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54

What we have here is a Hirth Joint. A Hirth joint or Hirth coupling is a type of mechanical connection named after its developer Albert Hirth. It is used to connect two pieces of a shaft together and is characterized by tapered teeth that mesh together on the end faces of each half shaft.


28

Cut it perpendicularly. 70 degrees from 90 degrees (ie: a right angle) is 20 degrees. Square the end of your taper and put a mark in the middle. Set your saw on 20 degrees and place the mark so that the taper makes a T with the cutting rail, cut one side, flip the taper over, cut the other. If you're concerned about stability - make an L shaped jig which ...


11

Expanding from my comment on isherwood's answer. From the Hirth Joint article: Hirth-like joints are often found on camera support equipment, where they are called rosette [joint]s.


10

At the risk of sounding like a complete idiot why don't you clamp a block to the saw fence so that the stake is skewed 10 degrees when flat against the block and fence? Then you can just set the saw at 60 and chop. For cutting hundreds of them a circular saw may be quicker and easier though. Once you know the length of the taper you can place a bunch of ...


8

This doesn't have anything to do with saws, but it's too long for a comment. Instead of trying to come up with a better stake, maybe come up with a completely different solution. My first thought at seeing the "penetrating hard clay soil" was to use a wood/spade drill bit to drill a pilot hole in the ground before trying to tamp in the stake. There are ...


6

So given you exclude the most obvious tools I would suggest cutting a card or cardboard template. Even a cereal box can be suitable for this.


4

You could make a jig out of scrap wood. If you make a 25 degree jig, you could set the saw to 45 degrees. 25 + 45 = 70. Once you cut one side, lining up the other side will be a little harder. You'd want to make a mark on the jig or maybe even make a second, more complex jig for the second cut.


3

Firstly, note that the cuts on two adjoining pieces should have the same angle, but in the opposite direction. Failure to do this will result in something like you've shown us here, with points sticking out and part of the cut end exposed. That's just not good at all. Secondly, each joint should pass exactly over the corner in the flooring. This doesn't ...


3

Well, If you were intending to weld them together you have a few choices. Cut them as close as you can with the chop saw and then grind each joint into the appropriate fit for the 90 degree corner. Mark with a angle square and cut with a hand hacksaw. Touch up if necessary with minor grinding. Use a power hack saw that has an angle clamp to hold the stock ...


3

No, 3-4-5 creates a right angle, not a 45 degree angle. In your example, “a” must equal “b” for “c” to have 45 degree angle cuts at the ends.


3

If it's a 45 degree angle, B=A. Or you can set any value you please for roof height. You don't need to know any trig, nobody cares what the angle is. People who do roofs work in rise/run ratio, not angles. The Pythagorean Theorem requires one corner be a regular square corner (90 degrees. Fit it to your roof one of two ways: if you are committed to 45 ...


3

All you have to do is measure from the top of your existing trim piece on the left straight across to the wall molding. Then measure from the bottom of the trim piece across to the same molding. Take the piece of trim you want to piece in and first cut it at 90 degrees to fit against the molding on the right. Then mark off the correct measurements you took ...


2

Cannot really answer your question because everything depends on you no matter what tool you use. Here are the four main factors: How crafty you with the tool when taking the measurement. Holding, sighting and marking are all part of this. What type of saw and saw fixturing you use to make the molding cuts. How you handle and use the saw tool. And to a ...


2

Use a chainsaw. It won't look pretty, but it doesn't have to: remember, you're trying to stick a piece of wood in the ground, not build a cabinet. This would by far be the fastest and simplest method. You could even stack a bunch of 2x4s on top of each other and make multiple cuts at once.


2

I did something similar to this in my younger years when I needed a board cut with a 45 degree angle. I marked the cut line on the edges and face of the board. Then positioned the saw to the cut line and clamped furring strips on the top and bottom of the board up against the positioned saw the length of the cut. the two furring strips acted as a double ...


