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12

Asphalt is only as good as the base it's laid on. The fact that you appear to have vegetation growing out of the cracks implies that the base may be a bit iffy right there. There's no particular benefit to ripping up 6 feet of driveway and changing to cobblestone if you have a few inches deteriorating - since your picture only shows a small area, and the ...


7

Option A: keep doing what you did, and expect it to fail every winter; be pleasantly surprised if it does not some years. Option B: tear up the driveway and put a proper base under it. The lack of a proper base is almost certainly why it self-destructs in winter. If you can stand the annual work, Option A can be done for MANY years before you begin to touch ...


6

That is terrible and totally unacceptable. There are several issues: 1) insufficient asphalt to bind the aggregates, 2) no compaction, 3) improper aggregate mix, 1) Asphalt (liquid) should be a thick soupy consistency that completely coats the aggregates throughout the top 2” minimum layer. 2) With loose rocks laying on the top, this is an indication ...


5

3/4 minus (21AA in US Midwest) is perfect for this application. Hope you have some college kids around, that's nearly 2 cubic yards! I would overdig another 6" to be able to place an edging to retain the gravel and make a clean edge. Place the gravel in 2" "lifts" (lay down 2") and then compact with a plate vibrator. Repeat twice. Enjoy! 6" compacted ...


5

All pavement has edges, and you can't really protect them other than preventing standing water and significant ice buildup in the gaps. In your case I'd do one of two things... Make parallel cuts across the driveway and remove a strip of asphalt around the damage. Fill it with cold-pack or hot mix if you can source it cheaply. Seal the entire driveway ...


4

A number of guilty teenagers, a broom or two, a shovel, a wheelbarrow. Your job is to point out when the job has not been completed to your satisfaction, until it has been. Your job is definitely NOT cleaning up the sand.


4

Ground settles over time, and asphalt isn't as rigid as it looks. During the summer, asphalt softens a bit. It will somewhat conform to the ground under it. Vehicles will create depressions in the surface. It will develop cracks. Water gets into the cracks and softens the ground under it, making it more susceptible to deforming under the weight of ...


4

Microwaves work by exciting the molecules in liquids that then trasfer their heat into surrounding materials. To be safe, "microwavable" products have water in them so that the water molecules are what heats up. If you use a product not designed for this, you could end up volatizing (vaporizing) VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) that are not only harmful, ...


3

If your driveway is anything like mine, you can't. The cracking is caused by expansion/contraction, which is especially bad in winters where we get a ton of snow. Water can get into the existing cracks, find it's way down below the surface, and then it freezes, which causes more cracks. It can also depend on the grading around your driveway. I live up in ...


3

Cold patch asphalt repair can be packed into holes and stands up well for standard car/truck use. If the hole is really deep you can pack crushed rock to fill the hole and save some $. I would not use pea gravel to fill the deeper holes as it never locks together like crushed rock. After filling and adding the patch material I like to run over it with my ...


3

You have divots in a concrete driveway. I'd saw around the divot area, break it all out, and pour concrete, rather than anything to do with asphalt. Drill some holes in the edges and insert steel to tie the patch to the slab. If following the "quick fix" fill-on-top approach, possibly thinset (tile cement) but trying to do anything with concrete in the ...


3

BMitch is right on his comment. This probably wasn't "dirt" but was some oil, rust, other chemicals... When you paint over them you dry them out and the result is a chemical reaction with the paint/stain because you are drying the material out - it cannot access air - and it will try to escape through the stains you see. I know this because I paint my ...


3

FWIW: I like to use the liquid crack filler for that purpose. Pour/smear it around on the joining surfaces. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Latex-ite-1-Gal-2X-Premium-Blacktop-Crack-Filler-2XCFC/100080909


3

I recommend getting a few quotes from some paving companies. They will know how to best make the repair. However, keep reading. I live in Upstate NY. It sounds like you've never done asphalt but if you're interested then you'll need the following supplies: 7" Circular saw with at least 10 amps of power (make sure it's corded, batteries will die too ...


3

Everyone will probably look at the curb itself, and come up with useful suggestions, so I'll let other answers deal with that. I shall address the less obvious but nevertheless likely source of the problem: the damping elements in the car's suspension. If your car has less than 75k miles on it and is not considered a budget car, then probably dampers aren't ...


