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Results tagged with Search options user 5960

A contact device installed at the outlet for the connection of an attachment plug.

3
votes
Chances are one of your breakers is in fact tripped, but the handle does not appear to be tripped. Try turning them all off, then back on one by one. Knowing which breaker really goes where is handy …
answered Jul 12 '17 by Bryce
0
votes
While the call may be rare for an electrical plug expert: there is just such a person who runs The Digital Museum Of Plugs and Sockets. Head over there for any deep plug research.
answered Dec 21 '13 by Bryce
0
votes
You can also build an adapter cord. Screw type plugs and receptacles are readily available for each of NEMA 14-50 and NEMA 6-15. That and a short piece of cord and you're done.
answered Dec 27 '17 by Bryce
4
votes
If the non-contact voltage sensor is not an option, build yourself one of these: (An outlet cheater, with the ground wire hooked to a bit of wire). Connect the ground wire to the third prong of an …
answered Aug 26 '13 by Bryce
0
votes
Here's the opposite of an answer to your question: The digital museum of plugs and sockets, http://www.plugsocketmuseum.nl , where you can find current and historic sockets, enough for hours of con …
answered Feb 6 '14 by Bryce
9
votes
If split, all plugs will get the same access to "power". Your outlets themselves are splitters: in general several outlets share a run of wire back to the power source. The external "spliter" is no …
answered Feb 5 '14 by Bryce
1
vote
Way cool toy. There are a variety of possible causes. The actual hole in the wallboard reduces the insulation value of the wall: thus if the inside of your walls are warm, you could see hot spot eve …
answered May 15 '14 by Bryce
1
vote
You can rent or buy a circuit tracer, true. But cheap and easy: turn breakers off one by one until the existing socket goes dead. Now work backwards, finding the nearest also dead socket. Yours likel …
answered Nov 13 '13 by Bryce
4
votes
This style center screw extends into the outlet: it's possible both parts need replacing. Pull on the cover to add tension when removing the stripped screw. Turn off the juice before taking the cove …
answered Jan 31 '14 by Bryce
2
votes
Two options: 1) Replace the ceiling fixture with a pull chain model, plus an outlet. Bypass the present switch. 2) Run a new cable from the outlet to the switch box. Your picture shows white color …
answered Jan 30 '14 by Bryce
0
votes
Part of your problem may be: too many GCFI's. All GFCI's in the same area can be chained, saving money trouble and vampire energy. First in the chain protects all the others downstream. So fix one G …
answered Nov 27 '18 by Bryce
4
votes
The normal rule in the USA is: You can work on your own home without an electrician's licence, but you can't hire yourself out to others. Permit requirements don't change. So sketch out what you w …
answered Aug 25 '15 by Bryce