2

Assuming that they are threaded in correctly, you just need to apply adequate force. Pipe threads are tapered to make a seal (which you don't care about in this application) but there is considerable latitude in how far they can be tightened, with proper pipe wrenches (always use two.) Otherwise, you can add unions to get exactly the angle you want, but the ...


2

These are 1/4 turn or ball valves, turn them fully on or off for best performance. Think of a bearing with a hole drilled through it. This is what a ball valve is there are 2 seals one on each side when the valve is turned fully off there is no way for the valve stem to leak when turned fully on again there is no pressure on the stem. At 50% open you do risk ...


2

Yes, you can assume that it will fit, but that won't get you a right angle in your table. Just cut a brace with 45 degree angles at each end and be sure that the ends are equidistant from the inside corner formed by the top and back panel. If you want to know the length of your brace, decide how far down/out you'd like it, then use the usual formula: ...


2

As pointed out in the comment, you can of course do it with a basic triangle calculator. Do yourself a huge favor and buy a speed square. They are $10 and are useful for so many things beyond just marking an angle on a board.


2

It is a slotted "L" bracket. It's available at most home stores.


2

I'm not aware of any reason for the corner of deck beams to be clipped like that other than for cosmetic purposes or clearance from something else. My rafter tails have a lovely curved end and a little decorative notch in them, however, my deck beams are not cut back at all. The rafter tails are exposed & nicely decorated (as are most of them in our ...


1

Typically it is done with a miter cut to get to level, or up easement, then a 45 degree level turn , then another miter cut to resume the angle or over easement, this will get the job done. You can do it with all on-site miters, or you can purchase "fixtures"... parts that are "pre-bent" to make smooth turns. Where I have "up ...


1

Do enough work with hand tools and you'll come to appreciate the main handtool - a bench with several clamping/vise options. Something modern like a workmate is a start, but a bit light for the job. The Trick (well, other than actually using a ripsaw [preferably a SHARP ripsaw] as Jack mentioned) you MAY not have thought of which makes this cut MUCH easier ...


1

For that shallow of a slope I'd be inclined to look at level railing kits and their associated hardware instead. That would be a much closer starting point. I'd then mill some 11° wedges from white vinyl to place behind the brackets, tilting them into position. If that's not a good solution, create some 20° wedges (31° - 11°). Pre-drill ...


1

Check your lower blade guide. Blade guides are either blocks or small roller bearings. To be out that much, I suspect that someone didn't reset the guide after the last blade change, or perhaps the block has fallen out.


1

It depends on the type of roofing you’re going to use. Its steep enough for single-ply membranes. We use single- ply membranes down to 1/4” per foot. Make sure you have adequate (large enough) gutters and downspouts. I live in a area that has a significant amount of rain (60” or more per year) and we have a few downpours too. I’d use a 4” gutter and 2 -...


1

A bit out-of-the-box but I was going to suggest a Tenon cutter (used to make log furniture). It would work best if (2) 2x4's were attached together to start with a square shape. Amazon Link However Tenon cutters tend to be (1) expensive, (2) they require a very heavy duty drill and (3) they can be dangerous if not used correctly. But along those lines ...


1

use a water level to find matching level spots inside and outside of the basement get a large jar of water get some tubing 1/8" to 1/4" long enough to reach from the carport, through a window or door onto the basement floor and up the wall of the basement fill the tubing with water, put one end in the jar of water (loop it through a large metal washer to ...


1

This is common, particularly with "new space saving" vanity cabinets from that great big scandinavian furniture retailer. You will either need to get very creative, potentially including cutting pieces out of the back of the vanity cabinet drawers, or you will need to open the wall and reconfigure your drain lines to accommodate. How hard do yall think ...


1

I'd have to guess that you may have installed it incorrectly, or failed to figure out what "correctly" is for your particular grinder/blade combination. I cut a lot of tile with a dry diamond blade on a grinder, and I do recall that the setup for the thin diamond blade was different than for a standard thick grinder blade, though I can't recall how it was ...


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