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26

Tape it. You are not proposing this kludge as a permanent fix. That's good. The wrap-tape products are good for an emergency bodge, and that's what you are proposing, on a temporary basis. The problem with them is when they manage to stop the leak and then folks decide not to call the plumber (or do the plumbing themselves, whichever) after all. I would also ...


9

I agree with @jeff wheeler that all of these temp fixes are more work than a proper repair: go to the hardware store and buy ABS pipe in the same diameter. You can buy it in either 2 foot or 10 foot lengths, whatever is appropriate. Buy two couplers in same diameter, called rubber fernco couplers.. Have store associate show you how to connect them as "...


8

I would do one of two things, depending on access and tool availability: Make a Pipe Patch Cut a suitable length of scrap 3" pipe, then rip slightly less than half of it out lengthwise. Apply purple primer to the outer surface of the old pipe and the inner surface of the new pipe. Apply pipe cement to those surfaces, then snap the patch in place over ...


3

If you happen to have one, a 3D printer pen* can act like a plastic welder in this case. I would recommend against doing this for PVC, but ABS is what those pens often already use. I'd first drill a tiny hole, as I suggested in a comment on Ecnerwal good answer. It doesn't have to be large, just 1/16" (~2mm) at each end of the crack to relieve stress. ...


3

There is a GREAT ABS repair product, you can actually use it to fabricate ABS tanks for RVs and campers, using it to weld-glue abs panels together. The product is called PlastiMend-black. You will need to cease using the upstairs sinks before and for several hours after you apply the patch for it to properly bond. (area need to be dry when applied. the ...


3

The simplest option, assuming that the flange would not stand too high above the finished floor, is to do nothing. The wax ring used to seal between the flange and the toilet can take up quite a lot of misalignment. If the difference from the high side to the low side is less than maybe 1/4 inch (or even more, possibly) it'll be fine. I'm not sure that a ...


2

It looks like that reducer is cemented on to a 22 1/2 degree sweep and separating them will really a job. You best bet would be to remove both those pieces because you don't know exactly which piece is leaking. Cut that second piece where it comes out of the wall as close to the bent as possible to save as much of the protruding pipe so you can cement a new ...


2

It makes no difference with cement-welded pipe. If you install a wye or tee or other splitter you inherently have one of each anyway. Also keep in mind that enough cement and dissolved plastic tends to push out at that area that the interior shape of the part (sloped vs. square) becomes somewhat moot. I suspect that you're actually referring to "street&...


1

If it's actually ABS, ABS is soluble in acetone and you should be able to patch the crack by bathing it in 100% acetone nail polish remover for a while to soften it then binding it with rope to press it together as the acetone evaporates out of the plastic.


1

Other solutions are good. Especially if pressure within pipe is low. Did pipe crack due to mechanical stress? Pipe may have been bent by forcing it past woodwork etc. New pipe may have same stress if jammed in. Check if other infrastructure installed later is compressing pipe. After temporary fix, and if safe from electricity, wrap rag or something at lower ...


1

Don't ever glue a fitting that is designed for threaded pressure fit. The threaded fittment allows the piping to be lined up then tightened for a leak free connection. Nobody but an expert could possibly line up hard glued piping under a sink. The standard fittings sealed by plastic seals, held by threaded connections, has a range of adjustment in ...


1

Neither tape nor putty should be used with a plastic compression joint. Tailpieces like that sometimes have flat washers when you probably need a tapered one--it should be the same as those at the other joints. Have you gone beyond hand-tight with the nut? Sometimes an extra half-turn with a large pliers seals the deal. Just support the pipes when you do it.


1

As mentioned in the comments you first need to make sure that you have the proper washers assembled correctly on the tailpiece coming out of the disposal. Then, remove the P trap and attach the white drain pipe in the picture to the tailpiece first before attaching the P trap. This will take any potential lateral pressure off the joint that's leaking giving ...


1

If the union on the trap can be loosened so the sink end of the trap can be swung on an arc, then you could cut out a piece in the horizontal section and reconnect with a rubber connector which would allow axial rotation and would allow some in and out repositioning to properly line up all the parts for a leak free drain. If the union on the trap is cemented ...


1

Why do you need a coupler? I would undo the u bend outlet, shorten and re tighten.


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