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Here is the professional method. Buy yourself a reverse drill bit, an easy out driver and start with a center punch to guide your drill bit. Remember to operate your drill in reverse as you drill a hole using a professional-grade metal cutting wax such as Relton Stick-Kut, then use an easy-out driver with plenty of straight, even down pressure to slowly ...


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You can find drop in anchors made for shallow materials such as this one at McMaster Carr. It accepts a 5/8" thread and requires 2" embedment. You'd just have to cut a short piece of 5/8" threaded rod, thread it into the anchor, then spin on the stop.


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This is kind of dodgy, but so is a 2" thick concrete floor. Take a 3 foot threaded rod. stick two nuts onto the top end (the top nut should not have any rod protruding). put the tip of the rod into the hole and drive it down into the sand using a heavy hammer, when the nuts reach the floor remove the nuts and squirt a a few cheap tubes of cyanoacrylate ...


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First - what kind of construction uses a 2" slab for a floor? Trying to get more concrete down there is unlikely without breaking out part of the floor because it needs something to displace in order to do what you want. Even if you got some down there it's very unlikely to hold. Why not go to a 3/8 x 2 1/4 expansion bolt. I know you're rightfully concerned ...


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Those are 2 different types of wall anchors. The blue ones are generally drywall anchors. You drill a hole just large enough for the blue plastic sleeve to press-fit in. Usually, you'll need a hammer to gently bang it in the final 1/4" (2-3 mm) - it should be that tight. You would then line up the mounting hole of the thing to be hung over the center of ...


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