Hot answers tagged

11

I live in Florida too so I know exactly what you mean about hot attics. I had the same problem except for the pvc water pipes. I put up a number of 2 by 8 feet of 3/4 inch plywood on the rafters. Where it was possible to move over some of the cables, I did it. where I couldn't move them, I took some 2x4's, notched them for the wires to go thru and put them ...


9

The biggest issue you have venting into the attic is warm, moist air being blown into a somewhat closed area (aside from the grease and particles you have a filter for). If the attic space you vent into is large, and has good ventilation this shouldn't be an issue. If you have to vent into a small portion of the attic and it looks like the moist air will ...


6

I've been in no less than 300 attics and every one of then has had dust, grey dust, in them. Your attic has soffits installed to vent the attic. You also have vent pipes going through the roof to vent caps that allow some backdraft into the attic. If you've ever had your roof redone, stuff will be knocked down. Mold needs a fare amount of moisture and most ...


5

As mentioned in a comment, those are not listed to be used for electrical cables. If you are just running one cable in one run, just use regular NM cable staples like these: If you are running multiple cables and would like to save some time, you can use "stackers" like these: If you added another 2x4 to the side of the members that run perpendicular to ...


4

If you want future-proof, run conduit You simply need to comply with conduit rules, which can be a bit tricky since it's not normal to run cables through conduit. Four cables (circuits) per conduit, no more. It's a pain to pull it through. Individual THHN wires are much easier, but you're not allowed to unjacket cable to run it through conduit. (the ...


4

This sounds like an issue from a physical damage standpoint While the NM cable only needs to be protected by guard strips if it's within 6' of a scuttle hole in your case, as per NEC 320.23(A) (referred to by NEC 334.23): (A) Cables Run Across the Top of Floor Joists. Where run across the top of floor joists, or within 2.1 m (7 ft) of the floor or ...


4

That duct is not done properly notice how the duct is collapsed. Webbing can be used I have used plumbers tape (a metal strip with holes) at the first support after a rise I will screw a saddle of scrap ductwork to keep the duct from collapsing. I have used webbing but always think it will separate over time I usually melt the holes to reduce the chance of ...


4

It looks like it is on top of a wall so it is being used as a nailer. I believe that is why.


4

I doubt that it is asbestos but I would have it tested to be sure. It looks like the pouring wool that my father-in-law used in his attic back in the 1960's


3

In the 60’s all the roofing I put down we used roofing felt 90 lb per roll. Some people call tar paper it is heavy and black and makes a good barrier. I would be guessing since we don’t know what your original vent system was or is now, but with some homes we did just prior to my knees saying no more roof jobs we had to add vents or a complete ridge vent ...


3

I'm not an expert in this area but this is what I would do. If the ceiling joists are only 2x4s I would not use batts that are higher than the joists themselves and then run the additional batts perpendicular. This would leave a significant gap allowing hot/cold area to infiltrate from the sides. I would just put in the R13 in the empty bays and then run the ...


3

I service thousands of smoke detectors every year and they should NEVER be installed in an attic. There are reasons code does not require them in attics but code is a MINIMUM requirement. If you want to provide additional protection for attic exposure the proper device is a heat detector. Smoke detectors are not designed to function in the high temperatures ...


3

Probably fine as far as weight goes. But I would not nail it, I would use construction screws (aka "deck screws") Pounding nails into the sides of those rafters may disturb your roof sheeting nails and or shingles, leading to leaks.


3

The j boxes need to be accessible if you can get in the attic even with a ladder they are accessible. Nailed or screwed down to the rafters is fine I like to run rat boards when traveling perpendicularly to the rafters that way they are supported if stepped on. Running parallel I staple them to the side 1-1/4” down the side. The insulation won’t be a problem....


3

Every stick built house has mold of some type. I have worked in construction since the 70’s and well as a gopher 60’s , I currently work in a lumber mill , the boards are sprayed with a fungicide , plywood when I worked in that plant I could not believe how fast the “mushrooms” and other fungus grew on the edges of the veneer prior to being assembled. So don’...


