24

Bad idea...explained later. But yes, as long as you keep the blade guard on & of course it will "work". Though, it's quite wild compared to a Circular Saw or a smaller Trim Saw. However, "safely" is a bad gamble. You're talking about multiples of higher RPM's & both accuracy & control will then be largely out the window compared to proper ...


22

What you're describing is just inexperienced workmanship. You did a guillotine cut, like you would saw through a piece of wood. A better plan would be to use masking tape wrapped around it to designate the cut point, then cut through each face individually.


22

Using an angle grinder you're going to end up with melted PVC clogging the blade, and possible fire from hot metal/sparks that you are grinding igniting the plastic, etc. As such, the suggestion to use a reciprocating saw (effectively a form of power hacksaw) is valid - however, since you already own a hacksaw, and it does not seem like it should be such a ...


20

The Dewalt person is correct. Use the locking mechanism of the grinder to keep the shaft from turning while you tighten it down by hand. (Always unplug the grinder when replacing discs.) The rotation of the shaft is such that it will cause the wheel to tighten, not loosen. There are flat spots on back side of the wheel that you can get a wrench on, but ...


12

Warning image of injury Not safe not smart not at all a good idea. Even with a handle the weight to rpm ratio of an angle grinder make a bind or kick back a near death experience. I came within an inch of losing a thumb yesterday and will never be so careless and stupid again


12

I think you'd do better with a Sawzall. That's the trade name - like Kleenex, everyone uses the name no matter what the brand. Just looked up - it is generically a reciprocating saw. These things can be dangerous beasts, but I think they'd be a lot safer for this type of job than an angle grinder. Buy/beg/borrow/rent - for one small job, any of the options ...


10

If you'll indulge me a second, I do have a different take I am trying to build a simple bench using wood and steel for the frame. If you're working with wood, you can buy metal cutting discs for miter and circular saws (example). These might be tools you already own and they might get you the square cut you need without having to fiddle with the manual ...


9

If this is something you will do often, you can get an angle grinder holder that will allow it to function like a miniature chop saw. You can make your own, or you can buy a pre-made one, but they all have the basic idea of holding the grinder steady along the plane of the cut and allow it to pivot up and down to make the cut. This will limit you to ...


9

Yes, it'll be fine but heed the valid warnings given in the other answers about the minor risk of melting plastic and starting small fires. You won't instantly be sitting in the middle of a blazing inferno; it'd me more like having a few birthday candles in front of you, but the fumes are unpleasant.. The biggest risk from an angle grinder in this context is ...


8

Yeah, that's SOP for grinding wheels and wirebrush cups. The machine turns counterclockwise (from the business end), which will always tighten the screw thread. That's why the machine turns counterclockwise; if it turned the other way it would constantly be unscrewing the grinding wheels.


7

As the goal is just to make it smaller: I'd use a sledge hammer to fold it up until it fits in the car, or if there's room just store it (even outdoors) until the next council hard waste collection.


7

Hand grinders have a button to lock the spindle to remove or tighten a grinder wheel. It is usually on the housing above the wheel. Usually just a push button, that pushes a steel rod into a hole in the spindle, to lock it from turning. For safety should unplug grinder from power when changing grinder wheels. Original Poster here I am adding a picture of ...


6

Whether you use water or not is entirely dependent on the blade, not the material (unless you are cutting something soluble in water). Some binders used in diamond blades and bits take heat better than others, and the trade off is how the cut works (aggressive material removal, smooth finish, ability to cut heterogeneous materials, etc.) Do not use water ...


6

The hollow is meant to be mounted outward. This is so that the nut sits at or below flush, allowing the grinding face to be used without obstruction.


6

What I usually do when I'm cutting pipe depends on how square it actually needs to be. If it's going to be bearing against a surface, or if I'm threading the end of it, flatness is very important. If I can, I usually design things so that the ends of pipe don't need to be perfectly square, because that reduces work for everyone -- but sometimes it can't be ...


5

Different power gearing speeds collets tool diameters direction of forces means of use climb vs conventional accessories ability to sand or wirebrush I think even if you managed to fit a sawblade on a grinder, you would have a completely uncontrollable tool that would be impossible to successfully engage to any work except for cars full of lost college ...


5

Adding an answer because I happened to see a video on this which has a thoughtful and detailed analysis of why wood cutting / carving with an angle grinder can be so dangerous. The video also has a "caught on video" moment of such an accident (no real gory details). IMO visualizing such an accident is very healthy mental preparation for this tool (or ...


5

As you have implied, heating the metal is actually changing it near the cut and causing it to discolor. There's not soot or anything you can clean off - the metal is changed. You may be able to sand off the surface of the metal near the cuts to remove the discolored metal on the surface, but this will lead to a cut that doesn't look very clean and some ...


5

FWIW, I had a similar problem with some steel re-enforced concrete. I used a stone blade to cut away a load of the concrete, exposing a reasonably large amount of the steel, then switched to a metal blade to cut the steel. I did try a (new) hacksaw, but found it tedious, and seemed to dull the blade very quickly whilst doing relatively little to the steel. ...


5

A circular saw with a common carbide-tipped blade will make quick work of it. The steel in such frames is soft and will dull your blade only slightly, if at all. Otherwise, just knock it apart at the corners and slide it into the car. I carry 8' lumber in my little sedan all the time. Use eye and ear protection.


5

if you want to cut with an angle grinder use a cutting disc (also called a cut-off wheel) they are typically from 3 to 1mm thick. The thin ones are better because they cut faster. For longer blade life try using lighter pressure


4

Depending on the thickness of the blade, you flip the locking nut over. Also, it may or may not need the adapter for different disks.


4

I used a metal shear or rebar cutter. Quieter, quicker and no electricity required.


3

The trick with an angle grinder is not to try to cut the metal with one pass. That way, you are wasting the wheel and effectively heating up the metal, causing distortion and discoloration. The best way to cut with an angle grinder is to do so in multiple passes, and using the bottom part of the wheel to cut. For example, if you are cutting a straight cut ...


3

I would use a 4-1/2"- 5" angle grinder, I have dewalt, bosh, Makita and even a harbor freight. I use the very thin metal cutting disks fro cutting steel all the time, after cutting a pass done at a 90. a quick 45 will take the sharp edges off, if I want to polish or buff I use sanding disks, if I want to take rust off I will use a wire cup brush, in all ...


3

Generally speaking, they're both "circular". Pretty much anything that spins a blade is "circular" - miter saw, table saw, chop saw, trim saw. They're all spinning blades, but when you say "circular" most think of a "handheld" circular saw usually used for cutting wood. "Angle grinder" is referring to a specific tool. So, if this is for an answer on a ...


3

No it's not safe at all. I would usually be a safe operator of power tools and all that but recently had an accident using one for the first time which resulted in my getting a deep wound just above my right pelvis. My heavy jacket took most abuse for me (saved me really) but the blade still struck into the side of me and I spent the night in hospital. I was ...


3

I think I have enough research to make an answer to this. I believe it comes down to the guard available for this tool and it not meeting the requirements for a "Type 1" cut off disk. This Ridgid forum has what is supposed to be a quote from Ridgid: The RIDGID R1001 Angle Grinder has an included type 27 guard and is certified to Underwriters ...


3

No contest Sandblaster doesn't just beat, it positively trounces any other rust removal method. That's not me talking. It's NASA. Their location at Cape Canaveral ("Who picked this place? Nikita Khrushchev?") ... has a huge problem with rust due to being tidal and subject to sea spray. What a lovely place for millions of tons of steel latticework ...


2

You might be interested in a door jamb saw...


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