3

A fix sometimes seen in my region is steel plates: something on the order of 1/2" thick and long enough to bridge roughly from the edge of the asphalt to halfway up the approach. Sometimes I see it as a single piece of plate the full width of the approach; other times multiple narrower plates are placed side by side to cover the full width. I suppose ...


3

Yes, you could try the asphalt patch but after a few winter freezes, it would crack and crumble. A better, more permanent solution would be to dig out about 12 square feet in front of your stairs, about a 3.5' x 3.5' area. Regrade it to eliminate the pooling and install patio stones/pavers. You'd loose some asphalt but it's not that great to look at and you'...


3

Possible causes: (not all of them equally likely) Burrowing. Poor compacting prior to paving. Wood e.g roots, logs, garbage left under the gravel now decomposing. Could be water erosion, perhaps a burst pipe. That would probably be obvious though. I'd make a small effort to determine what's causing it, but at this stage I wouldn't make too much effort at ...


2

If you try to do this with a circular saw, your "straight line" will look straight only to Salvatore Dali. A heavy duty street cutter is required. Of course, what objective there could be in cutting a driveway we can only guess at.


2

If, when pouring the concrete right up against the asphalt, you end up with parts of the concrete that taper or feather out to less than say about 1.5 -> 2.0 inches thick you will have trouble keeping the concrete in one piece. The thin parts are likely to fracture and break off. I suspect that if you rented a concrete type saw and cut off the asphalt in a ...


2

How can I fill in the cracks and keep it together? I wouldn't do that. I would search for a local supplier of asphalt patch Random example:


2

Concrete isn't for resurfacing. It's a structure unto itself. So you need to likely pour at least a 4-5" slab for it to work as new garage flooring. So that means your current flooring would have had to sink 4-5" already. The catch with that is that for it to sink (at all, really) it means it had a poor base to begin with (or no base). As such, I'd say ...


2

My boyfriend has a driveway with a crushed run base, #57 stone topped on that, recycled pavement dust over that, with bagged asphalt for the top layer. He got it to fuse using 1 part gasoline* to 2 parts diesel fuel. It was sprinkled with a watering can, then packed with a tamper. After a week of 90 degrees, it finally cured. He then thinned down driveway ...


2

No. Sealer isn't nearly strong enough to support the tremendous tearing forces at play. Instead, watch your local community sale websites for used or leftover concrete pavers. You want the heavy duty ones, which are about 2-1/2" thick. With a little patience and luck you should find a relatively inexpensive lot that will give you proper pavement for life. ...


2

You can certainly fill with cold patch, though for good adhesion you would need to start with getting the area really dry, which will be considerable work as it's a low spot that holds a puddle. What may happen, and is more likely if you don't get it well-dried out before applying the cold patch, would be water getting or staying between the patch and the ...


2

I talked to one of the petro-mat sellers and found out that the standard petro-mat needs a liquid "tack coat" poured down before the geotextile is put down. Typically the fabric is put down with a special machine. To put it down manually would ideally involve four people, one standing at each corner, because if folds or wrinkles form, the piece ...


2

I would use a sealer and sand, first I would pour the sealer on just enough to almost fill the area, then with clean dry sand sprinkle it on top and work it in so it looks black, when it drys it will be much smother and will not hold water like the porous surface will and the sand provides a binder and helps to reduce the “slick” or slippery texture. I have ...


2

When I built my 1st home 40+ years ago I noticed that my neighbor had a beautiful, smooth, and very black asphalt driveway. I remarked to him that it looked great. He said it looks great but has the same problem that you are describing, being very soft on a hot day. I inquired about this problem with the asphalt driveway guy and he said that an asphalt ...


2

I would believe your gutter downspout pipes are in that location(s) if not well sealed or if perf pipe was used without being packed in gravel the dirt gets washed away and creates a hole. I would look for this being the cause as I have seen this when solid pipe was used and cracked later washing the dirt away. Look in the hole if you see a drain you ...


2

Normal expansion and contraction. That's what asphalt does. In Minnesota those cracks show up within two years of road resurfacing due to our weather extremes. It is exacerbated by age, where the asphalt has dried and doesn't stretch as well.


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