11

I think you are over engineering your solution. It is a small 1HP 4.1 CFM compressor with a small 2.5 G receiver and 90 PSI max operating pressure. The copper pipes will not burst in your lifetime. You may have a very unlikely leak at the receiver valve or a more likely leak in your hoses and connections. I leave my compressors on all the time and have ...


8

Take it to a shop that either does hydrostatic testing, or has an arrangement with a place that does. It will cost far less than $100, barring a major ripoff. Any place that deals in compressed gasses (welding supply or diving supply) needs to do this on a regular basis (5 years per tank), as do fire extinguisher service shops (which might actually be the ...


5

Call a service technician. Your system probably has a leak, and is low on refrigerant. The system iced up due to low refrigerant. Then as more refrigerant escaped, the system lost the ability to cool.


5

NO , a ball valve only will control flow. If you even allow a slight orifice the size of a human hair with time the chamber pressure would be at 800 psi. I would look for a used scuba regulator they can handle up to 3000 psi and the first stage around 135psi , their actual output pressure can be adjusted a little. I mention this because I used an old ...


4

Actually, it is a fielder's choice. Either way, all you have to do is make up a cord with #10 wire that is rated for 30 amps with a male plug on one and a female plug on the other to transition between the different plugs. Good luck and stay safe!


4

There are 2 common types of connectors. Unless your female quick disconnect is a universal one, and you will need to get the other type of connector. This is assuming that you are pulling back on the sleeve on the female while pushing the male into the connector. The automotive type has a wide band close to the end of the male and the standard or generic is ...


4

You are over thinking this. I have a large compressor (about 50 gal) in my shop that never cycles unless I left an air tool connected to a hose that's leaking. I leave it powered up 24/7. It's EXTREMELY unlikely for a copper pipe to fail. All of my air plumbing in my shop is copper and it's been fine for 15 years. Even if it were to "fail", ...


3

Your tool and your compressor both have (or should have, but they probably do) ratings in "Standard Cubic Feet Per Minute" (SCFM) possibly stated just as CFM. The compressor SCFM needs to be equal to or greater than that of the tool to operate the tool continuously. Small "homeowner-grade" compressors are often not rated for continuous operation at all (...


3

If there's a window, you don't need a dipstick. If there's no lower outlet, open the inlet and turn it over. Or, suck it out (auto parts stores typically have something for doing that.) Compressor oil changing does not need to be especially convenient as it's relatively infrequent, and the scale of compressor you show is not impossible to turn over by hand ...


3

There is a great video on YouTube by "The Build Show" about various PEX and push to connect fittings. They pump them up until they burst. They burst well above the stated ratings. Unfortunately I can't answer the nylon pipe question but check out the video The Build Show with Matt Risinger 14,000 PSI test I temporarily installed PEX Airlines and PEX oil ...


3

There are several other ways to test a pressure vessel. Also, a hydro is not necessarily double, it's usually 125-150% of the safety valve pop, depending on the situation. A popular method today is ultrasound. This exploits the fact that the tank usually sits at one orientation, so accumulated tank water rests in one area, and that is where corrosion ...


2

Put a 30A cord on it You should be able to remove the existing cord from the compressor and attach a 30A cord (10AWG cordage, either terminating in a 6-30 or a 14-30 with the neutral wire at the device end terminated in a way that won't short to anything, including the case) to the thing. This is no different than putting a 15A cord on a 1A clock. The ...


2

TLDR: you must follow the labeling or instructions on the motor or compressor. You can change breakers without changing wires. The rules for 240V receptacles are exactly the same as for 120V receptacles: cheater cords are out of the question. labeling and instructions on an appliance must be followed. if the breaker is 30A, only 30A receptacles can be ...


2

Automatic blowdowns This taps the bottom of the tank where water would accumulate. At intervals, it blows some air out of the tank. PSHHHHHT! This ejects most of the water and some air. This operates at time intervals, when the compressor cycles on or off, or when water is detected. Your electric bill will not like this In real world practice, ...


