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55

Not the answer you are looking for, but: Loud Alarms are What You Really NEED Assuming that the premise is a sound one, that people need to be warned of unexpected/unauthorized entrance to the pool area, a loud alarm is the right answer, not an electronic notification. A few examples: It is all too easy to ignore texts/notifications/etc. "If my boss/...


46

Ask your insurer and defense lawyer Lawyering on whether this rule is really a mandate is probably a waste of time. It's a "best practice" and one easily implemented. Which will create civil and criminal liability for you if you don't implement it. "I'm willing to lump the risk", does your insurance company also agree to lump the risk? I bet they don'...


20

Based on your link, I'm assuming you live in Florida. The relevant statutes are 515.29 Residential swimming pool barrier requirements and 515.27 Residential swimming pool safety feature options; penalties. 515.27 list a few options to secure a pool: "In order to pass final inspection and receive a certificate of completion, a residential swimming pool ...


6

Some battery-operated alarms use a radio signal to interconnect so they're all set off together. You should be able to verify/test this using the test button: press it on one, and if the others go off then you know they're interlinked. As far as what's triggering them, there's a few possibilities: Dust in in the sensors. Recent renovations especially can ...


5

I can see a couple potential ways around this. Pry up the side away from the wall, shove the whole cover towards the wall, possibly pry up the underside/backside of the cover lip, pop off. That's assuming both are on the same side. Long screwdriver though one of the holes on the opposite side of the box from the screws - have fun finding the head. A ...


5

This is actually relatively easy - many hobby shops (eg Maplin in the UK) have kits which require very little technical know-how. I guess the pre-requisites are: Understanding your perimeter - use break sensors on the highest risk areas (doors and easily accessible windows) use motion sensors in key hallways do you include your garage do you include ...


5

No cause for concern, cat 6 and other UTP network cables are very good at rejecting interference, the relatively low voltage and power of the security system will not disrupt the signal on the UTP. Big, high power sources of interference like arc welders might.


4

Alarm You could pick up a magnetic window/door alarm (some more expensive models may also have glass break sensors). If the window is opened, the alarm will sound. Secure the window You could purchase, or make a "security bar" similar to the ones used for sliding doors. This will make it more difficult to open the window, though would not protect ...


4

There are several online shops where you can buy anything from a basic wireless security system with peel and stick sensors all the way up to the same panels that professional installers use. If everything is already wired up as you said, then this should be a fairly straightforward DIY project. (One quick note though, even if it looks perfectly wired, you ...


4

I can't speak to the regulatory side of this, other than to say I'd be very surprised if a custom-built circuit like you're describing would pass an inspection just for the fact that it's a non-UL/CSA approved device on a life safety circuit. Being in a private residence at least will relax the requirements compared to a commercial or multi-tenant building, ...


4

I doubt you'll get any latitude on the code as written. The code is written very clearly. It isn't within the code enforcement official's discretion to set it aside upon request. If there is ever any accident that may have been prevented by alarms per the code, they'd be responsible ethically and legally. I personally think relying on app notifications ...


4

This is a glass impact/break sensor. It is wall mounted and hard wired back to the control panel. It detects impact and actual glass breaking up to about 30 feet. Per @Menace, clap your hands near them and they should light up.


3

When an alarm trips, it can send out one or more of three types of alerts: local - an audible alarm rings at the property direct police connection - when the alarm rings, it goes off in the police station itself (rare) central station - an alarm goes to the alarm monitoring company, which then alerts the police in certain circumstances (such as no one ...


3

HEMS, the vendor, answered my enquiry. There is actually a clip (first image in the original question) with an arrow mark on it. The problem is that the mark is uncoloured, very difficult to be noticed from where I stand. Push the clip to the left to release the lock, then pull down the whole thing. You will find the latch hardly slides: it has to move ...


