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26

Almost certainly a vent for plumbing. It connects to the sewer, so it doesn't need a cap. It's highly likely there's a sink or other fixture nearly below it.


10

It's a vent pipe for the plumbing it connects eventually to the sewer. It will catch a small amount of rain but the rain will stay inside the pipe and eventually reach the sewer. You're probably not supposed to put rain into the sewer but this pipe catches such a small amount of rain that nobody cares.


9

The biggest issue you have venting into the attic is warm, moist air being blown into a somewhat closed area (aside from the grease and particles you have a filter for). If the attic space you vent into is large, and has good ventilation this shouldn't be an issue. If you have to vent into a small portion of the attic and it looks like the moist air will ...


7

The load will be transferred to the supports mostly based on how you stack it, not how the sheets are laid. OSB has a dedicated (and labeled) strength axis. It's normally lengthwise with the sheet. While your OSB may be thick enough that it doesn't much matter, it's almost never appropriate to run it parallel to the joists. If you don't have a compelling ...


6

I've been in no less than 300 attics and every one of then has had dust, grey dust, in them. Your attic has soffits installed to vent the attic. You also have vent pipes going through the roof to vent caps that allow some backdraft into the attic. If you've ever had your roof redone, stuff will be knocked down. Mold needs a fare amount of moisture and most ...


6

I've run into this often and have become very successful at getting into corners of the attic I never thought I'd be able to. Sometimes you have to flat crawl on the joists. What has also worked is cutting out a square in the wall inside the room at the ceiling height and using that as a pull station. You will probably have to drill through a sill plate but ...


6

Good choice on the antenna. Lots of high quality reception for free. In fact, OTA (over the air) TV signals are often of better digital quality than TV through cable distribution. Cable TV is compressed/decompressed one more stage, to reduce the digital data rate, squeeze more channels, and make more money. And OTA latency is lower: you will cheer for a goal ...


4

It looks like it is on top of a wall so it is being used as a nailer. I believe that is why.


4

I service thousands of smoke detectors every year and they should NEVER be installed in an attic. There are reasons code does not require them in attics but code is a MINIMUM requirement. If you want to provide additional protection for attic exposure the proper device is a heat detector. Smoke detectors are not designed to function in the high temperatures ...


4

I doubt that it is asbestos but I would have it tested to be sure. It looks like the pouring wool that my father-in-law used in his attic back in the 1960's


4

That duct is not done properly notice how the duct is collapsed. Webbing can be used I have used plumbers tape (a metal strip with holes) at the first support after a rise I will screw a saddle of scrap ductwork to keep the duct from collapsing. I have used webbing but always think it will separate over time I usually melt the holes to reduce the chance of ...


4

The only answer for removal of those angle 2x4s is no, it is not possible at all unless a major reinforcement of the ceiling and roof is done. The members that make up the roof are set so they work together as a whole, and to remove one part will severely weaken the whole truss that the piece was removed from. Remove one piece from more than one truss, you ...


4

You got the right idea but all those wires and splices in a 4"box will be tough. If there's no slack, the existing cable will only be 2" into the box on each side. Think about using two 4" boxes and connect them together with a 2" nipple or piece of EMT. That will give you plenty of room to work with. You'll be running and splicing 14'2 with ground. Your ...


4

Last place I'd put one, as a network/wiring pro. Basements (off the floor/above flood levels) are good, attics not so much, and anywhere you plan to inhabit is usually a poor choice (the noise gets very tedious very quickly.) Thus, an attic that you think will be cool enough because you'll convert it to a room that you will use is still not a good choice. ...


3

I have the same issue in my garage. I had the attic truss setup for storage with just enough head room to bend over and walk. Nails showing everywhere. I think I will by some cheap long rolls of chicken wire to staple on the bottom of the roof rafters. This will keep me from causing injury to my head but will still allow air to flow under shingles


3

The j boxes need to be accessible if you can get in the attic even with a ladder they are accessible. Nailed or screwed down to the rafters is fine I like to run rat boards when traveling perpendicularly to the rafters that way they are supported if stepped on. Running parallel I staple them to the side 1-1/4” down the side. The insulation won’t be a problem....


