6

That could have been a great second floor if it was framed that way. With the high pitch roof you have, it HAD high potential. In my opinion, you will be better off removing the whole roof system and reframing it from scratch. The way the trusses are configured with a 2X4 bottom cord, the restructuring needs to start from the ceiling of the original floor, ...


3

You don’t give us all the info we need, but I’ll make some assumptions and you let me know if I’m wrong. The roof and ceiling structure is what we call “stick framing” it is not framed with trusses. The roof joists appear to be 2x8’s at 24” on center. Therefore, I’m assuming the ceiling joists are the same. 2x8’s cannot span 30’ without additional supports. ...


3

TL;DR Correct, there is almost no chance of this space being permitted. If it does get permitted then you need to seek the details as to how. Check the inspector's certification, check with the town, find out if they qualified for variances, etc... Occupiable spaces, habitable spaces and corridors shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet 6 inches ...


3

Usually you'd add new joists of the correct size, in between (but not fastened too) the old joists. Pack them up slightly off the wallplate (10mm or so) so any flex in the new joists won't touch the existing ceiling. This method separates the old existing ceiling from the new floor and ensures that the new loads from above are transferred to the wallplate (...


2

I doubt 2x4 joists on 16" centers are going to support a floor, you may have to run 2x6's over the span all the way to the top plates of the walls. This is probably something that a structural engineer should look at.


1

I did that, added plywood over blown insulation . It may cause some compression depending on joist size. I have some 2 X 12 joists - no problem . Also some 2 X 6 area , I added 2 X 4 on top to give 9" depth. Also the plywood itself adds some insulation and restricts any convective air flow . So, even with a little compression I think there is a net ...


1

I have done what you asked when I was an insulator for a few years. Unfaced batts were added horizontally. After each run was set and bedded well over the lower insulation, wires were placed at the top of the horizontal run, using screw eyes, there is a tool that zips these right in that you use on your drill, or staples. Then the next horizontal run was ...


1

Two separate issues here: Attics Get Hot! This is a fact of life. Attics heat up from the sun all day long. Color and type of roof can make some difference (reflection vs. absorption), but it is quite normal for an attic to get really hot. The usual solution is an attic fan. This can be thermostatically controlled so it only runs when hot. For an attic fan ...


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