Hot answers tagged

11

Even if someone makes an adapter in this direction, it's a Very Bad Idea. 1/4 down to 1/8 - no problem. 1/8 up to 1/4 - big problems. You may exceed the speed rating of the larger shank tool - small shank tools tend to spin a lot faster, and can do so because their tools are smaller. Spin a tool that's too large too fast and you can explode it by centrifugal ...


7

Simplest and most reliable option (no sliding contacts required) is a 1 foot extension cord (or a longer one, but 1 foot will get the desired degree of freedom.)


6

They plug right in If you wire the blue pair (4,5) for phone service (or the blue and green (3,6) pairs for fancy two-line phones.) No adapter is needed. I do it at work all the time (my employer's employer's employer uses 24 port Cat5e patch panels as voice patch with a 25 pair cat3 run to them. One pair to each jack and one spare pair. I don't know why ...


5

Flip the electrical socket over Turn main breaker off, make sure both sockets are dead, 1 coverplate screw, 2 yoke screws, rotate 180, put it back in. Don't even need to take the wires off (actually: don't). Now your appliance cord is working as intended: giving a flush-to-wall socket that you can back furniture up against, yet allowing both sockets to be ...


5

Unscrew the spigot from the tap and then the washing machine pipe will screw straight on to the 3/4 thread. Edit based on comments: This is a picture of a "normal" standard replacement hose. Do note both ends have plastic fittings which are standard. there are stainless wrapped versions but they are only rated to the same working pressure anyway. ...


5

This is a 1/4" x 1/4" hex adapter. Sizes will vary depending on the allen wrench used. Instead of using this, you could get an offset screwdriver: slotted on one side, Phillips on the other.


4

Chop and solder. Of course, if the current adapter is dead, it can be difficult to establish correct polarity - but I think I see that labeled nicely on the present adapter (it's not always, though it should be.) For a tidy job, split the cords and cut the + and - wires at different lengths (so the joints are slightly offset, rather than being at the same ...


4

The Dremel won't have the power to drive that wire wheel Wire wheels take a lot more power to drive than you think. That 2" or 3" wire wheel is made for a drill capable of driving a 3/8" bit into hardwood or a 1/4” bit into steel. It is simply going to stall the Dremel the first time it touches work. At first I thought "too fast", ...


4

You can definitely plug your powerline adapter into your in wall adapter. It might take up more than one space on the in wall adapter thought preventing you from being able to use an outlet. check the sizes before you buy.


4

I used the phrase "replacement crank handles" in google and saw lots of places to visit. One promising site lists handles like shown here: Picture Source A model EN 570.2-80-B3.0 sports a 3/8" bore hole and a lever length of 3.15". You may have to work out adapting the bore with a set screw or craft a D slot using epoxy.


4

I know exactly what you mean, those plugs are just a nuisance most of the time. @Ecnerwal's answer using a short extension cord is going to be the simplest and cheapest way to work around this. Another option - I will often re-terminate cords to get them the exact length I want, you could do the same to get a regular straight plug. A decent quality UL ...


4

Shopping questions are off-topic here. However, I was able to find what you're looking for by searching for "coleman" (since they're one of the most popular makers of 1lb propane tanks and the camping grills that use them) and "1lb propane grill adapter". I was able to find this at Amazon in pretty short order. Various other adapters ...


3

Wrong adapter Your problem is basically entirely that you have the wrong adapter. Your transformer is a UK worksite transformer that outputs two 55V legs with an inaccessible center-tap for the grounded neutral, and thus uses IEC 60309 pin and sleeve (also known as "CEEform" or "Commando" in the UK) type connectors as they are rugged and ...


3

In my experience, and as per the usual instructions - they perform worse, or not at all plugged into a multisocket. You want it directly in the wall, and if losing a socket is an issue, there's passthrough versions. - for example, netgear explicitly suggests you not do this In some cases - using a passthrough might also help filter noise from any device or ...


3

What you have done is connected the LED lights in parallel to the switch. This way, when the switch is on, the LEDs are shorted out and power flows to the pot lights. When the switch is off, you end up effectively with the LEDs and the pot lights in series. Because the LEDs are so low power, the power flows through the pot lights without giving them enough ...


3

The images in the eBay post show a 12v 7a power supply with a pinout on the power brick. The pinout shows only a 12v positive (pin) and ground (barrel). The connector is called a 4P Power Snap and Lock, but you may also find it loosely described as a 4 pin DIN connector. The latter description is slightly inaccurate. If you have a volt meter, you can ...


