108

Stop, turn off the gas, ventilate the house, and hire a pro. If you applied teflon tape to a flare fitting, you are NOT the person to be installing your gas range. You fundamentally don't understand what you are doing, and doing this wrong can blow up your house. That tends to impair the "learn from your mistakes" method of learning. This is not the place ...


30

That cable, as is, will tend to "bite people". It also has damage that could increase resistance there causing that spot in the cable to get hot. Continued flexing will worsen the wire damage and the heating. An electrical-tape repair will work temporarily, but I would not resell it like that. The right way is take your time and find a gray power cord ...


25

Repeating the comments : Do NOT use any pipe dope or tape on flare connections . They are metal to metal seals and anything on the metal sealing surface can cause a leak. Pipe threads (tapered) require dope/tape to get a good seal. I analysed a house fire once and the primary cause was a leak caused by dope on a flare fitting.


25

Kris' comment is likely a good reference. Consider to perform a test by operating only one device. If the duration of normal operation increases, or normal operation continues throughout the test, it's an indication of too-low temperatures preventing the tank from allowing evaporation. The backfire of the generator is another indication of insufficient ...


21

Let's learn about energy: BTUs. Put 1 pound of water (just shy of a pint) on the stove and stick a thermometer in it. Turn the stove on, and watch the water warm up on the thermometer. You're watching energy in action. Every 1 degree of temperature rise means you added 1 "BTU" (British Thermal Unit) of energy into the water. So if it's 62F and you're ...


20

Having had to manhandle quite a few appliances on my own I would do this. Put the truck tray down. Tip the appliance over until the top just rests on the edge of the tray. Lift the back of the appliance and push forward. Use cardboard under it if you don't want to damage the side. Once it is all in, stand the appliance up. This way you are never deadlifting ...


19

It won't work. Your 220V (really probably 240) outlets will actually have 0V, not 110V. The reason for this is that normally the 220V outlets make their 220 by taking both 110 lines that are out of phase with each other, such that while 1 is at +110, the other is at -110 for a difference of 220. Since the power company bridged one of the 110 lines to ...


16

Yes, the most common solution is to sell your US appliances and buy new in India. The difficulties and expense of getting transformers etc and making it impossible for others to connect the wrong things is not worth the time or expense. But your money your choice, I’m basing this on the decisions others have made... And I do have a 230v to 110v transformer ...


15

I have a local delivery service and use a hand truck and the sides of my tray as ramps to load and unload large furniture on my own. It only takes a second or two to wheel modern fridges and most other items up this way. For anything requiring a dolly I keep a light, cheapo steel block and tackle in my kit, which were left over from a kid's flying fox, but ...


13

It depends. The proper procedure would of course be to replace the cord, but from a safety perspective, insulating tape will work. It may be against regulation, and if you have kids or pets around it may be unadvisable. The main problem is that tape tends to sag and move over time. A better solution than electrical tape would be either zipper tube, which is ...


12

That broken pipe has let all the refrigerant escape, so it will no longer work. Compared to the cost of a new one, the repair will likely be more expensive given the time, tools and materials involved.


11

Ask your propane company to check the gas pressure anywhere in the system and then fire all appliances in the system, the low pressure side (after the second stage regulator) should stay above 11 inches of water column on a water gauge. If it goes below 11 inches look for an obstruction in the gas piping. I am a service technician at a propane company and ...


9

Motorcycle-style ratchets don't do well for this. Their levers are short, meaning you don't have much pull, and when the spool gets full of strap you're done until you reset, which means you need to temporarily support the load. I suggest looking for a ditch and some 2x10 lumber, then just wheel it up.


8

Those straps aren't rated for straight lifting, and I wouldn't recommend that anyway. Ramps are the way to go, and I would combine ramps with those straps, along with some sort of friction modifier such as the appliance's wheels or bars of Ivory soap. Just expect it to fail worst case at any time, watch what you are doing to assure it doesn't, and move an ...


8

A "decent surface area" would lead me to drill and pin it using some metal dowels as well as using glue. That should help spread the stress caused by using it and make the repair last longer.


