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Aside from the need to land the circuit’s hot AND neutral on the AFCI breaker (or GFCI or A/GFCI), as ThreePhaseEel discusses, there’s another problem with this panel, so you might as well fix it now. One neutral per lug. Period. There are a small number of electricians who group each circuit’s neutral and ground together and stick them under the same screw ...


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You need to move the neutrals for those circuits onto the breaker neutral lugs Many AFCI breakers, yours included, have a ground-fault trip in them, set at around 30mA, in order to catch arcs and other firestartingly hazardous leakages to ground. As a result, these AFCIs not only need their neutral pigtails connected to the neutral bus, they need the ...


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Stop throwing parts at it and actually troubleshoot It would help to read through your GFCI/AFCI instructions and get clear on whether the device is indicating GFCI or AFCI fault. In other words, treat the indication as if it is genuine, and not just gibberish from broken junk. Let’s ditch the red herring: it ain’t the MWBC We know it’s not the MWBC (Multi-...


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I would not use a dual function breaker on the lighting for several reasons. The first being the lighting circuit usually has the fan and possibly a humidistat , timer I have had trouble with GFCI’s tripping and fans my best guess is the emf on start and turn off is the cause not always but often enough that several of the owners that had me install them had ...


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A GFCI cannot be used where two circuits have a shared neutral line. It is rare, and probably violates all versions of the National Electric Code since 1970, or earlier, but I encountered a situation where I installed a GFCI circuit breaker in a bathroom outlet circuit in a house that was built around 1958. The GFCI kept tripping every hour or two for no ...


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