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perhaps somebody sees this answer, as an alternative to Tapcon. I tried using Tapcons in my garage, and got into a whole lot of trouble. At first I thought I was hitting Rebarb, but it seems that concrete is non-uniform, and contains small hardened particles that are capable of getting tapcons stuck. I had no issues in drilling 3/8" pilot holes, and to ...


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I think this is what you need. Check with the representative from Simpson for availability and what size (W) you need. You can filter the desirable size from the table below.


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You might have to use one of these drop-in anchors with an embed sucket. Enlarge the existing hole, if it is smaller than the sucket, and install the sucket with recommended adhesive. If the existing hole is larger than the sucket, clean the hole and fill it with mortar paste and the sucket. Do not install the curtain rod holder until the adhesive/mortar has ...


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I wouldn’t use self drilling drywall anchors if I didn’t know what I was drilling into. If it’s lath and plaster, or fiberboard or hardboard (you said there are holes???), you’ll run into problems. Use a tiny drill to drill a pilot hole. Be slow and gentle so you can feel what you're drilling into. If you hit a wood lath or a joist, screw a sufficiently ...


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Since the structure is known to have lath on the walls I would not use self drilling bits they do have problems with lath or I have experienced problems with lath. the gypsum ceiling that is over coated the self drilling work about as well as a drill bit. Many thought Sheetrock because it was less expensive was an inferior method so a skim coat was overlaid ...


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This will most likely not work because you won't be able to get this to screw into the plaster. That stuff is HARD. I use masonry drill bits in my house, and they go dull after just a few holes drilled. You will probably be OK using wall anchors as far as the anchor holding your light, but I would go with a different style instead, like the expanding plug, ...


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I would recommend something this: It is for wood, but I think it will do fine with thin steel. Name should be coach bolt. Drill hole through door big enough for thread on the bolt to pass freely. But too small for the rectangular extension under the head. Insert bolt from outside of the door and screw nut from inside. The extension should extend round hole ...


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Another thing you might try is to create an "adapter plate" to spread the load of the door closer over a larger area of the door. As you've already experienced, that this sheet metal is not capable of supporting the door-closer forces centered at the 3-4 screws on the closer. A piece of aluminum plate could be used to spread the load to 5-10 screws ...


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To address the anchors shown in your picture, basically they're ordered from "cheap and useless" up to "pricey but actually holds". The basic wall plug, in my experience, pulls out so easily that even when they come included with things you're going to attach to a standard drywall wall, you're better off throwing them away and using a ...


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Have you considered old-fashioned butterfly anchors (AKA toggle bolts)? They're fairly burly, cheap, widely available, and don't require any specialty tools, equipment, machining, etc. Note that for a foam-filled door, you would need to do some fiddling to make sure the "wings" can actually open up in there, but just sticking a scribing tool in the ...


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Could I suggest not using screws at all, and using something like 3M VHB (Very High Bonding) tape? Some varieties are stronger than rivets, at least according to 3M, and is used in a lot of places where rivets used to be used, such as in attaching various parts of cars to the frame, or in bonding parts of airplane wings together. See https://www.3m.com/3M/...


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Since security could be a concern, I'd suggest a plate on the outside with square holes punched, or round holes drilled to accept carriage bolts that go all the way through the door and nuts on the inside. This will prevent anyone from being able to remove bolts from the outside. If you drill a clearance hole through the plate, you can use a file to square ...


14

This appears to be well suited to a rivnut installation. The threaded insert is placed in a hole sized appropriately to the insert, the tool is used to compress the portion inside the door and the threads remain for the bolt to engage. Rivnuts are best used on thin sheet material. Rivnut tools can be quite expensive, but those are primarily for production ...


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Any type of threaded screw will eventually pull out. I'd think about using some bolt and cap nuts. You'd have to drill right through the door and can probably use the same holes on one side. I'd think about adding a few washers on each side for a little extra strength.


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Limo is correct, you can replace the machine bolt with an L bolt/hook that has the proper threads. I prefer Toggler anchors for superior weight holding ability. (Limos advice would work for those as well.) BUT, positioning both hooks level and spaced precisely for the keyhole hangers is a challenge. If the back of the painting will allow it then i would use ...


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