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Results tagged with Search options user 35141

For questions regarding the room where one bathes or uses the toilet.

1
vote
I'm picturing a felt or paper backing that has been partially dissolved and then dried out. It's probably not much different from what happens when you accidentally lay a magazine in a bit of water on …
answered Jan 17 '16 by isherwood
1
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I don't consider it any more of a concern than wood wainscot or a vanity that's not hermetically sealed to the wall. I take measures to prevent undue splashing in my bathrooms, such as using a shower …
answered Jul 13 '18 by isherwood
2
votes
There's only one way to fix rotten framing, in my opinion, and it doesn't involve putty. It's with new framing. Cutting out and replacing a short bit of plate (or just a portion of it) isn't difficult …
answered Sep 16 '17 by isherwood
0
votes
Along with Alaska's suggestion, a bath mat should solve your woes, and a little more splash discipline from shower users. Trying to make a bathtub out of one's bathroom floor always seemed a little silly to me. …
answered Nov 26 '18 by isherwood
3
votes
If your bathroom is used mostly by responsible adults, there's no reason for concern. Plenty of kitchens (including my own) have wood floors. The rare splash should be wiped up, and a strategically placed rug can provide more protection. Floating floors usually go around the flange. …
answered Oct 23 '18 by isherwood
0
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You just need to sand it down. Tile mortar is fairly soft and a common sanding block should do. Be careful not to scratch your tile (mask it if you like). Skim it with drywall joint compound if that d …
answered Apr 28 by isherwood
1
vote
The fact that it runs periodically usually means a worn/sticky/slimy flapper valve, but it could also indicate a leak in the tank. The discoloration of the gout may indicate moisture, and the particle …
answered Jan 30 '17 by isherwood
1
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It's important that the installer mixes the grout very well. Pigments can be unevenly distributed in the dry compound. After 3 days I'd suspect this as the culprit, assuming that the bath hasn't seen …
answered Jan 5 '16 by isherwood
0
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Any answers to this question will be heavily opinion-based. Here's mine. Assuming a good roof and adequate bathroom ventilation, there's no reason to use anything other than standard drywall, properly sealed and painted. An exception would be a very low ceiling over a shower that's often splashed. …
answered Dec 26 '15 by isherwood
2
votes
My guess is that you're trying to raise the tile to match the existing hall floor level. For my fraction-oriented friends, the material that was removed is about 1 inch thick. Foam is generally not …
answered Feb 3 '16 by isherwood
0
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I'm a bit confused by the depressed nature of those cracks, but I agree with UnhandledExcepSean. They're probably cosmetic. I've worked on some old sinks and have never had one disintegrate. I'd look …
answered Jan 11 by isherwood
3
votes
The only real issue is rattling noise due to vibration, or creaking due to thermal expansion. In this case, since one pipe is plastic, it's probably not a concern. I'd try to lighten the tension betwe …
answered Jul 10 by isherwood
2
votes
I wouldn't put holes there unless you carefully waterproof them and are 100% sure they won't show. Some panels don't sit down tight on the bottom. You'll also want to be sure not to crack the flange i …
answered Aug 18 '17 by isherwood
2
votes
You're right that your bathroom will have a lot of moisture in it, but if that much gets through to your insulation you're not ventilating enough. Make sure you run your bath fan regularly and for …
answered Mar 19 '18 by isherwood
7
votes
The only good solution here is to run independent duct lines to the exterior, as should've been done initially. It's a violation of codes for good reason, as you've seen. Both ducts should be rigid or …
answered Dec 17 '18 by isherwood

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