31

Slightly contrarian take: start over. (I know, you've done a bunch of work, etc. They call it the sunk-cost fallacy for a reason. Strong butt joints in the rail are possible but hard and would involve a ton of wood filler afterwards.) Get another door. Rough cut next to the hinge stile (but not cutting off the molding on the stile). Extract the panels and ...


18

As I've posted before, the risks of asbestos exposure on a very infrequent basis in a residential setting are highly over-blown. The real risks were for construction workers (pipe insulators, HVAC insulators, etc. ), back 50-60 years ago who where exposed to asbestos dust on a daily basis. I know the lawyers will hate me for saying this, but frankly ...


10

If not making new panels, make or purchase an H shaped moulding and set the panel halves into it. By eyeball (but measuring tape may say otherwise) the top panel parts might be pulled out and rotated to provide similar "tie-in" as a new panel would, with that new H shaped moulding running horizontally, if the sizes work out. Too late now, but had ...


8

Wood and water are a poor mix. There is a really good reason that you do not see show enclosures made out of wood. It is also the reason that you will not find much in the way of wood shelves for use in showers. When wood is used in showers and steam rooms for benches and shelves the wood of choice is teak. If you are bound and determined to put maple wood ...


5

Just about any 2 part epoxy would meet your requirements. However, gluing both sides is asking for trouble in the future. Couple of ways around this. You could use loctite blue (thanks @jwh20 for steering us away from red) on the grub screws, which would be reversible but more secure than your current setup. You could lightly dimple the axle with a drill bit ...


4

You're not clear on the circumstances or the purpose for attaching them. But to answer your question any type of good quality construction adhesive is a very good method of attaching two panels of that size. you can add some screws for reinforcement.


4

I think I'd use a permanent outdoor mounting tape--one with foam or silicone as its backer. It's good for a couple reasons: The bond will be reliable. The combination of specialty adhesive and a malleable surface make it likely to perform well. It'll leave a clean (or hidden) edge. Fluid adhesives are likely to squeeze out, ruining your aesthetic. Even if ...


4

I use water-based (project or panel) adhesive on foam board or any plastic which the solvent will dissolve, or where cleanup of spills is a concern. Solvent-based (heavy duty) for almost everything else. It dries faster and holds better.


3

No. If anything you'd use construction adhesive, and not wood glue, but if you've done a good job with the screws glue isn't needed. In fact, it's rarely used in cases like this. If you find that there's flex in your supports, re-screw it and make sure the boards are dead tight. Spread the screws widely in the vertical.


3

Glue doesn't work by "being absorbed into the wood" as you say. It forms a bond to the wood surface. The problem here is your choice of material, chipboard. This s simply a compressed mass of wood chips held together with some glue. As you have discovered, those particles are not held together all that strongly. It's not clear why you can't use ...


3

I personally have never seen vinyl pulled up, after being glued down, come up in a usable condition. Even it it does not rip or tear i find the backing material separates and stays with the glue on the floor.


3

Not what you are describing, but "duct seal" is a (all I've ever seen is gray) non-hardening putty intended for plugging conduits to prevent various things (air, water, rodents, insects) from coming along with the wires, usually at building penetration points. Find it where electrical supplies are sold, though it may not be all that obvious on the shelf. It ...


3

I would think a marine grade epoxy should do the trick for you. It would definitely be waterproof and it's made to hold up under the stresses of a moving boat, and to hold up to salt water which is much harsher than the fresh water in your rain barrel


3

The Glue E6000 is quite strong also but requires a full 24hours to cure and must be untouched in the mean time. It should harden after about 30 mins but it's really best to give it 24hours. Also its a flexible glue so its less likely to give out from vibration. They also have a "industrial" variant called e6800. I have used it for a few years now ...


3

Do you have enough panel material to do this? Biscuit jointing the framing is your bare minimum. If you have enough material left over, replacing 3, 2, or even one of the horizontal members will help strengthen and stiffen the door. Another option might be to make this a bifold door, but that would mean attaching two vertical "jambs" in the cut, ...


3

Dental floss (bathroom handy) or fishing line. Wrap it around a couple of handles (toothbrushes also seem handy in a bathroom) and saw the thing free of the wall.


