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7

These don't come out easily, sometimes they can be pushed back into the wall and dissappear, this is often the case if the person installing it was thinking ahead and drilled the hole deeper than needed as an end-of-life plan. Else you need to drive the shaft back in a bit to release the wedge and then pull on the sleeve part, locking pliers are useful ...


5

It’s based on the 1) angle of repose, and 2) weight of soil, and 3) length of deadman. 7-8kn equals about 1500 - 1,800 lbs. If the angle of repose is about 45 degrees and your soil weighs about 80 lbs. per cubic foot, then you’ll need about 2,000 lbs. (safety factor) resisting. Therefore, you need to bury your deadman about 3’ deep if the deadman is 3’ ...


4

I used sleeve masonry anchors for my solar panels. Screws will not work well with concrete. Solar panels act like a sail in the wind, do not underestimate the forces involved.


3

Mount a 24" piece of 2x6 up there with four 3-1/2" lag screws and 4 2" lag shields, one in each corner.Then screw the bracket into that with two 1-1/4" lag screws. Use 3/8" lag screws for the header and bracket. Center the 2x6 over the hole in the concrete, Screws should be about 1" down and over or 1.4" diagonally from each corner. Washers are a good ...


3

Those are 2 different types of wall anchors. The blue ones are generally drywall anchors. You drill a hole just large enough for the blue plastic sleeve to press-fit in. Usually, you'll need a hammer to gently bang it in the final 1/4" (2-3 mm) - it should be that tight. You would then line up the mounting hole of the thing to be hung over the center of ...


3

Is your wall made of cake? That first picture looks like cake. But seriously, look at the plastic anchor your tried to put in that hole and compare it to another one. I think you will find that the used one is broken. What happened is you screwed that anchor in to a stud, and it broke, leaving plastic behind. Drywall anchors are used to hang things on ...


2

You can use the supplied mounting system if you put a spacer behind the bar that mounts to the wall. ( between the bar and the wall to bring the bar out to the same plane as the tile.) The spacer will need to be the correct thickness, I.E. measure how far off the wall the tile sits. If you do not have a planer or table saw You may need to sandwich a ...


2

Yes, you're on the right track to improve lateral stability. Your ideas will all help. Some things to add is a layer of OSB or plywood as wall sheathing on one or both sides, if possible. Another thing would be joist blocking in the floor below. An example of that would be a few 14.5" long 2x10 between the joists a bay or two on both sides of the knee ...


2

These are wedge anchors and they're almost impossible to get out withoutY damaging the wall. Your best bet is to use a cutoff tool like a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel. After removing the bolt portion you can grind away at the sleeve to recess it a bit more and then dab some white caulk around the hole to seal and cover it up. Good luck


2

First - what kind of construction uses a 2" slab for a floor? Trying to get more concrete down there is unlikely without breaking out part of the floor because it needs something to displace in order to do what you want. Even if you got some down there it's very unlikely to hold. Why not go to a 3/8 x 2 1/4 expansion bolt. I know you're rightfully concerned ...


1

You can find drop in anchors made for shallow materials such as this one at McMaster Carr. It accepts a 5/8" thread and requires 2" embedment. You'd just have to cut a short piece of 5/8" threaded rod, thread it into the anchor, then spin on the stop.


1

The Toggler SnapScru product you used is decent, with two cautions: 1, you need to maintain solid pressure while driving it in. Doing this with a screwdriver is somewhere between tough and really hard -- you want to use a drill or an impact. 2. If you hit something solid, you'll just chew up the drywall. If you did hit something solid, (and you know it's ...


1

The Code requires an edge distance based on the size of the bolt: 1) 1/4” = 1 1/2” 2) 1/2” = 2 1/2” 3) 5/8” = 3” This is based on standard grade concrete, (i.e.: 2500, 3000, etc.) If you use a “high-strength” concrete it can be reduced. (See ICC Chapter 19, Table 1908.2) Generally, I see “J-bolts” installed after the foundation wall is poured. This is ...


1

Definitely don't mount it on an angle. Two options: Single layer, wall solution. Get a piece of wood the same thickness as the tiles. It should be the same width as or just slightly less than the width of the cabinet, and the height should be from the top of the tiles to the top of the cabinet. Mount the wood to the wall into studs using appropriate ...


1

Mounting a pull-up bar on drywall and metal studs? : No. Both of your suggestions are the wrong kind of bar. Assuming the door has casing trim on it, you want one of these: They're also like $30, instead of the unreasonable price of $150+ for a piece of pipe attached to two mounting brackets.


1

I bought some shorter Tapcons and noticed the shank on the new ones was thicker than the old ones I had. The short ones went in as easy as could be expected but the shank did not break as the old ones did. 1/4" Tapcons with 3/16" drilled hole as they suggest. They must have made them thicker due to breaking.


1

I've found keeping a cheap boroscope in the toolbox helps immensely with this. Small holes next to baseboards are always easy to spackle and are rarely noticeable after being fixed.


1

Here is the professional method. Buy yourself a reverse drill bit, an easy out driver and start with a center punch to guide your drill bit. Remember to operate your drill in reverse as you drill a hole using a professional-grade metal cutting wax such as Relton Stick-Kut, then use an easy-out driver with plenty of straight, even down pressure to slowly ...


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