Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 70144

For questions about the supply and removal of water and liquid waste.

1
vote
The hydrostatic head water pressure on the sewer plug from the downstairs toilet is roughly 1 psi. The hydrostatic head from the upstairs toilet/drains puts roughly 6 psi on the plug. That is about 7 …
answered Jun 4 '18 by blacksmith37
0
votes
Sealing depends on what you are doing: Ordinary hardware store pipe has NPS threads ( in the US). NPS has a spiral leak path that must be filled with something to hold pressure ; for pressures of muni …
answered Aug 12 '17 by blacksmith37
0
votes
If you have a traditional gas heated tank heater; Sand and other debris can build up on the bottom and cause "bumping" . A steam bubble forms and as it rises off the bottom it collapses in the cooler …
answered Jun 8 '17 by blacksmith37
3
votes
Pipe is cast iron . The collar/flange is likely brass.
answered Aug 27 '17 by blacksmith37
2
votes
It looks like water is condensing on the cold inlet pipe under the right conditions. The copper is more corrosion resistant than the galvanized steel to these conditions . I would clean it with a wir …
answered Jun 19 '17 by blacksmith37
1
vote
The smell is hydrogen sulfide, it is detectable at much less than 1 ppm. It is in your water supply. Usually caused by sulfate reducing bacteria in a well. Because others with the same water don't h …
answered Sep 20 '17 by blacksmith37
1
vote
Stainless will be stronger than brass , so less likely to strip. Assuming a brass stem , galvanic corrosion should not be a problem. The stainless is unlikely to gall with the brass shaft. A wrap of t …
answered Aug 22 '18 by blacksmith37
1
vote
I would not use putty. Be sure the bottom of the sink is clean and smooth.The rubber gasket should be sufficient to seal without putty.
answered Jul 25 '17 by blacksmith37
2
votes
A standard water softener will remove most of the calcium ( and Mg, Ba, Sr , etc) from the water supply. It will not remove existing scale in the pipes, etc. It would be expensive to remove the existi …
answered Jul 23 '18 by blacksmith37
7
votes
There is copper tubing and there is copper water tube as defined in ASTM B-88. Tubing is usually soft and comes in coils. Water tubing is usually cold drawn and comes in straight lengths. K, L, and M …
answered Mar 13 by blacksmith37
0
votes
Somewhere in your piping you have steel components where the galvanizing has corroded away ( or possibly was not galvanized originally). It will make a lot of brown water (rust) before it corrodes thr …
answered Jul 3 '17 by blacksmith37
1
vote
Normally each pump has its own float switch . They are set to increasing water depths so each one comes on independently at successively higher water levels in the sump . So the first pump comes on at …
answered Jul 21 '18 by blacksmith37
0
votes
Plumbing application solders usually use mineral salts which can be corrosive if not rinsed off. Electrical solders use "resin' fluxes which are not as corrosive so do not need to be rinsed off which … a narrow temperature range. 30 tin:70 lead used to be very common,maybe still is. Many new plumbing solders contain no lead for political correctness , so compromise on various properties compared to tin/lead. …
answered Mar 4 by blacksmith37
1
vote
It looks like it was thinned by corrosion until any stress opened it. Ammonia and it's compounds are notorious for attacking copper alloys ; Ammonia cracks brass not copper, but corrodes copper quickl …
answered May 8 by blacksmith37
1
vote
As I understand the fitting was between a nylon tray and plastic hose; If so, galvanic, stray current, dissimilar metals had nothing to do with the corrosion . Just corrosion by soft acidic ( CO 2 ) w …
answered Feb 17 '18 by blacksmith37

15 30 50 per page