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16
votes
Most things that get regularly manipulated should not be hung with hollow-wall anchors. Eventually they pull out or the wallboard disintegrates. I'd install either some 1x4 wooden rails spanning betw …
answered Mar 29 '16 by isherwood
1
vote
In the case of either plaster or Thermalite panels, plastic plug-type anchors should suffice. I'd use those sized for a #12 or #14 screw of adequate length (per the anchor manufacturer's suggestion), …
answered Dec 14 '15 by isherwood
0
votes
It appears that there are two eye screws at the top edge for hanging. If that's the case, 3/8" or 7/16" lag screws into framing would do nicely, or some other heavy steel hook or anchor. The eye scr …
answered May 12 '16 by isherwood
1
vote
There are many types of anchors. I suspect you used the basic cheap plastic plugs. I'd look to the various expanding or toggling types and simply use the same holes. Otherwise, get some setting type …
answered Nov 15 '16 by isherwood
2
votes
Corner bead is usually applied in places where you have solid lumber backing. I'd try this first to hang your hardware without anchors, which usually aren't intended to be used in wood: Mark the loc …
answered Jan 10 '17 by isherwood
1
vote
Drill holes in your plywood in alignment with the stud locations, temporarily place the plywood, punch each hole with a nail or awl, remove the plywood, and place your anchors accordingly. However, …
answered Nov 27 '18 by isherwood
2
votes
Anchor screws and those designed specifically for wood have very similar (if not identical) thread pitch. In fact, anchors often ship with standard pan-head wood screws. I've used them interchangeably …
answered Oct 31 '16 by isherwood
26
votes
It's a matter of preference, but I would float scrap lumber backing at four locations: Down both sides Across the bottom between the two studs Across the between the two studs just below the plumbin …
answered Mar 27 by isherwood
2
votes
You can purchase metal "corner backing"--essentially a sheet metal angle that you attach to your top plate. It's very similar to corner bead, which could probably serve as a substitute, but it doesn't …
answered Feb 7 by isherwood
0
votes
A regular high-speed steel bit will probably cut through the soft faux stone just fine, though it'll dull the bit fairly rapidly. If you have just a few holes to drill I'd go that route. Otherwise, …
answered Nov 23 '18 by isherwood
2
votes
You can find studs in other ways, and then you can measure 16" centers. Look for nails in baseboard trim. Remove the covers of electrical outlets and determine which side contacts the stud. Look at …
answered Mar 29 '18 by isherwood
4
votes
Yes, per anchor unless otherwise specified (and sometimes it is, e.g. in pairs). Accurate? This is advertising we're talking about, and assumes perfect conditions. I'd halve the number given. Regar …
answered Jan 22 by isherwood