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Results tagged with Search options user 194

For questions generally relating to the hot-water supply system of a typical residential or commercial building, primarily regarding the heating mechanism itself (a traditional hot water heater tank, tankless heaters including "point-of-use", boilers and heat exchangers, etc).

1
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Possibly, but without seeing the extent of the damage no one will be able to tell for sure. Given that you have already replaced the element I'd keep a close eye on the heater for a few days to make …
answered Jan 26 '11 by ChrisF
2
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The limit switch wasn't adjustable and the water was getting quite hot regardless of the temp setting. The temps were set where they were supposed to be, but then it kept popping even after I set the …
answered Jan 4 '12 by ChrisF
6
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There is absolutely no difference between the materials used for hot and cold water pipes (at least there isn't in the UK!). The same copper is used for both and if you have a piece of pipe that was p …
answered Jun 21 '12 by ChrisF
6
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Yes this is common in the UK. The boiler will feed hot water into the heating coils in the tank as well as providing the hot water for the radiators. The electric (or immersion) heater will be there …
answered Nov 10 '11 by ChrisF
11
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After doing a bit of research on what exactly hot water return lines are I found this page which goes into a lot of detail about how they work and their benefits and drawbacks. The big drawback I see …
answered May 2 '12 by ChrisF
1
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If you lag the hot water pipes you can help reduce the time it takes for the water to heat up as the water in the pipes will stay warmer for longer. Obviously this won't help first thing in the mornin …
answered Jan 9 '13 by ChrisF