6

That could have been a great second floor if it was framed that way. With the high pitch roof you have, it HAD high potential. In my opinion, you will be better off removing the whole roof system and reframing it from scratch. The way the trusses are configured with a 2X4 bottom cord, the restructuring needs to start from the ceiling of the original floor, ...


4

2x6 joists at the span that you are talking about (16' and 18') are not strong enough to support a floor as a living space. With a span like that the timber size that you sister in would have to be at least 2x10's. Look this up in a joist span table (available in numerous places on the web) if you do not believe me. Trying to install cross bracing on the ...


3

You don’t give us all the info we need, but I’ll make some assumptions and you let me know if I’m wrong. The roof and ceiling structure is what we call “stick framing” it is not framed with trusses. The roof joists appear to be 2x8’s at 24” on center. Therefore, I’m assuming the ceiling joists are the same. 2x8’s cannot span 30’ without additional supports. ...


3

TL;DR Correct, there is almost no chance of this space being permitted. If it does get permitted then you need to seek the details as to how. Check the inspector's certification, check with the town, find out if they qualified for variances, etc... Occupiable spaces, habitable spaces and corridors shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet 6 inches ...


3

There are many kinds of engineers and most are specialists like: civil (water, sewer, drainage, etc.); structural; mechanical (plumbing? HVAC, etc.); electrical; acoustical; etc. Architects know building components like: windows, stairs, doors, roofing, etc. plus they know code issues like required setbacks, energy use (insulation, vapor barriers, etc.). ...


3

This is "Ridge board and rafters": These are roof Trusses: From your pictures, you clearly have ridge boards with rafters coming off of them. The reason trusses shouldn't hold the weight of flooring or heavy boxes is because they are typically made from relatively small boards (2x4's in some cases) and the bottom board is already carrying a significant ...


3

Yes. Very possible. It has to be engineered though. We have plans to do just this. The drawings and engineering cost around $1000. I wouldn't try it unless an engineer has looked at it, drawn a plan and signed off on it. For us we are going over a 3 car garage and the roof pitch is 12-12. So a lot of space there. The plan is to remove the drywall ceiling ...


3

Usually you'd add new joists of the correct size, in between (but not fastened too) the old joists. Pack them up slightly off the wallplate (10mm or so) so any flex in the new joists won't touch the existing ceiling. This method separates the old existing ceiling from the new floor and ensures that the new loads from above are transferred to the wallplate (...


2

It’s difficult to see, but I suspect your gable end wall is not ballooned framed, but rather has a double top plate. This creates a “hinge” in the wall. The diagonal braces keep the end wall from bending like a hinge during a wind storm or seismic activity. (I know, you’re going to tell me the ceiling will keep everything square and plumb. However, ceilings ...


2

I doubt 2x4 joists on 16" centers are going to support a floor, you may have to run 2x6's over the span all the way to the top plates of the walls. This is probably something that a structural engineer should look at.


2

One old technique that might work here is the “let in ribbon” or “cut in ribband”. This traditional method was used in “balloon framing”. Before the wide adaptation of “platform framing” with the advent of air conditioning - there was no top plate to rest your joist on. This still meets code if done properly: R502.6 Bearing. The ends of each joist beam or ...


2

There are many steel building hardware options. Simple joist hangers would do if you don't mind adding studs on the other side of each joist. I'd probably sister 2x10 or other suitable joists and use double hangers. One other option might be to bolt a ledger to the wall under the joists, giving them bearing. You'd have to box it out or fur out the entire ...


2

I also would discourage this idea. The railing is there for reason; to keep people from falling through the hole. No mater how you build your trap door you are always going to have a hole in the floor that someone could fall through.


2

From this picture it hardly looks like the stairs "cuts the room in half". In fact it looks like the stairs hug all the way to one side of the room. I would strongly discourage you from proceeding with the idea that you propose. If the horizontal trap door were closed in the event of a fire it may very well be just that...a trap the prevents you from ...


2

If you have wires/cables that run across the top of the attic floor joists, you could build up the joist with ripped 2x4's that would provide another 1-1/2 inch clearance above the joists for the wires. You would have to provide a gap between the added sections of wood to provide a channel for the wires to lay in. Or lay 2x4's flat perpendicular to the ...


1

I did that, added plywood over blown insulation . It may cause some compression depending on joist size. I have some 2 X 12 joists - no problem . Also some 2 X 6 area , I added 2 X 4 on top to give 9" depth. Also the plywood itself adds some insulation and restricts any convective air flow . So, even with a little compression I think there is a net ...


1

Two separate issues here: Attics Get Hot! This is a fact of life. Attics heat up from the sun all day long. Color and type of roof can make some difference (reflection vs. absorption), but it is quite normal for an attic to get really hot. The usual solution is an attic fan. This can be thermostatically controlled so it only runs when hot. For an attic fan ...


1

You say you don’t like answers that start with, “...the Code says...”, but I say, the Code says, “Habitable rooms, hallways and basements containing habitable spaces shall have a ceiling height of 7’ min. (ICC R305) Also, it says, “ For rooms with sloped ceilings, the required floor area of the room shall have a ceiling height of not less than 5’ and not ...


1

The Code (ICC Table R301.5) an attic floor or a sleeping room floor shall support a minimum of 30 lbs. per square foot plus all dead loads (carpet, floor sheathing, joists, ceiling finish below, etc. ) I’d estimate your total load at about 12 lbs. per square foot dead load plus 30 lbs. per square foot live load for a total load of 42 lbs. per square foot. ...


1

I suspect where they are screwed together, they overlap and there's a load bearing wall beneath. Is that correct? You say the span of the joists is "probably 6 feet" but that the critical measurement. If they're really only 6' long, 2x6's at 16" on center are fine, in fact they'll go a bit further under normal conditions. If they are older ...


1

Code requires a Live Load of 40 lbs. per square foot plus a Dead Load (flooring, joists, insulation, etc.) of 15 psf (probably) for a total load of 55 psf. #3 spruce/ fir (fb = 1200 psi & fv = 95 psi) spanning 14’ will support about 40 psf at 16” oc. #2 (fb = 1750 psi & fv = 120 psi) will support about 60 psf. The main difference between #2 ...


1

You'd need to double-check, but does the 270mm regulation apply to existing houses as well? Otherwise, I've seen plenty of lofts cross battened with 150mm or 175mm deep timbers and boarded on top. Not sure where you want the air gap, condensation shouldn't be a problem here unless you plan on not heating the office... An alternative is to go for a warm roof ...


1

Sistering a 2x8 joist to your existing 2x6 joists at 16" oc will work. However, I'd use a No. 1 grade rather than No. 2 & better. The Code requires a minimum of 40 lbs. per square foot live load and I'd assume about 15lbs. Per square foot dead load for a total design load of 55 lbs. per square foot. The 2x8 plus the 2x6 with No. 1 grade joists will ...


1

Yes, if you don't have a way for the heat to escape rapidly. Radiant Barriers aren't insulation. So, if the reflected heat can't get away quickly, like in a wall, the Radiant Barrier won't do anything of benefit in your location since you would want it facing the exterior to repel heat. It really would only be useful if it were installed as your exterior ...


1

The roof itself doesn't matter. It is the boards on the bottom (truss chords) or ceiling joists that will carry the weight of whatever you are storing. If it is a few boxes of christmas ornaments that is one thing, but if you try to store your bowling ball collection up there and build a weight room then you will be in trouble. Any normal floor is built on ...


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