3

Is it 1cm plaster? If so, the hanging load capacity is limited by the plaster, not the glue. Any vibration from movement of the blinds will eventually weaken the plaster and the integrity of the plaster & paint could fail, letting go of the blinds while keeping the glue in tact! Perhaps you can run a wooden horizontal support (a batten, as you say) along ...


3

Is it possible that we are releasing fibers? Anything is possible, but it is highly unlikely that incidental contact would release fibers. It is also highly unlikely that there is any appreciable amount of asbestos there (if any at all). There is a ZERO percent chance, assuming there is asbestos there, that the scenario you are describing would in any way ...


2

I've had a similar situation and I found Liquid Nails for Marble and granite to work very well. It's also rated for use on metal. You can purchase it in single tubes and it's great for spot repairs on tile and granite. Just make sure the surface is cleaned and follow directions. Be sure to secure the tile in place until it dries. I couldn't tell if there is ...


2

The short answer is that yes, construction adhesive alone could do the job, but it's unlikely to save you time or effort. Some caveats... The opening would need to be just the right size and shape, or you'd need to come up with fillers. That means more joints to be glued and more points of failure. The effort involved would probably add up to more than just ...


2

JB weld is one of the best epoxies I've used. It's specially good for multiple surfaces. When gluing plastics, you want to roughen up the surface so the glue adheres to it better. If the metal is smooth, roughen it up too with some emery paper before gluing.


2

Small dabs of clear silicone caulk. You'll have to secure the foam while the silicone cures (maybe 4 hours), but it'll hold very well and will be a breeze to remove and clean up. You could use masking tape or lean a broom against it. Start with pea-sized dabs, and leave them round until the foam presses into them. Keep them away from the window frame for ...


2

Because this application of polystyrene has been so problemmatic, have you considered thermal liners/draperies, or applying long sections of large sized bubble wrap, which only require spritzing the glass lightly with water to cause the bubble wrap to tightly adhere to the window panes? Either remedy should afford better insulation with less work.


2

I would venture to say that if you remove that cement, the people in the apartment above you would land in your apartment. Your entire building is probably made of poured concrete and you're seeing the bottom of the upstairs apartment's floor. The Styrofoam™ sheets you're seeing are for sound and thermal insulation between your apartment and the one above. I'...


2

Frameless fishtanks are held together with 100% silicone. In many cases that's also what's holding the windshield in place on the car, to the best of my recollection. Cure time is moderately long, so the prior suggestion to look at rearview mirror glue is probably going to be easier. Things need to be very clean (regardless of what type of glue you are using....


2

Put a nice big glob of hot glue (glue gun type) on the end of the gear and press the hand into it. You want enough hot glue that some gets onto the gear teeth to help hold better. A slit piece of scrap paper (or two with the slits in different directions) would catch any excess if you used too much, and it's easily trimmed away from the gear when cold if you ...


2

Attach the pointer to a short piece of tubing that fits snugly onto the stepper shaft. Something like a drinking straw could work, or a piece of a ballpoint pen, or toothpaste cap, or toothpaste tube end. You could put a piece of wood dowel inside the tubing and use a tiny screw to attach the pointer to the tubing. Alternately, you could drill a small hole ...


2

Regarding Loctite PL 500 landscape adhesive (mentioned in the asker's answer)... Service Temperature: -20°F (-29°C) to 150°F (66°C) No, landscape adhesive (or at least that specific product) isn't rated for temperatures encountered in a fire pit. That said, if you put a bead toward the outside of the course rings I'd expect it to hold up fairly well. ...


2

It's possible. As a guitarist, I know that this is exactly how bookmatched guitar tops and backs are constructed. Typically that uses aliphatic resin for the gluing. I also know the work involved in planing dead flat surfaces for that butt joint! This is going to be a long, painful exercise. I'm with the others that you need to start again. You certainly can ...


2

By design, this assembly is not supposed to need any glue or caulking. The gray gasket on the overflow horn (visible in pic) is supposed to press and seal against the back of the tub wall, and the white gasket on the overflow strainer is supposed to press (no need to seal the front, it's just a cushion) against the front of the tub wall. If it were me, I ...


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