18

As I've posted before, the risks of asbestos exposure on a very infrequent basis in a residential setting are highly over-blown. The real risks were for construction workers (pipe insulators, HVAC insulators, etc. ), back 50-60 years ago who where exposed to asbestos dust on a daily basis. I know the lawyers will hate me for saying this, but frankly ...


7

if it was an interior wall, there would likely be no insulation. Even if it was insulated for some odd reason, most wool-type insulation (the kind you'd expect to find in walls) does not contain asbestos. The main form of asbestos tainted insulation in most single family homes is probably vermiculite, and you would generally not find any large amounts of ...


6

TL;DR Don't worry, be happy. In my non-professional, non-government opinion, you are overreacting. The risk with asbestos (as with smoking, radon and many similar things) is repeated exposure. That doesn't mean a single exposure has no effect, but the big problem is with repeated exposure. Something like, tearing up a floor each day, 200 x a year for 20 ...


6

If you were not making dust to breathe from the space behind the wall, approximately zero asbestos exposure, if there's even any there to begin with. 1980 is a bit late for most new installations. Mold from having wet walls festering might be more of an actual concern, but if it's asbestos you're fixated on, little cause for concern.


6

I wouldn't worry so much about it. Wipe it down as best you can and then run a few empty cycles to flush the machine. The wastewater goes... well assuming you are in a relatively modern area with relatively modern infrastructure... to a treatment plant along with myriad other nasty stuff. While it is true that any exposure to friable asbestos should be ...


6

Where have you seen asbestos ? When I dug it out of a 50 lb bag in the back of a store room that everybody forgot; 100 % Asbestos was a fluffy grey powder . I mixed it with sodium silicate to make my own muffler cement before auto exhaust were stainless ( which are great). The material in the photo looks exactly as @ trond said ,fiberglass /mineral wool as ...


6

IMHO Asbestos dangers have been dramatically over-stated for the general public. The people who were in real danger are people who worked with asbestos in an industrial setting, like ship workers insulating pipes, heating techs insulating pipes and ducts with asbestos etc. , day in and day out, cutting it, being exposed to it's dust. Extremely limited ...


4

Asbestos exposure is not like cynanide where it can cause immediate death. Most asbestos-related illness is with people who worked with the material over a long period of time. Is there danger from such an exposure? Yes, but it's remote. Once inhaled there is nothing you can do about it. The best approach is to get your home tested and if it's found to ...


4

Vermiculite itself has not been shown to be a health problem or contain asbestos. However, some vermiculite insulation contained asbestos fibers due to it being extracted from a mine in Montana that had a natural deposit of asbestos which contaminated the Vermiculite. If used for popcorn ceiling, the asbestos wasn't purposely added but could have been left ...


4

When asbestos was used in everything from cooking pan trays to attic insulation on ducts I don't remember hearing of it being mixed into concrete walls or floors. Even if it was used with the concrete the only way to release it and have it become air borne (where it is a hazard through inhalation) would be if the floor was chiseled or ground on. Mopping or ...


3

Is it possible that we are releasing fibers? Anything is possible, but it is highly unlikely that incidental contact would release fibers. It is also highly unlikely that there is any appreciable amount of asbestos there (if any at all). There is a ZERO percent chance, assuming there is asbestos there, that the scenario you are describing would in any way ...


3

There are many non-asbestos high-temperature fiber insulations (Kaowool, Superwool, rockwool, etc.) - but as with all asbestos questions, you can't tell by looking, so send a sample to a lab if it's of an age where asbestos is possible. Fiberglass won't take the heat, so it's not that.


3

What manassehkatz says. Because of the tragedy of lifelong workers getting mesothelioma, and the government's ability to catch these companies with some assets, a number of mesothelioma trust funds were set up. Unfortunately cashing in requires a bit of legal legwork, so that gives a role for lawyers. But the success rate is much higher than a lawsuit, so ...


3

It does not look like typical fiberglass. The era is right. Testing and reasonable care is certainly advisable, as is a reminder that most "effects of asbestos exposure" are from chronic exposure (folks that worked with the stuff) not whatever tiny bit you may have been exposed to in ripping one or two pipes open before going: Hmm, this doesn't ...


