multimeter to avoid possible damage. It's unlikely that the record player had an amplifier, so it wasn't meant to connect directly to speakers. You've use this ...


13

Still alive and kicking, as a MIDI connector, albeit with only 3 pins connected - the three central ones. Be aware that there are three sorts of 5 pin DIN plug/sockets - 180 degree, as you have, and 270 degree, for much the same uses, and domino, with a central pin, impossible to get them mixed up when plugging in.


6

There is a discussion of stranded vs. solid wire for speaker cable here. The consensus (or at least the weight of opinions) seems to be that there is a theoretical difference, but no practical difference. Speaker wire is also called lamp cord. It is basically parallel stranded wire in either 16 or 18 gauge. The lower number indicates the thicker wire. 16 ...


5

These are called Bullet connectors. They're used as a male/female pair, and allow for quick, repeated connection and disconnection of a circuit. They can be found at any automotive supply store, and some hardware stores. If you won't need to disconnect and reconnect the wires, you can simply cut the connector off, strip the wire, and use whatever other type ...


5

If you can run wiring to the rooms easily, I'd recommend going with the centralized stack-of-amplifiers approach. It's very cheap, easy to set up, probably has the best sound quality, and is the most reliable. IR repeaters Start by placing all the stereo receivers in a centralized location (I picked the laundry room). Then, install an IR receiver ...


5

Yes there are guidelines for how to place the speakers. E.g. here is a Dolby 5.1 placement guide. But the short answer is A, B, C, F, and E in your diagram, if you have to pick from those exact spots. Also note that some higher-end stereos have a calibration feature that will use a microphone and test tones to detect the placement of each individual speaker,...


4

Most likely, there are holes in the side of the shaft. Put the wires through the holes and tighten down the ring to hold it in place.


4

Googling "acoustically transparent fabric" returns a variety of companies that provide materials that advertise the characteristics you require. For example: https://fabricmate.com/fabric/acoustic-fabrics/ or https://www.audimute.com/what-is-acoustic-fabric Transparent cloth is available but putting a picture on it is another challenge. The printing ...


3

Bang and Olufsen equipment were designed to work together very closely, ie, connecting your turntable to tape deck to the receiver allowed the receiver to control the turntable and tape deck directly. Pressing turntable on the remote would power up the receiver and turntable and switch the receiver the the turntable input. This was enabled by having control ...


3

This could be a bunch of problems, from a missing ground to a voltage spike, to dying speakers, etc... First of all, it would be helpful to rule in/out the computer as the source of the popping. It's possible your computer's sound card is not great and is sending those noises to the speaker, which is faithfully playing them. Try plugging the speakers into a ...


3

Placement of speakers for a surround sound system can get very specific if you care about it. By far the most important speakers are the front 3 (center, left and right). The center channel is the most important for movies because most of the dialog comes from the center speaker. Left/right speakers are more important for music but still used a lot in ...


3

If (as seems likely, but you don't tell us what TV you have) the HDMI on the TV is (are) all inputs, you will have to use optical (or some other audio - coaxial digital, for instance) output. If the TV has HDMI outputs, you might be able to rig something where one of those goes to an input on the reciver, but that might not work with having the picture on ...


3

OTA DTV antenna cable is commonly RG6 (replaced RG59). This is a 75 ohm coaxial cable with an F or BNC termination (probably F). The better quality component video cables use 3 separate RG6 cables with RCA connectors at the end. They are simply attached together in a bundle. My original answer assumed this is what you had. With the picture you've added it ...


3

Those are connections for speakers. They are not amplified. To use a normal headphone signal (3.5 mm) with them, you will need an amplifier between your device and the wall connections. Basically, you'd have two two-conductor wires going to the binding posts. The wires can connect 2 different ways: They can simply stripped of insulation at the end, ...


2

Comment converted to answer A 16/14 cap should take between 1 and 4 #16 wires, but it depends on the cap. Specific information should be available on the packaging, or from the manufacturer.


2

Tile setters use carbide tipped nibblers to trim tiles by small amounts. You would need to have access to the back of the edge you want to trim off so you can grab it with the trimmers. You take small bites, clip clip clip, until you have removed what you need to. There is still the possibility of cracking the tile, but this is your best bet for trimming ...


2

COAX to 3.5mm Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


2

COAX to RCA adapter You could get a "Y" adapter but it doesn't matter because you are getting mono. The Y would just split the mono in two. For stereo it is doable but the only thing I know is S/PDIF - so search for a COAX to S/PDIF adapter. Either way I wouldn't spend a lot of money on adapters. You are getting mediocre end product no matter what ...


2

I'd try a AA battery first to reduce the current going through the speaker, but it should still be audible. You'll need a helper to stand by one of the speakers and listen for static or a clicking noise. Just take one cable coming out of the wall, and short each combination of wires across the battery in turn until you hear a click or static at the speaker:...


2

I was just told recently by someone who took a class on something involving building sound absorption panels, that recycled denim material makes an excellent sound deadener. He said to wrap the bats of denim in speaker material and hang them an inch or so away from the wall to kill echo or noise from another room. Good luck with your home theater.


2

You can get the audio out of your stereo but you cannot avoid at least one non-HDMI audio connection. Option 1: Follow the method in the OEM Manual Along with each HDMI input install a digital or analog audio input. Analog inputs are automatically associated with a device (DVD, DVR) but digital inputs must be associated with a device (p. 42 in manual). ...


2

Coax Cable has a particular shielding and is designed for the frequencies that will be carried on it. Your Composite wire does not have that design so your signal will be degraded and quite possibly to the point where you can not get a decent signal.


2

I would definitely not hang something that heavy on the ceiling without anchoring it into a rafter. The constant weight will inevitably cause the ceiling to sag, especially if is only 1/2" drywall. I would advise adding more wood framing between the rafters and mounting the speaker to that. Do you have a picture of the speaker and mounting bracket?


2

These are binding posts These are binding-post connections -- you can connect stripped wire ends to them by screwing the stripped end down under the turning (nut) portion of the binding post, or use standard (4mm) banana plugs on the ends of your speaker leads that then plug into the socket in the middle of the binding post.


2

If I understand what you're doing, you want to put the chromecast on the projector on the ceiling, and use two of the RGB to run the audio out back to the receiver. Yes, it will work, I have done this many times to re-purpose cables installed in home theater and commercial AV. The RGB cables for component video (RGB) and composite video (yellow) are just ...


1

You should put a meter on them and check the impedance. You could also pull a pair of speakers to see how they are wired. Ceiling speakers are not an "audiophile stereo sound" setup, typically - they are designed to cover a large area so you can hear the sound all over the house (or area they cover.) Two typical (hardly the only) ways you might get what ...


1

You would do fine using simple burlap. Given the wavelengths of the signal that must pass through, cotton fibers will pose no problem. They are also considerably smaller than the coarse fibers found in commercial acoustic panels. In fact, any material used as speaker cover would work for your application. Incidentally, fiberglass is a very hard and ...


1

Use an external tuner/switcher/amplifier.


1

I'm afraid that it's more of a hardware question, but I'm offering you a DIY answer :) How about light instead of sound? Install some simple fixture on the wall (or desk) where you are sitting (beside the PC?) most often, put the red bulb (or whatever color you like and can make you notice easily). The wiring shouldn't be hard to guess, but if you're not ...


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