2

That statement means after four hours of run time. Storing air doesn't cause water accumulation. I'd drain it every few months if you only use it occasionally. The fact of the matter is that there will always be water in it, and when it rusts out you can't do much about it. Industrial compressors have air drying mechanisms upstream of the intake air, so ...


2

Pressure tanks are usually steel, steel is somewhat flexible, it stretches a bit when filled, if the tank is left full it can shorten the life of the tank, I used to have a small scuba shop and did tank inspections as required annually, with hydrostatic testing every 5 years , the recommended pressure for long term storage for all tanks was 500 psi this is ...


2

Storing a oil less compressor in just about any position will be fine but make sure to blow the water out of the tank prior to storing it.


2

You are in the wrong section, 440 is refer equipment, you need too roll back to section 430, Motors, Motor circuits, and Controllers. Part III Motor and Branch circuit protection Then look at label: Continuous duty motor, Section 430.32. More than 1 HP, Paragraph (A). Thermally Protected, (2) A thermal protector integral with the motor, check, now we're ...


2

Seems like the pump may be defective. It should have a valve to allow air into the ball, but not out of it. That does not appear to be working from your description. The "pump" looks very poorly made, at a glance. Even with appropriate adapters, pumping up small things like balls and bicycle tires at a filling station is risky - it's very easy to ...


2

Small compressors tend to be under-engineered for a prolonged run. Some big, custom-built ones are not really "engineered", but built from what's at hand instead. Both of these types usually lack the protection features that may make them acceptable for unattended operation. All of them have a nasty failure mode when they don't start because of an ...


2

Absolutely Yes, this is simple physics the air is not requiring as high of pressure the throughout increases. Most air compressors rate there pump rates around 50 psi, 90 psi and the max psi. Even my cheap little pancake oil less has a dual rating of 3/6 scfm I don’t know for sure the exact number but was able to find the formula on line. Just Google the ...


1

Depends what you hook it up to for a spray gun. You know the limits, shop accordingly, or use a paintbrush.


1

That is indeed a check valve and it prevents pressure in the tank from leaking out through the compressor when it's not running. This is nothing specific to the model of compressor you have and you can likely find a suitable replacement for the whole thing at a dealer that sells parts for compressors. The key thing will be get one that has the correct ...


1

I have found that the Fortress has a different type than what I am used to. Mine work but if I leave connected the tank will lose pressure over a short period of time. I have the automotive type. They say to buy new matching male female and the issue will go away.


1

Given that you are likely talking about a residential air conditioning compressor with a single phase motor, that sound would be indicative of a failed Starting Capacitor in the compressor motor, so the motor is not able to start. Many of those are hermetically sealed compressors, so the capacitor is separately mounted somewhere away from the motor itself, ...


1

I used a 90 PSI needle scaler (Ingersoll-Rand Model 125) for two weeks, four hours a day of nearly continuous scaling. This needle scaler consumes 8 SCFM. My compressor was an Ingersoll-Rand Model 30 with an 80 gallon tank, rated for 24 SCFM, with a 7.5 horsepower motor that consumes 40 amps at 230 volts. The compressor cycled on and off every few minutes ...


1

For continuous duty on the compressor end you need a rotary screw rather than a piston compressor; you've probably seen road crews towing them behind the truck. For continuous tool use what you need is a compressor which provides a higher CFM than the tool requires. (And technically an air set to inject oil into the line, because if you're stopping to ...


1

Short answer: NO Nylon doesn't compress the same way PEX does and thus needs to be compressed more so your go no-go tool won't be able to tell you if you have a good fit. Long Answer: GAWD NO! Your fears are totally unfounded, those push-to-connect fittings are far more secure than PEX crimp fittings - Porsche, Ferrari, Jaguar, Mercedes, BMW, Fiat and ...


1

Pex will work as long as you dont exceed the max PSI. Moisture build up will be the problem. All of the built up moisture could escape into your air tools.


1

At 15A, that is a 3HP motor (assuming 240V single phase here), the "6HP" is a marketing term that means WHEN the motor is slowed down by a change in the load to it's "Break Down Torque" speed, it will develop 220% of rated torque, VERY briefly, in attempting to get the motor back to speed, so 220% torque at a just slightly lower speed results in 200% HP for ...


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