3

There are many kinds of engineers and most are specialists like: civil (water, sewer, drainage, etc.); structural; mechanical (plumbing? HVAC, etc.); electrical; acoustical; etc. Architects know building components like: windows, stairs, doors, roofing, etc. plus they know code issues like required setbacks, energy use (insulation, vapor barriers, etc.). ...


2

When I've replaced motors in the past I replace with the exact part if you went with that approach you shouldn't have to worry about clearances but it would be painful to work within that constrained space. It doesn't look like this fan is designed for serviceability from the inside but there are a lot of things like that so it doesn't surprise me that ...


2

If the existing joists are adequate to support an attic floor, it will be far easier to replace the recessed can lights with wafer style LED lights such as these from Lithonia. When shopping, check carefully to see that the lights you select will work out with the openings in your ceiling. You might want to bring one of the trims from your existing ...


2

Similar to @paul's answer to your first question, but some additional information taken from this: If header spans a space less than 4ft, a single header can be used (as opposed to double), and it can be end nailed to the trimmer joists. If header spans 4ft or more, headers and trimmers must be doubled. Doubled trimmer joists must be nailed together with ...


2

I'd go with a "stacker" or "tree" style of NM holder If I was trying to provision for the future in your situation, but a full conduit system (vs. cables in conduit) was out of the question, then I would use a "stacker" or "tree" style of NM holder that nails to the bottom of the joist and spaces the cables apart in its clips, such as the Bridgeport NMWH-43 ...


2

When I replaced a closed box recirculating bath fan with a large exhaust fan, I let the local hardware store owner convince me it was adequate to vent the bath fan into the attic because (he said) “the ridge vent would adequately exhaust all the bathroom air.” BIGGEST MISTAKE WE EVER MADE. By the dry winter season our ceilings all separated from the tops of ...


2

The alternative to Eric Simpson's simple solution is a product like the following. (This particular one is from Amazon, but searching for "loft flooring legs" will find many like it.) Plywood/chipboard is often sold in 2400x600mm (8'x2') sheets precisely for fitting through a hatch to floor a loft. Also, beware! Roof trusses are usually designed down to a ...


2

Your fan is wired in series with the lights When the person installed the fan, the wires that he needed (hot and neutral) simply were not available in the box he wanted to tap. So he did something crazy like tap across a light switch (hot and switched-hot). Anyway, there's a reason he did it that way: doing it the right way was too difficult. So you ...


2

You have several issues: 1) hold the insulation in place, 2) vapor barrier, 3) vent space above the insulation 1) I’ve seen string installed across the joists to keep the insulation from falling down. They usually install it about 6” apart at the ends of the batts and about 12” - 16” apart elsewhere. You can staple the string to the bottom of the joists. ...


2

Blown in insulation fills the cracks better. For that reason, as a second layer it has big advantages. Downside: You have to borrow/rent the blower, which, if you are in my situation, you need to plan two trips to the hardware store an hour away. Upside: Blown insulation goes in very fast. My stepson and I did one section of my house, 28 x 40 feet in about ...


2

Easiest way to protect them is to fasten a board to the floor/joists on either side. I would paint the boards a contrasting colour so they are highly visible. Slightly harder, but probably even safer would be to split 1.5" waste pipe in half lay it over the pipe, and secure it with pipe hanger tape (metal pipe with a hole per inch)on either side.


2

I don't see any darkening on the braces, rafters, or underside of the roof deck, as I would expect if you had that much mold. It looks like plain dust to me.


2

Yes you can you will need to frame in the opening to the existing framework, I would suggest new work in this case to be larger or thicker as today’s wood is total crap compared to your construction. What I mean if you have 2x6 in that old wood I would go with 2x8 or 4x6 ,, sounds funny but count the rings on your boards and today’s boards will be 1/3 to 1/4 ...


2

This is a subjective question which depends on your prerogative for several things. How long will you stay in the home (or what's your predilection for saving the planet)? Better venting may keep the attic cooler, which may in turn reduce air conditioning costs (financial and ecological). The payoff (in time and pollution savings) isn't clear without a ...


2

If you have wires/cables that run across the top of the attic floor joists, you could build up the joist with ripped 2x4's that would provide another 1-1/2 inch clearance above the joists for the wires. You would have to provide a gap between the added sections of wood to provide a channel for the wires to lay in. Or lay 2x4's flat perpendicular to the ...


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