3

What is the real threat? Asbestos comes in several forms. The one we're concerned with is a puffy/wooly fine-fiber version similar to today's fiberglass matt or rockwool; it's job is to prevent air circulation so the air can be used as an insulator. The air insulates, not the puffy mat material. Asbestos is also made in "hard" form as a pressed/...


2

It tested negative for asbestos, though the surveyor (in to check out the house) did recommend testing as it was reinforced with some kind of fibre so potentially asbestos. I've dug up several large sections so I think Ecnerwal was right - old shed roofing.


2

I would not be too concerned about a HEPA - or any new filter - containing asbestos. Asbestos has been so clearly outlawed for a long time in pretty much any consumer facing usage, especially anything that could result in airborne asbestos (which is the concern - solid/encapsulated is just not a problem) that I find it hard to believe even the Chinese would ...


2

sent them some pictures over text... they said this is 99% asbestos... Immediately throw away the phone number and email address of this company because what they told you is poppycock. Without a lab analysis nobody can say whether or not that plaster contains asbestos, and certainly not what percent/volume or weight. I have met insulation specialists, who ...


2

The yellow dust is not asbestos, but the pulverized remains of the padding placed there many years ago. Over time and from many, many foot steps the resilient cushioning became dried and brittle. The continued trampling from thousands of shoes stomped it into dust. It is easily cleaned-up. Although there is sometimes remnants stuck to the floor which can be ...


2

This is the remnants of a cheap "rug gripper" type of underpad. They tend to slowly disintegrate just like this. It's almost certainly rubber. You should worry not about asbestos but more about the fact that your seller's approach to cleanliness involved lifting and cleaning under rugs at most once per decade but probably never. Sweep gently ...


2

Looks like degraded carpet glue. Asbestos seems highly unlikely, but you can have it lab tested if you have asbestos-paranoia. If the house is less than 35-40 years old, it's exceedingly unlikely to have any asbestos anywhere. If it's older, it becomes more likely. The "classic" asbestos-containing floor adhesive is "black mastic"


2

You cannot identify asbestos-containing material by looking at it. If in doubt have it tested!


1

JWH is correct: simple visual inspection will be inconclusive. But to point up that you are right to be concerned, here's Wikipedia: The use of asbestos became increasingly widespread toward the end of the 19th century, when its diverse applications included fire-retardant coatings, concrete, bricks, pipes and fireplace cement, heat-, fire-, and acid-...


1

I would fill any voids where there are missing tiles. If you want to paint the tiles that encapsulates it but the underlayment foam for the floating floor will be enough to do the same. If you do not use a underlayment foam the flooring will wear through paint and even some less expensive epoxy paints so a quality underlayment helps in the long run to ...


1

A: Lab test is the only way. B: In most parts of the civilized world, 1987 is VERY late for still having asbestos in any building product. C: You already removed it, which means you already handled it and made whatever dust there was to be made. Can't put that genie back in the bottle. However, See item B, as well as know that chronic exposure is much more ...


1

That just looks like standard “mud”. The common ceiling texture that is known to contain asbestos is “popcorn texture” not what you have. I doubt it contains asbestos but the date the work was done and the location would also help. if the home was built after 1984 in the US I would not worry about it but testing is the only way to know for sure.


1

That looks like regular dried-up old glazing putty. If it was me I would soften it using a heat gun while scraping it with a putty knife or similar tool. Then I would rig a guide on my router and remove all remaining putty (and maybe a thin bit of the wood) with the router. I might use a paintbrush to soak it with mineral spirits prior to routing, to reduce ...


1

In the U.S., regulations allow a residential home owner to remove a certain amount of asbestos without training or license, (i.e.: 9 square feet of asbestos floor tile per day, etc.) However, disposal is highly regulated, both in proper container and location. You’ll need to check with your local governing agency for specifics. If you hire the abatement to ...


1

As a general rule, it's virtually impossible to tell from photographs if something does or does not contain asbestos, the only way to tell for sure is to take small samples of it and sent it to a lab to be tested. Anything else is not worth the paper is is (not) written on...


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