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The cord gets stuffed directly down the lineset cover, because the manufacturer doesn't give us any better option Normally, stuffing cordage through a wall is a major no-no (NEC 400.12, point 1 in this case). However, the manufacturer hardwired the cord to the indoor unit, and worse yet, CSA listed it this way. So, since it's an outdoor-rated cordage type, ...


0

Most minis that I have installed use TC cable. The compressor and controls are 240v but the voltage on the inside unit can be different. If the unit is listed by UL / or another 3rd party agency and they specify the SJOW it is legal to use the cable/cord. The W in sjow is for water resistance water will not be a problem with this cable. Last make sure you ...


4

if you have a clamp meter you can check the current draw of the compressor. A too high current indicates either a stalled compressor or the compressor spinning freely not doing any compressing. It is also possible that an internal part of the compressor failed which would also need replacement of the compressor. Replacing a compressor requires both ...


1

You need a different, additional device. You could just have an exhaust fan and an intake fan, but the efficient option is a Heat Recovery Ventilator (or the slightly different Energy Recovery Ventilator) which have an intake and exhaust fan combined with a heat exchanger (or a heat and humidity exchanger for the ERV) that helps to reduce the expenditure on ...


1

The system you chose is called a heat pump. It is a specific kind of heat pump, called a mini-split heat pump. Air conditioners have a hot side and a cold side. The hot side is outdoors, and makes the already-hot outdoors even hotter. On a cool day wouldn't it be nice to switch them, and make the house warm and the outside cold(er)? Nothing need be moved, ...


6

Split machines do not have, normally, large tubes inside the walls. The tubes between the inside unit (evaporator) and the outside unit (condenser) are only carrying refrigerant and so are small. You would need a different system to replace the air inside with fresh air from outside with perhaps temperature and humidity control. All the existing system does ...


0

Vents are best as big as possible. It is easy to reduce the flow of a vent, but difficult to increase it. An 8" round = 4x4x3=36 square inches for air to flow through. A 4x12 square = 4x12=48 square inches for air to flow through. A 6x10 square = 6x10=60 square inches for air to flow through. A square duct does not pass quite as much air as a round duct....


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The traditional solution for water coming out of a sump basin is larger or more pumps. In Fox Valley area IL, a neighbor had 4 pumps in his basin, in wet weather 3 pumps would run. I had two pumps, one was a 12V back-up, but it occasionally ran when the other pump was running. On the other hand, also putting something like a plastic barrel with no bottom ...


1

Forget the walls... Water should be stopped at its point of entry. Because you suggest building "walls around the sump pump", then I assume that water is entering your basement at that point. It is the sump pump's job to remove water from the basement. If the sump pump is able to remove water faster than it comes in, then it will keep the basement ...


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This is merely a way for them to jack up prices and force you into paying $400 for a job you can do yourself for $20 I have charged my system many times and it's fast and easy using only a $49 set of guages.


3

Cold air blowing inside a metal tube plus very hot humid weather equals condensation. It's a part of life on planet Earth. You could insulate the duct work, as that will help prevent the warm moist air from coming in contact with the cold metal, but if it takes tropical storm/hurricane levels of humidity to cause condensation, it may well not be worth the ...


2

If you need this out of your house now, rent an appliance dolly like this Image courtesy of Amazon.com, no endorsement of brand or retailer. Image provided purely for example. Any of the nationally known moving truck rental chains will have them available, many of the national big-box DIY stores will rent them to you as well. I'm sure you can find a smaller,...


3

You need to put it back together enough so the covers are on it and the freon system won't be broken open by mishandling. That's the only goal, you don't need to put the controls or vents back together, just the case. Freon is serious business. #1 it can freeze your fingers to the point of requiring amputation, and someone handling the unit may think they'...


3

Ok the capacitor will discharge over time and is not going to electrocute you if the unit has been unplugged for any reasonable amount of time (30+ mins typically, leave it overnight if you're scared) You have a refrigerant circuit inside of the machine and the best you're going to be able to do is remove the small blower motor and fan from in-between the ...


1

A portable ac unit can dehumidify in the winter but the problem will be when the temps are below 62 F you risk icing the evaporator coil and possibly damage to the unit. If the coil ices then it will not be effective because of the coil being blocked at the temps you list. Many portable ac units are capillary tube controlled or no true active component to ...


2

Imagine you had a working thermostat and you flipped it to "A/C" and set the temperature to 50F. The thermostat would "call for cooling" so long as the temperature is above 50F. Since I bet your system would never get there, that means it would "call for cooling" continuously. That is fine. If your heat pump unit can't run ...


6

If your AC unit was running correctly before the thermostat failed, then it will be OK to run it continuously until the AM when you plan to shut it off. Just don't freeze tonight because it won't be cycling on and off. When weather is extremely hot, AC units can run continuously and many do down here in South Florida. Just replace the thermostat as soon as ...


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