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As long as you’re not replacing what you have with Zinsco, Federal Pacific, or Challenger, you should be fine with what you have/replacing with your current manufacturers products. A good rule is to have tri-annual electrical inspections, and IR tests done. These are looked upon favorably by insurance underwriters. I’m a risk analyst for insurance companies. ...


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The fact that you want to connect a GFCI recep downline of another GFCI recep, and you have concerns about feeding a light from a GFCI recep, suggests to me you are unfamiliar with how GFCI "Downline Protection" works. A GFCI is a device, not a receptacle. You've been buying combo devices that provide both. A GFCI device is perfectly capable of ...


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The breaker swap makes this work Since you're going from a 240V-only circuit fed by a two-pole breaker to a 120V-only circuit fed by a single pole breaker, and downbreakering from 30A to 20A, your plan to continue the circuit with 12/2 to GFCI receptacles and ordinary lighting on the patio is fine. Since these are outdoor outlets, you won't need an AFCI ...


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Paint can act as an insulator so is it a hazard not normally. Wire nuts cut into the wire slightly so the nut itself makes contact if nothing else. Best practice would be to use a bit of sandpaper or scotch brite to clean the paint off and provide a better connection. In motors the red varnish is really thin. A 3m rep showed how well scotchlocks (there wire ...


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Dual function breakers are just as effective as single function. i.e. they both trip equally well in combination as they do alone. The problem you may be referring to is that AFCI protection is known to cause nuisance trips for some people. Supposedly this has gotten better over the years, but I've heard from others on this forum that some people still ...


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It is not true that dual function devices are less effective at either task. The ground fault is detected by measuring a difference in current between the line and neutral which indicates current is going somewhere it shouldn't be going. This does not necessarily detect arcing between line and neutral. Arc faults are detected by measuring high frequencies ...


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They should be equally effective. They have a job (or two jobs) to do, and are designed and tested to do that job. But I would suspect a higher incidence of False Positives nuisance trips*, particularly since you can't have one part without the other. One option to consider is AFCI via breakers and GFCI via receptacles (first in each chain), which also ...


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Arc Fault detection is done in the breaker with an electronic board and a set of sensors feeding it, connected to a trip relay. In the electronics, there is a microprocessor that is looking at the current sensor data using an "Arc Signature Filter" algorithm. Every mfr of AFCI breakers and receptacles has their own version of this Arc Signature ...


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You have it easy, since they added the GFCIs near the panel So they did "my trick", which is install a junction box right next to the panel and use GFCI receptacles rather than GFCI breakers. There are two reasons to do that, #1 GFCI receps are way cheaper than breakers, and possibly #2 can't get GFCIs for obsolete panels. For instance Pushmatic ...


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GFCI: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter AFCI: Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter They do different things. If the arc happens between the hot and ground, you're probably protected, if it's between hot and neutral, probably not. [Needs an electrician to confirm - I haven't had coffee yet this morning.] If you're worried about arc faults in your older wiring, you'll ...


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The simple answer is living areas require arc fault breakers. Places like kitchens, living rooms, bedrooms, family rooms and great rooms. Places the family hangs out. Garages, unfinished basements, attics, outdoors do not. One of the biggest hiccups is the individual interpretation of the inspectors. They are the governing authority. Usually they are more ...


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Just got off the phone with both Leviton and Siemen! Thank you to Peter Duniho for having me file that AFCI Safety form, was super helpful in me getting in touch with Siemen! I'll put everything I've learned here so everyone else could potentially benefit from this. What can be the issue? False Positive: Some appliances have the tendency to produce a sine ...


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Don't ignore the possibility that this may be an actual fault in the appliance, or at least that the manufacturer may accept responsibility. I have had a similar issue with two different appliances (dishwasher and coffee machine) and in both cases the manufacturers agreed to treat it as a warranty issue. In one case they did a repair, and in the other they ...


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Dealing with the problem now: One of the first things to try is just swapping the breaker with an identical one in the same panel. In my experience, there's a lot of individual variation in the exact behavior of both AFCI breakers and appliances, that sometimes you can get the problem to go away just by using a different combination of individual components. ...


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A properly functioning audio/video amplifier should not cause AFCI trips AFCIs work by monitoring the waveform of the AC power signal and looking for a particular type of distortion that is indicative of an electrical arc, and cutting power if that is seen. This doesn't play well with every device -- some devices, such as brushed motors, have small electric ...


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The popping noise you hear on start up was probably the surge charging the electronics up and that confused the AFCI. AFCI’s monitor the load and a non Linear current draw the pop on startup could be the issue. I have seen this in audio gear plugged into different circuits the first piece of equipment cross connected to the mixer tripped the circuit, leave ...


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