3

Your adapter is probably safe. However, I would have used a 3 conductor cable instead of a 4 conductor cable; that way there is no neutral to cap. Another option would be to cut the plug off the end of the other piece of equipment and wire on the 14-30P. A third option would be to wire up an 14-30 receptacle right next to the existing L6-30 receptacle, ...


3

Yes. Your plan will absolutely work, and be safe. Make sure you properly use flexible cable (likely SOOW) with the breaker box you put together, and consider strain relief where the cable exits the box. However, the cheaper route you mentioned, isn't as dangerous as you think..... Consider any device you plug into a normal 15amp outlet. Very often, the ...


3

I figured it out. I’m not sure if this is the groove @ojait was referring to or not, but I was able to maneuver the rubber gasket into the spot inside the female side of the adapter below the ball bearings. I used a chopstick. The seal now is slightly leaky, exactly like it was until I messed things up yesterday. Thanks to all for taking a look!


3

I'm sure there are some suitable adapters out there. The traditional way to do this is to actually put RJ11 jacks on where you need them. If someone later wants to change things around, they replace the jacks, without having to run new cable because they will see it is Cat 5e or Cat 6. In the really olden days, you might even pull a single 4 pair Cat 3 cable ...


3

When I want to have the option of using the same wiring for either phones or data, I install cat6 (or cat 5e) in the wall, with RJ45 jacks on the wall in every room, and the I buy patch cables with RJ11 on one end and RJ45 on the other to connect between the wall jack and the phone. This way you don't need bulky adapters and can standardize the wiring and ...


3

Others have tried to explain but the spark is not unusual. Is there anything you can do to prevent the spark from happening? yes, you could turn the breaker off and plug it in then turn the breaker back on. The load will still cause a spark but you won’t see it inside the breaker and because breakers snap closed or open the duration will be shorter. When ...


2

I'm thinking of buying an instant pot The good news is that the specifications for that instant pot say it comes with both UK and Schuko power cables. So you shouldn't need to adapt anything. Are adapters unsafe? There are a few issues with adaptors. There are a lot of really shoddy adapters out there. Many adaptors do not provide an earth connection. ...


2

Here's a work-around. Use the 110v smart switch to turn a normal phone USB charger on/off. Get a USB heating pad for < $2, or if handy w/ solder, a 500 ohm usb-powered resistor. now you can make a small space slightly warm (or not warm) via wifi wrap the heater around the thermostat temp probe behind the air filter on the AC. You might have to remove ...


2

It really depends what you're powering Three cell phone chargers, you're gonna be fine. But a table saw and a dust collector, ain't gonna happen. The power-factor-corrected loads (i.e. Their VA not their watts) need to be added up. They need to be within the capacity of the circuit (15A=1800VA intermittent, or 12A=1440VA continuous). You should be ...


2

If the device has a 100-240V adapter, it's a 100-240V device, not a 110V device. Or more likely it's a (some lower DC voltage you have not looked at - should be printed on the adapter, usually in tiny faint type) device with an adapter that is 100-240V So, you should not need anything more than a way to plug its adapter in to use with 240VAC


2

It looks like you have "cross threaded" the plastic pipe. (The term comes from the new set of threads you have accidentally cut into the pipe, which cross the original threads at several points.) The only repair that will work here is to force the metal nut straight onto the end of the pipe, forcing it to re-cut the original, correct threads. This will ...


2

I would use a clevis pin like the image, with a bit of hex shaft welded into it for the chuck to grip. Remove the safety clip and withdraw the clevis pin to allow the jack eye-hole to pass into the jaw, then push the pin through and secure with the safety clip. A spacer to reduce the play between the clevis pin diameter and the jack eye-hole diameter will ...


2

The socket on the transformer is a "CEEform" or "Commando" socket (they are two names for the same thing). It's a widely used international standard, but is completely incompatible with the standard German or French plugs. You would need to buy or make an appropriate adaptor to fit your US plugs. Or take off the US plugs and fit CEEform ...


2

Generally speaking, you can. The adapter doesn't much care what metal parts are between it and your service panel--even the outlets have internal contacts and screw connections. The only concern would be if the adapter has worn or dirty contacts or introduces noise due to protection circuitry or whatever. Even clean contacts reduce signal quality somewhat.


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