3

Every stick built house has mold of some type. I have worked in construction since the 70’s and well as a gopher 60’s , I currently work in a lumber mill , the boards are sprayed with a fungicide , plywood when I worked in that plant I could not believe how fast the “mushrooms” and other fungus grew on the edges of the veneer prior to being assembled. So don’...


3

There are many kinds of engineers and most are specialists like: civil (water, sewer, drainage, etc.); structural; mechanical (plumbing? HVAC, etc.); electrical; acoustical; etc. Architects know building components like: windows, stairs, doors, roofing, etc. plus they know code issues like required setbacks, energy use (insulation, vapor barriers, etc.). ...


3

Each lead coming into a box must have enough cable sheath to get onto the clamp and 1/4" past the clamp (more is better for marking purposes). And then the wires inside the box must continue beyond the sheath for 6" minimum. You can't do it the way you propose, unless the box is 14" long lol. When you want to mid-splice like that, your better bet is 2 ...


3

You may want to consider an NEC 334.40(B) compliant splice kit, like a NSi NMT-2 splice. https://images.homedepot-static.com/catalog/pdfImages/49/4927386c-f90e-4fc6-b8ae-6d113682d82a.pdf


3

In my personal experience, a "real vent" on top of the roof (cupola, turbine, etc) is far more effective than continuous ridge vent, and I will in fact be retrofitting a cupola onto a roof with continuous ridge vent for exactly that reason. The space feels nearly unvented, despite "being vented" as the air movement through the ridge vent (...


3

I would be using position 3 as position 5 is close to the window being that high up it will not be a problem for the condenser and compressor unit for your AC / heat pump I would agree the other 3 positions 2 at the vent would allow the moisture to be sucked into the attic space and the one over the window is two close as #5 is to 2 windows so I would say #3 ...


2

Blown in cellulose can be quite effective if all air gaps are located and sealed with expanding foam for this purpose. Look for gaps around light boxes/electrical, fan vents, and those in corners. Unless sealed, you'll lose heating and waste money. If the previous fiberglass batts had dark marks, they generally indicate an air leak. You can lay insulation ...


2

If the existing joists are adequate to support an attic floor, it will be far easier to replace the recessed can lights with wafer style LED lights such as these from Lithonia. When shopping, check carefully to see that the lights you select will work out with the openings in your ceiling. You might want to bring one of the trims from your existing ...


2

Similar to @paul's answer to your first question, but some additional information taken from this: If header spans a space less than 4ft, a single header can be used (as opposed to double), and it can be end nailed to the trimmer joists. If header spans 4ft or more, headers and trimmers must be doubled. Doubled trimmer joists must be nailed together with ...


2

Yes you can you will need to frame in the opening to the existing framework, I would suggest new work in this case to be larger or thicker as today’s wood is total crap compared to your construction. What I mean if you have 2x6 in that old wood I would go with 2x8 or 4x6 ,, sounds funny but count the rings on your boards and today’s boards will be 1/3 to 1/4 ...


2

I don't see any darkening on the braces, rafters, or underside of the roof deck, as I would expect if you had that much mold. It looks like plain dust to me.


2

This is a subjective question which depends on your prerogative for several things. How long will you stay in the home (or what's your predilection for saving the planet)? Better venting may keep the attic cooler, which may in turn reduce air conditioning costs (financial and ecological). The payoff (in time and pollution savings) isn't clear without a ...


2

If you have wires/cables that run across the top of the attic floor joists, you could build up the joist with ripped 2x4's that would provide another 1-1/2 inch clearance above the joists for the wires. You would have to provide a gap between the added sections of wood to provide a channel for the wires to lay in. Or lay 2x4's flat perpendicular to the ...


2

Yes it is mold , don’t panic all wood has mold spores. Most of the spores are not hazardous the only way to know is by testing. If you want to kill the mold bleach water OR hydrogen peroxide and water 3% both will kill surface mold. I prefer hydrogen peroxide as it doesn’t stink. Keeping the attic well vented really helps to stop mold growth but a few spots ...


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