7

I think you have a couple of factors to consider in using a condensate pump. One is the volume of water per unit time relative to what the pump can handle. A condensate pump is going to expect a trickle flow from the air conditioning system. When used as a washing machine pump, the float will rise as the reservoir fills and activate the pump. Will the ...


7

Most North American style dryers will work on 120V power one of two ways: Make both hots (the same pole of) 120V, neutral is neutral In this case, the 120V equipment on the dryer will work. It is not guaranteed to be this way, but likely it will be the timer, controls, blower, and tumble motor. So it can "air fluff". However, the heat will not work ...


6

Insulating tape will make it safe in the short term. In the long term (or if accessible to pets or children) it can come off or be pulled off. It is often hard to replace the power cord. Sometimes the case of the appliance is impossible to open. Other times the cable restraint/grommet is moulded onto the appliance end, and no other piece of cable could be ...


6

Everyone else is right. It’s supposed to be a metal-metal seal, so tape won’t do anything. Glue or caulking would not fix it, and trying to welding it or solder it won’t end nicely. Basically, Either the seal or a thread is damaged and you should get a professional to fix it. If not, your leak could not only destroy your home and possibly your neighbor’s ...


5

As others have indicated, there is a very real danger that you have damaged the fitting in an attempt to fix it. Further attempts to fix it can cause things to get worse. And you can solve the immediate problem, but have it corrode or fail over time. Even if you live in an area where you don't have to have a license to work on the gas connection, there ...


5

It seems like the "trail and error" approach is not smart. I like the suggestion to request prop 65 MSDS for the part, if there is one available. Best practical suggestion came from elsewhere: apply a tiny test patch where it won't show and won't affect the joint, just to see if the selected glue/solvent/expoxy will bond. If the test patch works, then ...


5

The wire nuts will be fine. I do not like push in wago connectors but love lever locks. In high vibration equipment sometimes I will lock the wire nuts with some electrical tape but if properly installed with 2 twists of the wire I have not had them come loose , I just like the idea that the tape water proofs the connection.


4

Your description of red, black and conduit indicates that you do not have neutral but just ground via conduit. That is NOT a good thing. A little background: Ovens, cooktops, etc. typically need 240V for heating elements but 120V for lights and controls. In order to get 120V, you need a neutral wire (normally white). In the old days, there was a neutral ...


4

You bought it new a year ago, and the manufacturer appears to have a decent warranty. Contact them. Any "taking it apart to fix it" is likely to interfere with the proper warranty process. For reference, it's probably something wrong with the motor; you can confirm by using a cardboard tube or the like to focus on specific areas of the treadmill.


4

If you connected the right wires together and followed the directions on the wire nut package then you're good to go. They are as good as the spade connectors as far as connecting wires. If a wire nuts did come off, which would be no different than a wire coming off the capacitor, and come in contact with the frame, it would trip the breaker because the ...


4

The answer, as mentioned by +MonkeyZeus, is here: https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/29857 It can be summarized as: This is a myth left over from the days of iceboxes. Go to any official food safety resource online (including USDA, FDA, etc.), and you will find they are all in agreement: it's perfectly safe to put hot food in your refrigerator. In ...


4

From the look of the burn on the stove it is not to do with pressure. The flame would be short or lazy this is not the case. With this going on all at one time it is something in the gas. Propane CO use alcohol in the gas in the winter to keep things from freezing up. This will cause some deep red in the flame but this would not make them to soot up that I ...


3

Take a look at the lid switch. On some machines, the lid switch only interrupts the spin cycle. But it may be required to be closed for everything on this machine. The lid switch can fail with little or no warning and should, ideally, fail open rather than closed.


3

Because continuity, alone, is an indicator of nothing. Actually, you've got way too much continuity! But you are not testing for that. You should test the resistance of the coil, better, measure its inductance. Not happy stuff. This is the crux of your problem. You have a shorted coil. It's very obvious, from the big arc flash coming from the ...


3

I'm not aware of any condensate pumps capable of handling that much water but you could use a small sump pump in a suitably sized basin. There is a condensate pump on Amazon that claims 4 gpm but I'm sure just about any washer drains more than that. The condensate that comes out of a furnace or boiler will be more corrosive and harsh than the water coming ...


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