3

If the wire for the switch and the bell that is in the existing conduit is carrying 110V, the answer is NO. You can not mix High & Low Voltage in the same conduit, so you will need to run an additional conduit to connect to the second set of terminals. Is this for your residence or for a business? I question this as you are "playing with fire", in ...


3

There is a reason that refrigerators do not have internal electrical outlets and that reason is so that people do not die. Generally, that socket is a bad idea because a refrigerator is cool and when warm humid air enters, it will condense. The amount of condensation could easily rise to a level beyond that at which the socket is electrically safe. Unlike ...


3

Such connections are not UL, CSA, or NFPA rated because the alarm panel cannot supervise the smoke alarm circuit. 2 and 4 wire low voltage alarm circuit are supervised and report more to the alarm panel than simply an alarm condition. For example, if properly wired, damaged wiring or missing detectors will cause a trouble condition. You can physically do ...


3

In a single family dwelling, it would be best to use regular smoke alarms. Pick a brand that also sells an interconnect relay, and you can use that to connect it to your security system. To answer your question, yes you should be able to use low voltage smoke detectors as long as the central control panel has a battery backup and the overall system ...


3

From the National Fire Protection Association: Smoke alarms installed in the basement should be installed on the ceiling at the bottom of the stairs leading to the next level. I presume this is to detect smoke as it rises up the stairs. I have also read on the detector instruction sheet NOT to install smoke/monoxide detector closer than 15 feet from ...


3

If it is hardwired then there will be a cable going to each smoke detector. It is usually pretty obvious. If you don't see anything then see if you can remove the smoke detector from the ceiling. If you can remove it easily (typically by twisting it slightly and then pulling away from screws and/or a mounting bracket) and it comes off (except possibly for a ...


3

Have you read the relevant county/state code? Have you actually spoken to the inspector about you doors and the required alarms? The document you cite, "cspc-safety-barriers", is a citizen advisory and not a regulation of any kind. Is "cspc-safety-barriers" cited in the relevant county/state code? Did your inspector tell you to follow that advisory? Make ...


2

If it is available in the UK, I would go with Z-wave technology. While I have only dealt in the US, I hope this can help. I've sold quite a bit of Z-wave and been trained in installation it's similar to installing regular devices like switches and dimmers. Programming is simple with the remote, and I hear the computer interface makes it easier. In the US ...


2

If the modem is the only problem, replacing it might well solve the problem. As for finding a particular model of old modem at a non-outrageous price - ebay; sometime patience is needed for a very specific model or to get it at a non-absurd price, but generally modems are pretty cheap there. Where the number is programmed - to be certain, you'd need a ...


2

My suggestion is that you try pressing in (or up) on these two tabs: And then that the lower part of the unit will hinge down. The hinge edge being along here:


2

Have a look at Iris. You can mix and match components such as door/window sensors, thermostats, motion sensors, etc. It hooks to your wifi and can send you text alerts.


2

Most security system have a minimum of 9v DC, but I've seen up to 60v AC or DC, running to the sensors. The concern here is voltage drop as these are extremely low current devices. If you are using magnetic/reed switches, which it sounds like you are, they are unpowered digital switches (either on or off). Digital logic circuit typically require >50% of the ...


2

You could add another outlet to the garage side but it will probably need to be offset from the current box. With the new outlet in the garage it will need to be a GFCI type outlet to meet code. A old work box would be the easiest to add.


2

This sounds like a fun project for a rainy weekend. I have similar situation. Bought a house that had an old alarm system in it. The box is locked and I don't have a key. The "control panel" still lights up and there is a "ready light" that glows whenever all of the sensors are "happy". I'm thinking it would be easy to take one of the super-simple wifi ...


2

Just did it by pushing the bottom part a bit towards the ceiling and meanwhile sliding the clip to the left which is the arrow pointing direction - and yay it easily was opened.


2

Thank you for this, I have an alarm similar to the one in the first photo. You only have to slide the clip a very little way while pulling the cover down from the side of the clip to open it up. Had to get a torch to see the arrow on the clip.


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