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For topics generally relating to the design, materials, fixtures, construction, maintenance, and other specialized considerations of a shower enclosure, typically located within a bathroom.

2
votes
Most better thinset mortars are proprietary polymer-modified recipes which provide bond and flexibility that cement alone doesn't offer. Your home brew will be brittle and unreliable. You could attem …
answered Apr 16 '18 by isherwood
12
votes
No. A clog doesn't necessarily result in a leak (usually doesn't, in fact), and there should be no water in the downstairs ceiling. You have two distinct issues here, or possibly a complex issue inv …
answered Oct 24 '16 by isherwood
2
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If you're using the Teflon tape effectively you can turn your arm through a range of angles without substantially affecting tightness. Start over and make sure you're using enough. You shouldn't actua …
answered Oct 13 '17 by isherwood
1
vote
I'm going to speculate that you've set your cement board tight to the floor, and that it reaches two inches short of the height you'd like your tile to reach. I'm also going to guess that you haven't …
answered Jun 10 by isherwood
1
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I'd consider canned spray foam around 2 or more pipes slightly back in the wall cavity (not around the valve itself). The foam should have enough flexibility to handle expansion, and the wide contact …
answered Dec 31 '15 by isherwood
1
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Assuming that it hasn't been flexed or otherwise damaged so much that its rigidity is compromised, sure. I also assume that either you have as water barrier behind or are relying on a good tile job fo …
answered yesterday by isherwood
2
votes
I wouldn't put holes there unless you carefully waterproof them and are 100% sure they won't show. Some panels don't sit down tight on the bottom. You'll also want to be sure not to crack the flange i …
answered Aug 18 '17 by isherwood
1
vote
You probably don't need to, as the lap in the surround design will drain water effectively. However, those are traps for mildew and grime. I'd clean them as deeply as you reasonably can with rubbing …
answered Jun 20 '18 by isherwood
1
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Surrounds are rigid for a reason. You're likely to have bulges and edges coming loose just because vinyl flooring is flexible. The adhesives designed for vinyl floor are not instant-grab. This means …
answered Feb 14 by isherwood
1
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Your silicone seals should never be wider than about 1/2", and you should avoid smearing caulk onto the face of the backer board. Your mortar and tile will span those small gaps without an issue. Keep …
answered Jul 13 '18 by isherwood
3
votes
You should build out the framing with... more framing. Either sister studs at the correct projection depth, or cut furring strips. Fitting full sheets as filler is a waste of time and materials.
answered Nov 16 '18 by isherwood
2
votes
The silicone was probably cured enough to be used. The problem is probably either a poor bond due to surface contamination or a leak location you haven't found. If you wish to re-caulk, peel and scr …
answered Sep 25 '17 by isherwood
1
vote
Yes and no. You can certainly tape all the joints as you would with drywall and skim the rest of it to achieve a smooth finish, but you can't just skim coat it and call it a day. You have to reinforce …
answered Oct 7 '17 by isherwood
1
vote
I assume that you're hoping to install a swinging glass door set that would normally require that the tile and shower pan walls be on the same plane, with the problem being that the hinges won't …
answered Oct 10 '18 by isherwood
0
votes
You just need to sand it down. Tile mortar is fairly soft and a common sanding block should do. Be careful not to scratch your tile (mask it if you like). Skim it with drywall joint compound if that d …
answered Apr 28 by isherwood

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