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15

Fine nails are fine. But you do need to drill a clearance hole the full diameter of the nail shaft through the plastic. You may want to drill a smaller pilot hole at least partway into the wood to reduce the chance of splitting. Any standard drill bit will do, but go very slowly to avoid melting the plastic as you drill. Drill bits tend to walk on plastic, ...


5

As you have already found out, cutting P-glass is tricky. The plastic cutters you mentioned are very gimmicky and don't work that well. I would suggest the following procedure: After marking out your cut on the plexi, take a scrap piece of any firm material, plywood, an old board, anything, and cut a slightly oversuninstallized hole in it to act as a ...


5

It's probably mineral deposits from your water. Clean it with vinegar, or CLR. Then, get a squeegee and wipe down the shower after you use it to keep it clean for longer.


5

When this has happened to the kids (we let them help when painting) I just pick the paint out of their hair with fingernails while watching TV - they sit still and it's quite 'Gorillas in the Mist' It does take a wee while, but it works without the use of any chemicals.


3

The scope of your project requires an equally large scope of preparation. Swap out the ladder for a scaffold system. Replace the hand drill with, at a minimum, a drill jig to keep alignment while you drill. Use drill bits designed for drilling plastic to prevent cracking. Your emphasis on avoiding splintering/cracking increases the importance of proper drill ...


3

This E-How article says that a soak with your normal shampoo, followed by running a fine-tooth comb through the affected area(s), should remove water-based paints including latex acrylic. By fine-tooth, I assume they mean a comb like a pocket or dressing table comb, but you may have more luck with something like a lice comb. Now, latex paint with VOCs may ...


3

I find that olive oil or similar cooking oil usually removes sticky hardened gunk. paint, gum, etc...


3

Commenters are right: Everything sags under its own weight. The question is how much you'll tolerate. There are simple formulas for the deflection of simple structures like this. For a uniformly loaded square plate with simply supported edges, . And for a plate with clamped edges, , where d is maximum deflection, W is the load, L is the length of a ...


2

Until you get to very thick small units, or goods more rigid than plexi (such as glass, which also flexes and sags) you will have some deflection. It also depends on whether there will be any weight on it. If 1/4 inch (with no load) is not a problem (this is a guess) then you may be ok. If you are putting a 10 lb. plaster statue on it, it will flex. If it ...


2

How big is this dock going to be? If it's 12" or so, you might be able to laminate thing strips as BMitch says. If it's going to be less than that, the curves will probably be too extreme. One alternative is to glue flat stock (say 1x6x12) together until you make a block, then cut the shape that you want out of that block using a bandsaw. This should ...


2

If you want something that's flexible, then you need the thinnest board you can find. Something like this might work since it's only 1/4" thick. If you need a thicker surface, then glue two or more pieces together in the bent position. I've also seen boards placed in a hot steam to make them more flexible. Get plenty of extra wood to be prepared for some ...


2

It is "safe" but as the paint out-gasses it will continue to smell sour. I used some older paint on a bathroom in a garage once and it continued to stink for months. Only you can decide if the smell is worse than paying $30 for more paint. Good luck!


2

Polycarbonate (Lexan) might be a better choice than acrylic (aka Plexiglas, Lucite or Perspex). It's very tough but a bit softer with a bit of a yellow cast in the transparent 'color', whereas acrylic tends to be hard, more transparent and much more brittle. See, for example, this comparison. I would still drill the holes of nail diameter + a bit. Go a ...


2

If you take a look at the picture in this question you'll see that a "normal" tub has an integrated flange that is meant to go behind the tile. Your one-piece is not designed with tile in mind, so especially at the corners, you are going to have a gap between the tub and the wall. Depending on the design of your one piece, cutting off the top might cause ...


2

The problem with expanding foam products is that you cannot effectively "control" the expansion, so it may expand in the gap to the point of damaging your acrylic from the other direction! The type that would be less likely to do that will also not really provide meaningful support; it will just compress with the flexing of the acrylic and you are back to ...


1

I'm rather fond of polycarb corrugated roofing panels. They price out at about $1/sf and are available in transparent-but-distorted charcoal or clear, and translucent white that diffuses as you wish.


1

Universal wood blade might not be the best for this. Blades with a high tooth count (100 or more for a 10" blade) will work best. Try to find a blade with a low rake angle (teeth should look straighter rather than laying down at an angle). Blade height should be adjusted so the blade sticks above the material 1/2 or more rather than just clearing the ...


1

You can try adding matt finish powder. It is not noticeable in color and reduces the shine of paint. The tough part is the level of shine so start small in adding the matt powder, then do a test paint and allow to dry. You must paint this indoors on your tests so get some drywall pieces and if vertical walls, stand the test piece vertical. Horizontal ...


1

Traditional wood forms intended to be reused are oiled so the concrete doesn't stick. There are many ways to do what you want, breakdown wood forms, plastic, whatever. Not much will stick to concrete if the forms are removed when the concrete is cured just enough to stay together. Make sure the insides of your forms have draft angles built in so they can ...


1

If you have access to a laser cutter, e.g. local makerspace or hackerspace, community college, or public library that might have a "fab lab", then that is the approach I would suggest. EX: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjwOC26OJFU


1

You do not specify thickness, so I'll take a guess at 1/4" or thinner. The problem with drilling plastic is that conventional bits will "catch" on the plastic, pulling the bit into the hole with more force than desired, typically cracking the plastic being drilled. Using step-up method to drill the hole will not eliminate this problem. Lacking the ...


1

A simple way to find out... (1) Use your smartphone camera to view the remote: the camera is sensitive it the IR and will show up when you press a button on the remote. (2) Now view the remote through a sample of the acrylic glass. This is also a handy way of testing the remote e.g. for flat batteries. HuwjOnes --o-0-o--


1

Here's a search result from ePlastics, a reliable plastics manufacturer (companies I have worked for have bought from them repeatedly). Infrared transmitting (IRT) sheet was specifically formulated for projects requiring ultraviolet (UV) and visible light blockage while allowing infrared (IR) transmission starting about 750nm. The physical properties of ...


1

I have done almost this exact same retrofit. It was a lot of work, but you can leave the existing tub. I refinished mine with a Rustoleum epoxy product, but that's another story. Basically, depending on the tub, I would take everything down to the studs, and start with a good masonry board, and any possible structural/plumbing changes you might need.' The ...


1

Gluing on structural straps is an iffy project for most materials. Have you considered pop rivets? The tool can cost less than $10 and the rivets a few dollars more. You just drill a small hole throught he plastic, punch a small hole through the strapping, insert the rivet through the holes, add a washer on the webbing side and operate the tool. You may ...


1

There are purposes for rotary tools, but you haven't listed any good ones in your question. A hacksaw or pipe saw is what you use for PVC pipe, for example - a rotary tool just isn't suited for that task. Too, an XActo saw (the manual razor saw) is a beautiful tool for cutting smaller pieces of wood, while a larger machine is called for if you need to cut ...


1

To cut 0.4mm acrylic board I recommend a utility knife. What you do is draw a line for the cut, rest a straight edge on the line, then "draw" a line down the straight edge with the utility knife while putting only slight pressure down. You repeat this a few times until you have created a groove in the acrylic. Then you can begin pressing the knife down ...


1

It is fairly unusual for bare steel (with paint) to peel, it rather will develop rust spots and blister off. The typical scenario is that your posts are galvanized and the galvanizing on the post is "rusting" which means its forming a zinc oxide layer (which is powdery) and pushing the paint off. The fact that you have not mentioned rust will also confirm ...


1

I would buy an auto-body primer and then use auto-body paint. You can get a really good look doing this especially if you spray.


1

Try dish soap and really wet hair. If that doesn't work, you might try using some gritty toothpaste. The dish soap would get between the hair and the latex and help it come off, the toothpaste would act as a mild abrasive and chew up the paint so that it could be washed off.


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